Nonstop Metropolis Rides the Rails

This week our Nonstop Metropolis subway campaign launched, and we need your eyes to help us locate the eye-catching ads within the MTA system.

We invite you to share your photos and tag UC Press* using the hashtag #NonstopMetropolis. By doing so, you’ll be entered to win a random drawing for a full set of the atlas trilogy: Infinite City: A San Francisco Atlas, Unfathomable City: A New Orleans Atlas, and Nonstop Metropolis: A New York City Atlas (one winner). Additionally, five lucky winners will be sent a set of map broadsides produced for the special exhibition at the Queens Museum.

Be on the lookout for both platform and in-car #NonstopMetropolis placements! Bonus appreciation points if you tag or name the station where you saw platform ads.

* Find us here:

We look forward to seeing you on the subway!

 


#NonstopMetropolis launches at the Queens Museum + Upcoming Events

This week we’re celebrating the launch of Rebecca Solnit and Joshua Jelly-Schapiro’s Nonstop Metropolis: A New York City Atlas at the Queens Museum.

For previous posts in this series, see our Nonstop Metropolis archive.


While the Nonstop Metropolis: The Remix exhibition—a multi-faceted project in collaboration with renowned writer, historian, and activist, Rebecca Solnit—has been up at the Queens Museum since Spring 2016, it continues to evolve. This past weekend was the launch event for Nonstop Metropolis: A New York City Atlas, the culminating volume in a trilogy of atlases. As described by The Village Voice, “…here is Nonstop Metropolis: A New York City Atlas to make these streets magic again. Rebecca Solnit and Joshua Jelly-Schapiro’s collection achieves the trifold purpose that all good cartography does — it’s beautiful, it inspires real thought about civic planning, and, most of all, it’s functional.”

The public event included a hands-on map-making workshop facilitated by Queens Museum educators; “Songs of the City,” a unique mix of songs and music referenced in the book; and drop-in readings of essay excerpts and signings by Rebecca Solnit, Joshua Jelly-Schapiro, Garnette Cadogan, Jonathan Tarleton, and some of the many contributors* in attendance.

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Laura Raicovich, President and Executive Director of the Queens Museums, introduces Nonstop Metropolis authors and contributors. (Photo by Pema Domingo-Barker)
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Garnette Cadogan, Nonstop Metropolis Editor-at-Large and author of the “Law of Love, Peace and Libertie” essay, appropriately, about Flushing, Queens. (Photo by Mirissa Neff, mirissaneff.com)
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Joshua Jelly-Schapiro, Garnette Cadogan, and Rebecca Solnit in the Panorama of the City of New York, on long-term view at the Queens Museum. (Photo by Mirissa Neff, mirissaneff.com)
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Sheerly Avni, author of the ‘My Yiddishe Papa’ essay in Nonstop Metropolis, addresses the crowd. (Photo by Mirissa Neff, mirissaneff.com)

For a live perspective on the event, check out the Queens Museum’s Twitter feed, and artist Peach Tao’s Tumblr telling. (Stay tuned to this space for details on her fab Shaolin creations).

 

To get a copy of Nonstop Metropolis, visit your local bookstore, or purchase online at IndieBoundAmazonBarnes & Noble, or UC Press (to save 30% on ucpress.edu, enter discount code16M4197 at checkout).

To get it signed by the the authors, upcoming Nonstop Metropolis events include:


Dance RecitalJJ SchapiroNonstop Metropolis: A New York City Atlas is the final volume in our trilogy of atlases by Rebecca Solnit, Joshua Jelly-Schapiro, Rebecca Snedeker, and a host of notable contributors. Following the publication of the critically lauded Infinite City (San Francisco) and Unfathomable City (New Orleans), we bring you this homage—and challenge—to the way we know New York City, an exquisitely designed and gorgeously illustrated atlas that excavates the many buried layers of all five boroughs of New York City and parts of New Jersey.

