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Meaning and Modernity Religion, Polity, and Self

  • by Richard Madsen (Editor), William M. Sullivan (Editor), Ann Swidler (Designer), Ann Swidler (Editor), Steven M. Tipton (Editor), & 1 more
  • December 2001
  • First Edition
  • Paperback
    $33.95,  £27.00
  • Title Details

    Rights: Available worldwide
    Pages: 362
    ISBN: 9780520226579
    Trim Size: 6.25 x 9.25
    Illustrations: 2 tables

List of Contributors
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List of Contributors

Jeffrey Alexander is Professor of Sociology at the University of California, Los Angeles. His most recent books are Fin-de-Siècle Social Theory: Relativism, Reduction, and the Problem of Reason (1995), Neofunctionalism and After (1998), and Cultural Trauma (forthcoming).

Robert N. Bellah is Elliott Professor of Sociology, Emeritus, at the University of California, Berkeley. Among many awards and honors, he is a recipient of the National Humanities Medal.

John A. Coleman, S.J., is Charles Casassa Professor of Social Values at Loyola Marymount University, where he teaches in the Law School and the Department of Sociology. Among his books are The Evolution of Dutch Catholicism, An American Strategic Theology, and One Hundred Years of Catholic Social Teaching. He is currently doing research on Catholic Charities USA, as part of a study of religion and welfare.

Harvey Cox is Victor S. Thomas Professor of Divinity at Harvard University, where he teaches both at the Divinity School and in the Program on the Study of Religion in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences. His book The Secular City (1965) was recently selected by the Faculty of Marburg University as one of the two most decisive books in Protestant theology in the twentieth century.

S.N. Eisenstadt is Professor Emeritus at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. He has also been a visiting professor at numerous universities, a member of many scientific academies, a recipient of honorary doctoral degrees of the Universities of Tel Aviv and Helsinki and Harvard University, a recipient of the International Balzan Prize, the McIver Award of the American Sociological Association, the Israel Prize and Rothschild Prize in Social Sciences, and the Max Planck Research Award.

Nina Eliasoph is Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and author of Avoiding Politics: How Americans Produce Apathy in Everyday Life. She is currently working on an ethnographic study exploring political conversation and moral education between children and adults.

Philip S. Gorski is Assistant Professor of Sociology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. His current research focuses on the relationship between religion and politics in early modern Europe. He is completing a book titled The Disciplinary Revolution: Calvinism, Confessionalism and the Growth of State Power, to be published by the University of Chicago Press.

Stanley Hauerwas is Gilbert T. Rowe Professor of Theological Ethics at the Divinity School of Duke University. His most recent book is Sanctify Them in the Truth: Holiness Exemplified.

Richard Madsen is Professor of Sociology at the University of California, San Diego. Besides being the coauthor of Habits of the Heart and The Good Society, he is the author of five books on various aspects of morality, religion, and society in Chinese societies.

Albert Jordy Raboteau teaches in the Religion Department at Princeton University. He is the Henry W. Putnam Professor of Religion and has served as chair of his department and as Dean of the Princeton University Graduate School. He taught at the University of California, Berkeley, and served there with Robert Bellah on an interdepartmental committee for the Program in Religious Studies. His field is religions of the Americas, with a specialization in the religious history of African Americans. His books include Slave Religion, A Fire in the Bones, and African-American Religion (a high school text). He is the coeditor with David Wills of African-American Religion: A Documentary History.

Steve Sherwood is a graduate student in the Department of Sociology at University of California, Los Angeles. His areas of interest include narrative theory, religious and cultural sociology, and the sociology of artists. Publications include "Narrating the Social: Postmodernism and the Drama of Democracy" (1994) and "Theorizing the Enigma: The Problem of the Soul in Durkheim's 'Elementary Forms of the Religious Life'" (1998).

William M. Sullivan is Professor of Philosophy at La Salle University and Senior Scholar at the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. He is the author of Work and Integrity and a coauthor of Habits of the Heart and The Good Society.

Ann Swidler is Professor of Sociology at the University of California, Berkeley. She is a coauthor of Habits of the Heart and The Good Society, as well as of Inequality by Design (Princeton University Press, 1996). Her most recent book is Talk of Love: How Middle Americans Use Their Culture (University of Chicago Press, 2001).

Charles Taylor is Professor of Political Science and Philosophy, Emeritus, at McGill University, Montreal, Canada.

Steven M. Tipton is Director of the Graduate Division of Religion and Professor of Sociology at Emory University and its Candler School of Theology. He is currently working on Public Pulpits, a study of religious advocacy in Washington.

Robert Wuthnow is the Gerhard R. Andlinger '52 Professor of Sociology and Director of the Center for the Study of Religion at Princeton University. He is the author of numerous books, including After Heaven: Spirituality in America since the 1950s (University of California Press, 1998) and Loose Connections: Joining Together in America's Fragmented Communities (Harvard University Press, 1998).