Celebrating 100 Years (and More) of Southern California Quarterly

By Merry Ovnick, editor of Southern California Quarterly and Professor of History at California State University, Northridge

2018 marks the 100th volume of Southern California Quarterly, the official publication of the Historical Society of Southern California published by UC Press. In celebration of this milestone anniversary, all articles in SCQ 100.1 will be freely available at scq.ucpress.edu through the end of February 2018.


Southern California Quarterly has been published since 1884. Here, a recent issue of Southern California Quarterly (Winter 2017) with some of its earlier named predecessors (issues for 1901, 1948, and 1962).

The latest issue of the Southern California Quarterly is numbered Volume 100, number 1—a number worth celebrating! But a more accurate figure of 134 years is even more impressive. The Historical Society of Southern California was founded in 1883. In 1884 the Society published its first journal, titled Historical Society of Southern California, Los Angeles. Under that title, it published an annual journal 1884–1887. The Society continued to produce an annual journal, renamed the Annual Publication of the Historical Society of Southern California, in 1888–1889 and 1905–1934, appending Los Angeles to the title for the 1891 and 1893–1896 issues and changing the volume numbering system. For the single year of 1890, the Society’s journal just appeared under the name Historical Society of Southern California. There is no record of an issue for 1892, which means that either one was not published that year or merely that no copies have survived. From 1897 to 1901, a partnership with another historical group was reflected in the long title Annual Publication of the Historical Society of Southern California and Pioneer Register, Los Angeles, slightly amended for 1902–1904 to Annual Publication of the Historical Society of Southern California and of the Pioneers of Los Angeles County. In the midst of the Great Depression, the Historical Society took the bold step of expanding from an annual to a quarterly publication, titled simply Quarterly Publication in 1935, a title qualified as The Quarterly: Historical Society of Southern California for the 1936–1949 issues. For 1949–1961 it came out under the title Historical Society of Southern California Quarterly.

Finally in 1962 we see the title still in use today: Southern California Quarterly. With the possible exception of 1892, the Historical Society of Southern California has published a journal from 1884 to the present—134 years and counting. Despite all the confusing name and volume-numbering changes, this long record of publication reflects the commitment of the Historical Society of Southern California to making available the historical record of and research on the history of California, the West, and, especially, the Southern California region available to readers and researchers.

Inside Vol. 100, No. 1

Fraud and the California State Census of 1852: Power and Demographic Distortion in Gold Rush California
Warren C. Wood

Dred Scott on the Pacific: African Americans, Citizenship, and Subjecthood in the North American West
Stacey L. Smith

Modjeska, Paderewski, and the California Landscape
Kenneth H. Marcus

Book Review: The Other California: Land, Identity, and Politics on the Mexican Borderlands by Verónica Castillo-Muñoz
Ana Elizabeth Rosas

Book Review: A Land Apart: The Southwest and the Nation in the Twentieth Century by Flannery Burke
Linda C. Noel

Book Review: South of Pico: African American Artists in Los Angeles in the 1960s and 1970s by Kellie Jones
Lisa Gail Collins


ACCESS OVER 100 YEARS OF SCQ CONTENT: When you become a subscriber to Southern California Quarterly, you get access to all current and archival content dating back to 1884. Click here to subscribe or recommend the journal to your institutional library.


Must-Read Journals for #AHA18

The American Historical Association is convening in Washington, DC for its 132nd annual meeting from January 4-7, 2018. The theme for this year’s conference is “Race, Ethnicity, and Nationalism in Global Perspective.” UC Press’s history journals are contributing to the conversation by making a selection of content speaking to this theme available for free for a limited time. Please follow the links below and share your comments on social media using #AHA18.


Pacific Historical Review Special Issue:
Alternative Wests: Rethinking Manifest Destiny
Guest Edited by Andrew C. Isenberg

The mid-nineteenth century territorial growth of the United States was complex and contradictory. Not only did Mexico, Britain, and Native Americans contest U.S. territorial objectives; so, too, did many within the United States and in some cases American western settlers themselves. The notion of manifest destiny reflects few of these complexities. Manifest destiny was a partisan idea that emerged in a context of division and uncertainty intended to overawe opponents of expansion. Only in the early twentieth century, as the United States had consolidated its hold on the North American West and was extending its power into the Caribbean and Pacific, did historians begin to describe manifest destiny as something that it never was in the nineteenth century: a consensus. To a significant extent, historians continue to rely on the idea to explain U.S. expansion. This Special Issue argues for returning a sense of context and contingency to the understanding of mid-nineteenth-century U.S. expansion. Read the special issue.

 

Historical Studies in the Natural Sciences offers the following articles on the #AHA18 theme for you to read for free for a limited time:

Instruments of Science or Conquest: Neocolonialism and Modern American Astronomy
Leandra Swanner

Fellow Travelers and Traveling Fellows: The Intercontinental Shaping of Modern Mathematics in Mid-Twentieth Century Latin America
Michael J. Barany

Darwin and the Ethnologists: Liberal Racialism and the Geological Analogy
Suman Seth

Retouching the Past with Living Things: Indigenous Species, Tradition, and Biological Research in Republican China, 1918-1937
Lijing Jiang

Bred for the Race: Thoroughbred Breeding and Racial Science in the United States, 1900-1940
Brian Terrell

Visualizing ‘Race’ in the Eighteenth Century
Snait B. Missis

Master of the Master Gland: Choh Hao Li, the University of California, and Science, Migration, and Race
Benjamin C. Zulueta

 

Boom California invites you to read its series of articles on “Undocumented California.”