* The full list of contributors to Nonstop Metropolis: Sheerly Avni, Gaiutra Bahadur, Marshall Berman, Joe Boyd, Will Butler, Garnette Cadogan, Thomas J. Campanella, Daniel Aldana Cohen, Teju Cole, Joel Dinerstein, Paul La Farge, Francisco Goldman, Margo Jefferson, Lucy R. Lippard, Barry Lopez, Valeria Luiselli, Suketu Mehta, Emily Raboteau, Molly Roy, Sharifa Rhodes-Pitts, Luc Sante, Heather Smith, Jonathan Tarleton, Astra Taylor, Alexandra T. Vazquez, Christina Zanfagna, plus interviews with Valerie Capers, Peter Coyote, Grandmaster Caz, Grand Wizzard Theodore, Melle Mel, and RZA.


A visit to the Nonstop Metropolis is around the corner

Nonstop Metropolis: A New York City Atlas will soon be released into the world. To kick things off, we’ll be celebrating with a launch party in partnership with the Queens Museum on October 2, from 2–5 pm.

The launch party will feature:

  • Remarks by Queens Museum Executive Director Laura Raicovich, and Nonstop Metropolis authors Rebecca Solnit and Joshua Jelly-Schapiro.
  • Hands-on map-making workshop facilitated by Queens Museum educators.
  • “Songs of the City,” a unique mix of songs and music referenced in the book.
  • Drop-in readings of essay excerpts found in the book by Rebecca Solnit, Joshua Jelly-Schapiro, Garnette Cadogan, Jonathan Tarleton, and many other contributors.
  • Book sale and signings by the authors and contributors in attendance.
Maps from Nonstop Metropolis: A New York City Atlas in the Queens Museum’s Watershed Gallery

If you’re unable to attend on Oct. 2nd, make sure you head to the Queens Museum regardless to experience the exhibition tie-in to the book which opened in April (and is currently ongoing), “Nonstop Metropolis: The Remix.” The exhibition features original artwork by Miriam Ghani and Duke Riley, a series of on-site and off-site public programming, along with gratis map/essay broadsides excerpted from the book that are tied into the event programming.

The Queens Museum has been presenting a series of public talks, walks, and urban adventures led by the essay writers from the book, artists, and other imaginative thinkers addressing topics that include water and power, linguistic diversity in Queens, walking as an embodied act, the conjoined histories of environmental and financial disaster in Lower Manhattan, wilderness in the city, and Latino radio in NYC. There will be additional educational opportunities and map-making workshops taking place during the coming months.

The launch party at the Queens Museum isn’t the only opportunity to see Rebecca Solnit and Joshua Jelly-Schapiro (along with many of the contributors to the project) discussing Nonstop Metropolis. Events taking place throughout October include:

You can order Nonstop Metropolis at your local bookstore, Indiebound, Barnes & Noble, Amazon, or through UC Press.


Dance Recital JJ Schapiro

Nonstop Metropolis: A New York City Atlas is the final volume in our trilogy of atlases by Rebecca Solnit, Joshua Jelly-Schapiro, Rebecca Snedeker, and a host of notable contributors. Following the publication of the critically lauded Infinite City (San Francisco) and Unfathomable City (New Orleans), we bring you this homage—and challenge—to the way we know New York City, an exquisitely designed and gorgeously illustrated atlas that excavates the many buried layers of all five boroughs of New York City and parts of New Jersey.


The “Six” Boroughs: A Focus on Queens

These past several weeks we’ve revisited Infinite City and Unfathomable City, and made our first foray into New York City with the Wildlife map. Today we’re celebrating Queens, the largest (in area) of the five boroughs of New York City, home to both of New York’s international airports, and host to the Queens Museum, the hosting venue for Nonstop Metropolis: A New York City Atlastie-in exhibition, Nonstop Metropolis: The Remix. Queens’ most defining characteristic, however, is that is the most ethnically and linguistically diverse place on the earth. With this blog post, we’re going to celebrate all that makes Queens what it is.

Queue up Queens’ own, Nas, as you learn more about the borough.

Seventeenth century Queens was home to a site of early religious freedom in the United States. In 1657, 31 citizens of Flushing signed the Flushing Remonstrance, a manifesto for religious freedom under Dutch rule, stating “The law of love, peace and libertie in the states extending to Jews, Turks and Egyptians….for wee are bounde by the law of God and man to doe good unto all men and evil to noe men.” Queens’ modern diversity is reflected in the variety and number of sites of worship. Home to Buddhist temples, Hindu temples, synagogues, baptist churches, Quaker meeting houses, and more, Queens is also home to the Unisphere, the world’s largest globe, erected at the 1964 World’s Fair, dedicated to “Peace through Understanding.”

