5 High-Impact Articles in Atmospheric Science & Ocean Science

To mark the second day of Elementa: Science of the Anthropocene at the American Geophysical Union’s Fall Meeting, we are sharing the 5 most-read articles from Elementa‘s Atmospheric Science and Ocean Science domains. As you’ll see, Elementa articles have high usage, download, impact, and citation metrics (and if you’d like a more sweeping view of the journal’s overall impact, click here). By publishing your research open access in Elementa, your work could also receive high exposure (view submission information here).

For those attending #AGU17, we hope you’ll stop by booth #1820, where Elementa is featured at the DataONE/DataCite booth.


Atmospheric Science
Editor-in-Chief: Detlev Helmig, University of Colorado Boulder

5 High-Impact Articles
(All metrics from December 8, 2017. Citation Source: Scopus)

Global distribution and trends of tropospheric ozone: An observation-based review
Cooper OR, Parrish DD, Ziemke J, Balashov NV, Cupeiro M, et al. 2014.
Impact: 33,419 views/downloads, 94citations, and Altmetric Score 13 since original publication on July 10, 2014

Influence of oil and gas emissions on ambient atmospheric non-methane hydrocarbons in residential areas of Northeastern Colorado
Thompson CR, Hueber J, Helmig D. 2014.
Impact: 24,606 views/downloads, 10 citations (source: CrossRef) and Altmetric Score 14 since original publication on Nov 14, 2014

Anatomy of wintertime ozone associated with oil and natural gas extraction activity in Wyoming and Utah
Oltmans S, Schnell R, Johnson B, Pétron G, Mefford T, Neely III R. 2014.
Impact: 21,352 views/downloads, 16 citations, and Altmetric Score 4 since original publication on March 4, 2014

A characterization of Arctic aerosols on the basis of aerosol optical depth and black carbon measurements
Stone RS, Sharma S, Herber A, Eleftheriadis K, Nelson DW. 2014.
Impact: 19,782 views/downloads, 13 citations, and Altmetric Score 2 since original publication on June 10, 2014

Seasonally varying contributions to urban CO2 in the Chicago, Illinois, USA region: Insights from a high-resolution CO2 concentration and δ13C record
Moore J, Jacobson AD. 2015.
Impact: 19,444 views/downloads, 8 citations, and Altmetric Score 3 since original publication on June 5, 2015

Ocean Science
Editor-in-Chief: Jody Deming, University of Washington

5 High-Impact Articles
(All metrics from December 8, 2017. Citation Source: Scopus)

Evidence of lasting impact of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill on a deep Gulf of Mexico coral community
Hsing P, Fu B, Larcom EA, Berlet SP, Shank TM, et al. 2013.
Impact: 28,269 views/downloads, 21 citations, and Altmetric Score 17 since original publication on December 04, 2013

The evolution and future of carbonate precipitation in marine invertebrates: Witnessing extinction or documenting resilience in the Anthropocene?
Drake JL, Mass T, Falkowski PG. 2014.
Impact: 23,578 views/downloads, 8 citations, and Altmetric Score 7 since original publication on May 7, 2014

Sea ice algal biomass and physiology in the Amundsen Sea, Antarctica
Arrigo KR, Brown ZW, Mills MM. 2014.
Impact: 20,946 views/downloads, 19 citations, and Altmetric Score 4 since original publication on July 15, 2014

The changing Arctic Ocean
Arrigo KR. 2013.
Impact: 20,466 views/downloads, 6 citations, and Altmetric Score 1 since original publication on December 4, 2013

Solar energy capture and transformation in the sea
Karl DM. 2014.
Impact: 20,348 views/downloads, 11 citations, and Altmetric Score 2 since original publication on January 8, 2014


#ResearchRoundup: 8 New Articles from Elementa: Science of the Anthropocene

In this environmental science #ResearchRoundup, we are pleased to highlight 8 new articles—including select articles trending on Altmetric—published across Elementa: Science of the Anthropocene‘s comprehensive, interdisciplinary Knowledge Domains. All Elementa articles are published #OpenAccess, so be sure to visit us at elementascience.org to read more of the latest articles.

Want more information about Elementa? Join Elementa‘s mailing list and follow the journal on Facebook and Twitter for news and updates.