Undocumented Californians and the Future of the Golden State
Manuel Pastor

Regarding the Documents: Scanning the Mythology of ‘Documented’ California
Jason S. Sexton

California Dreaming? The Integration of Immigrants into American Society
Kevin R. Johnson

The Américas: A Novel of California Begun
David Kipen

On the Road to Opportunity: Racial Disparities in Obtaining an AB 60 Driver Licenses
Laura E. Enriquez, Daisy Vazquez Vera, and S. Karthick Ramakrishnan

California’s Opportunities for Undocumented Students: Are They Enough?
Tanya Golash-Boza and Zulema Valdez

Undocumented Emotional Intelligence: Learning from the Intellectual Investments of California’s Undergraduates
Ana Elizabeth Rosas

Lines and Fences: Writing and Rewriting the California Fence/Wall
Marcel Brousseau

 

Southern California Quarterly Special Virtual Issue:
Home Strategies: Class, Race, and Empowerment in 20th Century Los Angeles

The Southern California Quarterly, published continuously (under this and earlier titles) since 1884 by the Historical Society of Southern California, has touched repeatedly on the themes of housing development, discrimination, and empowerment. In this virtual issue, we present a sampling of its contributions on these themes. Read the virtual issue.

 

 

California History offers the following articles on the #AHA18 theme for you to read for free for a limited time:

Teaching Race in California History Beyond Domination and Diversity
Daniel Martinez HoSang

Victory Abroad, Disaster at Home: Environment, Race, and World War II Shipyard Production
Alistair W. Fortson

Language Education, Race, and the Remaking of American Citizenship in Los Angeles, 1900–1968
Zevi Gutfreund

But Why Glendale? A History of Armenian Immigration to Southern California
Daniel Fittante

Resisting Camelot: Race and Resistance to the San Fernando Valley Secession Movement
Jean-Paul R. deGuzman

 

The Public Historian Special Virtual Issue:
Monuments, Memory, Politics, and Our Publics

The Public Historian, the official journal of the National Council on Pubic History, shares a special virtual issue featuring dozen essays from the journal’s backlist, ranging across some twenty years, that illustrate the evolving historiography on the issue of monuments, memory, history, and heritage and broaden the discussion beyond the focus of the Civil War, Redemption, and resistance to the expansion of civil rights during the 1960s and 1970s.


4 Must-Read Journals at the 2016 Western History Association Conference

Get inspired at the 2016 Western History Association Annual Meeting (October 20-23, St. Paul, MN) with important Western History research from four UC Press journals: California History, Pacific Historical Review, Southern California Quarterly, and Boom: A Journal of CaliforniaIn celebration of this conference, each journal is offering free access to a special selection of #WHA2016 content—from WHA award-winning articles to virtual issues.

2016 WHA attendees: Be sure to visit UC Press at booth #29 to see our full list of books and journals in Western History.


California History

Editor: Josh Sides, California State University, Northridge

Screen Shot 2016-10-19 at 1.21.00 PMUnder the stewardship of the California Historical Society for nearly one hundred years, California History is pleased to offer a special virtual issue on Nature in California History. The virtual issue features historical research on the demise of the Galapagos Turtle during and after the Gold Rush; salt harvesting in Alameda County; the rise of sweet pea cultivation at the turn-of-the-nineteenth-century; irrigation in late nineteenth-century Los Angeles; Bee-keeping in early twentieth-century Los Angeles; the intrigue surrounding the killing of the second-to-last grizzly bear in California in 1916; and the “sprawl” of Yosemite after World War II.

 

 

Pacific Historical Review

Editors: Marc Rodriguez and Brenda D. Frink, Portland State University

Screen Shot 2016-10-19 at 1.30.49 PMThe official publication of the Pacific Coast Branch of the American Historical Association, the Pacific Historical Review has published dozens of award-winning articles. PHR is especially pleased to have been honored multiple times by the Western History Association. To celebrate two Western History Association prizes that will be awarded to PHR this year, we’re offering limited-time complimentary access to these new award-winning articles.

Ray Allen Billington Prize of the Western History Association

A Divide to Heal the Union: The Creation of the Continental Divide
James D. Drake, Vol. 84, No. 4 (November 2015): 409-47.

Jensen-Miller Award of the Western History Association

“A Little Home for Myself and Child”: The Women of the Quapaw Agency and the Policy of Competency
Katherine Ellinghaus, 

 

Southern California Quarterly

Editor: Merry Ovnick, California State University, Northridge

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The flagship publication of the Historical Society of Southern CaliforniaSouthern California Quarterly is pleased to present a special virtual issue on Home Strategies: Class, Race, Community, and Empowerment in 20th Century Los AngelesSince the journal’s first publication in 1884, Southern California Quarterly has consistently published articles that address housing development, discrimination, and empowerment, a sampling of which is showcased in this virtual issue.

 

 

 

Boom: A Journal of California

Editor: Jason Sexton, California State University, Fullerton

Screen Shot 2016-10-19 at 3.27.12 PMLed by guest editors Susan Moffat and Jonathan Crisman, and with contributions from UCLA and UC Berkeley’s Urban Humanities initiatives, Boom presents its Fall issue on “Urban Humanity.” The issue explores exciting and innovative ways that history, geography, and literature intersect with urban studies, art, and architecture to help us better engage with the world.

Read the entire issue for free at boom.ucpress.edu, and join the editors and contributors for special events in honor of the new publication.

 

Thursday, October 27, 5-7PM
UCLA, Perloff Hall courtyard, Los Angeles

Thursday, November 10, 5–7PM
UC Berkeley, 110 Wurster Hall, Berkeley