Queens is also home to more languages than any other place in the world. The Jackson Heights-Roosevelt Avenue subway station sits in the heart of America’s most linguistically diverse neighborhood: a place where people from the world’s linguistically rich countries—including India, Indonesia, Nepal, and the Philippines—converge in a single zip code.

Coptic, the last descendent of the Egyptian language of the pharaohs, has not been a language of daily life for centuries, but lives in as a liturgical language among the Egyptian Christian congregants at St. Mary and St. Antonio’s Coptic Orthodox Church.

Rikers Island, one of the world’s largest jails, holds new languages created by gangs to evade the authorities, as well as some of the first languages of the Americas, spoken by a handful of indigenous Mexican and Guatemalan prisoners who’ve effectively been stripped of their rights due to language barriers.

Mother Tongues and Queens
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These are just a few of the unique and incredible things about Queens. Nonstop Metropolis explores Queens from other angles: environmental, political, and culturally.


Nonstop Metropolis: A New York City Atlas is the final volume in our trilogy of atlases by Rebecca Solnit, Joshua Jelly-Schapiro, Rebecca Snedeker, and a host of notable contributors. Following the publication of the critically lauded Infinite City (San Francisco) and Unfathomable City (New Orleans), we bring you this homage—and challenge—to the way we know New York City, an exquisitely designed and gorgeously illustrated atlas that excavates the many buried layers of all five boroughs of New York City and parts of New Jersey. Preorder your copy today.


The Oysters in the Spire

We are excited about the forthcoming publication of Nonstop Metropolis: A New York City Atlas, the final volume in our trilogy of atlases by Rebecca Solnit, Joshua Jelly-Schapiro, and a host of notable contributors. Following the publication of the critically lauded Infinite City (San Francisco) and Unfathomable City (New Orleans), we bring you this homage—and challenge—to the way we know New York City, an exquisitely designed and gorgeously illustrated atlas that excavates the many buried layers of all five boroughs of New York City (and parts of New Jersey!). With this inaugural post, we launch a weekly series to bring you inside the books, share the process of creating them, and announce news, reviews, and events. Enjoy! We think you will appreciate it as much as we do!


The “Wildlife” map and its accompanying essay celebrate places and people who resisted and rebelled against the status quo in New York, including Angie Xtravaganza, founding member of the House of Xtravaganza, and the Chelsea piers, a free space for celebration and erotic encounters from the 1970s to the 1990s. The map juxtaposes these against the city’s elusive but omnipresent nonhuman population—the turtle species that live in Central Park, the muskrats in Lower Manhattan, and the coyotes that attended Columbia. While some wild species are on or over the brink of extinction—the endangered piping plovers at Rockaway Beach, the minks that used to be found in the Bronx—others, such as rats, cockroaches, pigeons, and bedbugs, are hardy survivors. And some—including the bulls and bears of Wall Street—exist only in our imagination. Together the map and essay explore how New York remains “a place of wildlife but also of wild life and wild lives.”

Wildlife
Click to enlarge

Our inspiration for this map was the art of Tino Rodriguez, a perpetual metamorphosis in which humans grow wings and breath takes the form of a bird and men’s bodies as well as women’s can be tender, flower-bedecked, mortal, carnal, spiritual—a world in which nothing is separated by category or species. His paintings are reminders that the natural world comes right into the city and asserts itself in a lover’s bouquet, a funeral wreath, in the ways animals furnish our imagination and the animals we catch sight of lift our spirits or break us out of our routine. This is a map about the forces that break the routines of the city, about the dissident forces that are in some ways life itself—life that existed before the orderly city of authority, outside it, despite it, and will live after it—forces that include saints and lovers, humans and animals, birdwatchers and nightclubbers.

—Rebecca Solnit and Joshua Jelly-Schapiro


Nonstop Metropolis conveys innumerable, unbound experiences of New York City through 26 imaginative maps and informative essays. Preorder your copy today.