Atmospheric Science

Regional trend analysis of surface ozone observations from monitoring networks in eastern North America, Europe and East Asia
Kai-Lan Chang,  Irina Petropavlovskikh,  Owen R. Cooper,  Martin G. Schultz,  Tao Wang
07 Sept 2017
Special Feature: Tropospheric Ozone Assessment Report (TOAR): Global metrics for climate change, human health and crop/ecosystem research

Earth & Environmental Science

Biogeochemical characterization of municipal compost to support urban agriculture and limit childhood lead exposure from resuspended urban soils
Maia G. Fitzstevens,  Rosalie M. Sharp,  Daniel J. Brabander
11 Sept 2017

Trending article

Evolving deltas: Coevolution with engineered interventions
A. C. Welch,  R. J. Nicholls,  A. N. Lázár
25 Aug 2017
Special Feature: Deltas in the Anthropocene

 

Ocean Science

Using mineralogy and higher-level taxonomy as indicators of species sensitivity to pH: A case-study of Puget Sound
Shallin Busch,  Paul McElhany
12 Sept 2017
Special Feature: Advances in ocean acidification research

Trending article

Seasonal trends and phenology shifts in sea surface temperature on the North American northeastern continental shelf
Andrew C. Thomas,  Andrew J. Pershing,  Kevin D. Friedland,  Janet A. Nye,  Katherine E. Mills,  Michael A. Alexander,  Nicholas R. Record,  Ryan Weatherbee,  M. Elisabeth Henderson
23 Aug 2017
Special Feature: Climate change impacts: Fish, fisheries and fisheries management

Sustainable Engineering

Shipping and the environment: Smokestack emissions, scrubbers and unregulated oceanic consequences
David R. Turner,  Ida-Maja Hassellöv,  Erik Ytreberg,  Anna Rutgersson
11 Aug 2017
Special Feature: Investigating marine transport processes in the 21st century

Sustainability Transitions

Trending article

Effective inundation of continental United States communities with 21st century sea level rise
12 July 2017
Kristina A. Dahl,  Erika Spanger-Siegfried,  Astrid Caldas,  Shana Udvardy

 

Building student capacity to lead sustainability transitions in the food system through farm-based authentic research modules in sustainability sciences (FARMS)
Selena Ahmed,  Alexandra Sclafani,  Estephanie Aquino,  Shashwat Kala,  Louise Barias, Jaime Eeg
Forum: New Pathways to Sustainability in Agroecological Systems


Elementa: Science of the Anthropocene Call for Papers: Ocean Science

We invite you to submit your next paper to the Ocean Science domain of Elementa: Science of the Anthropocene, a trans-disciplinary, open-access journal whose mission is Open Science for the Public Good.

Elementa publishes original research with the ultimate objective of accelerating scientific solutions to the challenges presented by this era of human impact. It is structured into six distinct knowledge domains, and gives authors the unique opportunity to publish in one or multiple domains, helping to present their research in its broader, interconnected context.

In addition to innovative features including a value-sharing business model and an article-promotion partnership with Kudos, Elementa articles are highly used and downloaded (see highlighted articles below). For the full Elementa story, visit our website at elementascience.org.

For Elementa news and updates, be sure to follow along on Facebook and Twitter.

There has never been a more important time to ensure that transparent, evidence-based, peer-reviewed research has the widest and most impactful dissemination as possible. Please consider submitting your ocean science papers to Elementa or developing a Special Feature (e.g. ASPIRE), and feel free to get in touch with Jody Deming, University of Washington, Editor in Chief for Ocean Science, should you have any questions.


Special Features open for submissions

Impacts of natural versus anthropogenic oil inputs on the Gulf of Mexico Ecosystem
Advances in ocean acidification research
The sea surface microlayer
Oceans and human health in a changing environment
Marginal ice zone processes in the summertime Arctic
Climate change impacts: Fish, fisheries and fisheries management
Biogeochemical Exchange Processes at Sea-Ice Interfaces (BEPSII)

High-impact Ocean Science content from Elementa: Science of the Anthropocene

(All metrics from March 6, 2017)

Evidence of lasting impact of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill on a deep Gulf of Mexico coral community
Hsing P, Fu B, Larcom EA, Berlet SP, Shank TM, et al. 2013.
Total usage: 27,861 since original publication on Dec 04, 2013

The evolution and future of carbonate precipitation in marine invertebrates: Witnessing extinction or documenting resilience in the Anthropocene?
Drake JL, Mass T, Falkowski PG. 2014.
Total usage: 23,407 since original publication on May 07, 2014

The changing Arctic Ocean
Arrigo KR. 2013.
Total usage: 20,186 since original publication on Dec 04, 2013

Solar energy capture and transformation in the sea
Karl DM. 2014.
Total usage: 20,142 since original publication on Jan 08, 2014


Atmospheric Science and Ocean Science from Elementa: Science of the Anthropocene

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Moving into Day 2 of Elementa: Science of the Anthropocene at the American Geophysical Union’s Fall Meeting, we are pleased to present some highly downloaded content from our Atmospheric Science, and Ocean Science, domains.

