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Rhetoric and Public Culture

Rhetoric & Public Culture: History, Theory, Critique

For nearly a century, scholars and students across the humanities have been reading and responding to the unorthodox work of Kenneth Burke. And for nearly half that time, they have been doing so with help from the University of California Press, which is now widely regarded as the premier publisher of Burke’s wide-ranging scholarship. 

This book series publishes scholarly books written in the spirit of Kenneth Burke, specifically books which model his unique scholarly skill set, exhibiting all-too-rare combinations of historical insight, cultural awareness, critical attunement, conceptual sophistication, and interdisciplinary compulsion. 

Call for Proposals 

In keeping with the intellectual range of Burke’s work, we are now accepting submissions for book proposals written at a variety of scholarly intersections, including rhetorical and political thought, communication and social theory, and intellectual and cultural history.  And in light of Burke’s career-long commitment to the study of language as symbolic action across a variety of texts and traditions—but always in service to critical commentary on his present—we are particularly interested in manuscripts that approach these scholarly intersections from any number of interdisciplinary perspectives, but which do so with an eye toward contemporary democratic critique. Submissions are accepted on a rolling basis. Those interested in submitting to the series should provide the following materials

  1. a book proposal of no more than 4,000 words 
  2. a CV
  3. one or two published writing samples 

Revised submissions may be submitted. Please email submissions and questions to Lyn Uhl. And review the UC Press Book Proposal Guidelines.

Series Editors

Advisory Board

  • Daniel M. Gross, Professor of English and Director of Composition, University of California, Irvine
  • Kelly E. Happe, Associate Professor, Communication Studies and Women’s Studies, University of Georgia
  • Robert Hariman, Professor, Communication Studies, Northwestern University
  • Debra Hawhee, McCourtney Professor of Civic Deliberation, Senior Scholar, McCourtney Institute for Democracy, Professor of English and of Communication Arts and Sciences, Pennsylvania State University
  • Steven Mailloux, President’s Professor of Rhetoric, English, Loyola Marymount University
  • David L. Marshall, Associate Professor, Communication, University of Pittsburgh

  • James I. Porter, Chancellor’s Professor, Rhetoric and Classics, Program in Critical Theory, University of California, Berkeley
  • Keith Topper, Associate Professor, Political Science, University of California, Irvine
  • Linda M. G. Zerilli, Charles E. Merriam Distinguished Service Professor, Political Science and Center for Study of Gender and Sexuality, University of Chicago