Do you want the chance for similar exposure for your work? Submit your next article to us at www.elementascience.org or get in touch with dmorgan@ucpress.edu in the first instance, or come and see us at AGU booth 1512.


Atmospheric Science

Highlighted articles
(All metrics from December 8, 2016)

Global distribution and trends of tropospheric ozone: An observation-based review
Cooper OR, Parrish DD, Ziemke J, Balashov NV, Cupeiro M, et al. 2014.
Total views: 28,750 since original publication on July 10, 2014

Influence of oil and gas emissions on ambient atmospheric non-methane hydrocarbons in residential areas of Northeastern Colorado
Thompson CR, Hueber J, Helmig D. 2014.
Total views: 22,538 since original publication on Nov 14, 2014

Dimethyl sulfide control of the clean summertime Arctic aerosol and cloud
Leaitch WR, Sharma S, Huang L, Toom-Sauntry D, Chivulescu A, et al. 2013.
Total views: 17,585 since original publication on Dec 04, 2013

Special Feature open for submissions
Quantification of urban greenhouse gas emissions: The Indianapolis Flux experiment

Forum open for submissions
Oil and Natural Gas Development: Air Quality, Climate Science, and Policy

#####

Ocean Science

(All metrics from December 8, 2016)

Evidence of lasting impact of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill on a deep Gulf of Mexico coral community
Hsing P, Fu B, Larcom EA, Berlet SP, Shank TM, et al. 2013.
Total views: 25,644 since original publication on Dec 04, 2013

The evolution and future of carbonate precipitation in marine invertebrates: Witnessing extinction or documenting resilience in the Anthropocene?
Drake JL, Mass T, Falkowski PG. 2014.
Total views: 21,489 since original publication on May 07, 2014

The changing Arctic Ocean
Arrigo KR. 2013.
Total views: 19,168 since original publication on Dec 04, 2013

Solar energy capture and transformation in the sea
Karl DM. 2014.
Total views: 18,706 since original publication on Jan 08, 2014

Special Features open for submissions and enquiries

Impacts of natural versus anthropogenic oil inputs on the Gulf of Mexico Ecosystem

Advances in ocean acidification research

The sea surface microlayer

Oceans and human health in a changing environment

Marginal ice zone processes in the summertime Arctic

Climate change impacts: Fish, fisheries and fisheries management

Biogeochemical Exchange Processes at Sea-Ice Interfaces (BEPSII)


Jody W. Deming launches the Ocean Science domain

“I am delighted to launch the Ocean Science domain with Commentaries and Research Articles written by oceanographers who are leaders in their fields.”

I am delighted to launch the Ocean Science domain with Commentaries and Research Articles written by oceanographers who are leaders in their fields.  These writings explore the critical topics of the day, from the changing Arctic Ocean (Kevin Arrigo) to ocean acidification in the Pacific Ocean (Jeremy Mathis and Dick Feely) to the impacts of the BP oil spill on coral life in the deep Gulf of Mexico (Chuck Fisher and colleagues).  An insightful Commentary addressing energy capture by the ocean (Dave Karl) will soon be joining these lead-off pieces, with other manuscripts in the pipeline that address evolutionary responses to ocean acidification, human impacts at the river-ocean interface, and policy issues for ocean navigation.  The first special feature in the Ocean Science domain will address one of the ocean’s most productive ecosystems, where ice meets the sea in coastal Antarctica, in a linked series of articles on the project called ASPIRE (led by Tish Yager), for Amundsen Sea Polynya International Research Expedition, jointly funded by the US National Science Foundation and the Swedish Research Council. Please join us in this new, open-access, interdisciplinary and international publishing venture by submitting your research to the Ocean Science domain.

 

 


Kevin Arrigo, author of inaugural commentary “The changing Arctic Ocean” speaks with Elementa

“The commentary focuses on the dramatic
environmental changes going on in the Arctic
Ocean in recent decades and how these
changes are affecting local ecosystems.”

Please tell introduce yourself and your area of study.

I am a professor in the Department of Environmental Earth System Science at Stanford University.  I am a biological oceanographer, focusing on the study of the role of phytoplankton in the marine carbon and nitrogen cycles.  Most of my work has been done in the polar regions of both the Arctic and the Antarctic.

 

What do you focus on in ‘The changing Arctic Ocean’?

The commentary focuses on the dramatic environmental changes going on in the Arctic Ocean in recent decades and how these changes are affecting local ecosystems.  In particular, it documents how the loss of sea ice has altered the magnitude and timing of phytoplankton primary productivity, especially on the shallow continental shelves.  It also discusses what the implications of these changes are likely to be for the myriad marine ecosystems that depend on phytoplankton as a source of energy.

 

In what ways is your research significant to Ocean Science?

Ocean temperatures are increasing globally, but nowhere are these changes as rapid and as extreme as they are in the Arctic (with the possible exception of the Antarctic Peninsula).  As such, the Arctic is the bellwether for some of the ecological and biogeochemical changes that may eventually be experienced in other ocean regions as the planet continues to warm..

 

What kind of fieldwork have you carried out related to your research in the Arctic Ocean?

Members of my research group have been involved in a number of Arctic field campaigns over the past decade, including the Canadian sponsored CASES (Canadian Arctic Shelf Exchange Study) and CFL (Circumpolar Flaw Lead) programs and the US sponsored ICESCAPE program.  During these projects, our group was responsible for measuring the physiological responses of phytoplankton to variations in their light environment.  These studies are critical in that they to allow us to understand and possibly predict how phytoplankton might respond to future changes in their light environment caused by changes in sea ice cover.  Our most important discovery during these expeditions was that phytoplankton can now reach enormous numbers beneath the thinning Arctic ice cover, numbers that rival the most productive phytoplankton blooms anywhere in the world.

 

Does your research on sea ice have implications for other disciplines?

The ongoing increases in phytoplankton production has implications for disciplines as diverse as ecology, biogeochemistry, fisheries, and even atmospheric science.  Because phytoplankton convert carbon dioxide to organic carbon, they reduce surface water concentration of carbon dioxide, increasing the ability of the ocean to take up this important greenhouse gas.  Changes in the timing and magnitude of phytoplankton productivity may also impact local fisheries, albeit in ways that are as yet difficult to predict.

 

What further research do you think needs to be carried out in this specific field? Are there any large bodies of data that you feel are missing?

There are still many unanswered questions related to observed increases in primary production in Arctic waters.  How much of this food is being consumed by fish versus sinking to the sea floor and feeding bottom dwelling invertebrates?  Is the Arctic becoming a larger sink for atmospheric CO2?  How widespread are the large under-ice phytoplankton blooms that were observed in the Chukchi Sea in 2010 and 2011?  Why is production in the Arctic increasing everywhere but the Greenland Sea (where it is in decline)?  What is controlling primary production in the Arctic, light or nutrients?  These questions are of critical importance but are difficult to answer due to the relative inaccessibility of the ice-covered Arctic Ocean.  Remote sensing data can help, but much more fieldwork will be necessary to truly understand the changes going on in the Arctic today and expected in the future.

 

Read Kevin Arrigo’s commentary The changing Arctic Ocean.


The (mad) science of geoengineering: A Generation Anthropocene podcast

Caldeira-Ken

Climate scientist Ken Caldeira discusses his work with ocean acidification, and geoengineering

Published by Generation Anthropocene, April 2, 2013.

Climate scientist Ken Caldeira begins with a discussion of ocean acidification, a term he helped coin.  He follows with the story of how his name became attached to geoengineering. Ken Caldeira is a senior member of the Carnegie Institution’s Department of Global Ecology staff and a professor, by courtesy, in Stanford’s Environmental Earth System Sciences department. Professor Caldeira has a wide-spectrum approach to analyzing the world’s climate systems. He studies the global carbon cycle; marine biogeochemistry and chemical oceanography, including ocean acidification and the atmosphere/ocean carbon cycle; land-cover and climate change; the long-term evolution of climate and geochemical cycles; and energy technology. He is a lead author of the “State of the Carbon Cycle Report,” a study requested by the U.S. Congress.

Download this podcast here.

 


Why is Elementa important for Ocean Scientists? Jody Deming explains…

Jody Deming, Editor-in-Chief of Ocean Science, shares her thoughts on joining Elementa: Science of the Anthropocene.

What specific research are you currently involved with?

I am currently at the start of a 5-year international collaboration, involving Canadian, Greenlandic, and Danish scientists, that focuses on carbon cycling and transport between ocean, sea ice, snow and atmosphere in the Arctic as linked to climate change. My specific research contributions target the microbial use and respiration of various compounds produced in response to the seasonal extremes in temperature and salinity that characterize the ice and environs, using observational, experimental, and genomic approaches. We are also working on problems related to carbon flux to depth in the Arctic Ocean and on the ability of microbial inhabitants of cold waters to facilitate in situ bioremediation of organic pollutants.

 

Why do you believe research surrounding human/nature interactions within the epoch of the Anthropocene to be of significance?

We are integral components of the natural planetary ecosystem, with an ability to change this system in unprecedented ways.  As we alter the very habitat on which we depend, our ability to adapt to new conditions will determine the continued success of our species.  Research yields the knowledge essential to our ability to make effective decisions and our ability to adapt.

 

Which research within oceanography were you particularly impressed by in 2012?

Observational research demonstrating the dramatic loss of Arctic sea ice that continues to outpace model predictions; and the continued discovery of new species and biological processes in the ocean.

 

What are the main research themes you see as rapidly gaining in popularity within oceanography?

Most of these are continuing themes, but research efforts will accelerate:

  • Occurrence and impacts of extreme events emanating from the ocean, including glacial calving/melting into it, associated sea level rise, intense storms, harmful algal blooms, and oil spills
  • Impacts of sea-ice loss on marine ecosystems and human societies not only of the north but also at lower latitudes and globally
  • Passage of thresholds in temperature, pH, oxygen, and other environmental factors in the ocean, leading to shifts or losses in biodiversity and to new understanding at the genetic and mechanistic levels of biological adaptation to change
  • Alterations in the circulation of water masses and the nutrients and biota they carry, leading to ecosystem shifts
  • Discovery of new species, processes, and phenomena in the ocean that fuel imagination and innovation
  • Development and application of approaches for prioritizing and valuing services provided by the ocean and the inextricable links we have to it
  • Further probing of the history of Earth’s ocean that instructs the present and future
  • Discovery related to other oceans in the solar system, that both humble and excite the human spirit

Why do you believe Elementa to be an important new journal that researchers should be interested to publish in?

We are past the hour to bring rigorously obtained knowledge of the environment and our interactions with it as directly into the mainstream of local and global thinking as possible.  Publish in Elementa to play your part in this urgent societal goal and fully value your role as a researcher in generating new knowledge.  Make the results of your labor and insight available to the global community, freely and immediately.  Help to educate and, in turn, to advance effective decision-making and problem-solving.  Retain intellectual ownership (copyright) throughout the process.  Publish in Elementa with confidence that your work will be handled objectively and expeditiously by editors committed to the highest of academic standards, editors who will not claim the ability to pre-judge the value of the work or require that it to be reduced to a “soundbite.”

 

Why do you believe that open access is important?

In addition to my previous comments, I feel strongly about listening to the next generation of scientists who, in my experience as a professor, already find open access to be an essential aspect of the scientific endeavor.  They do not find it sufficient for scientists to reach each other through established journals and scientific societies, or for scientific knowledge to concentrate within wealthier societies.  Open access should not be some expensive option available only to those who can afford it.  High quality science needs trusted venues to distribute knowledge freely and globally.  Elementa’s Ocean Science domain will provide this venue for the ocean domain of environmental science.

 

What does your role as Editor-in-Chief involve?

My role involves engaging editors who share the overall vision of Elementa and are excited to join the open-access approach to publication of high-quality work in ocean science.  I will be working to develop a domain-specific vision based on the belief that fundamental research leads not only to new understanding but also to more effective decision-making and problem-solving, as human impacts on the ocean and the planet continue to increase.  I will actively welcome submissions that break new ground in ocean science, especially at the interface between the oceanographic subdisciplines and with other domains of Elementa, including social sciences and policy-making, for we need a merging of all of these approaches to help meet the urgent needs of human society.  Believing in the written word, I will work to ensure high quality communication of the submissions accepted for publication.