Teaching Public History with The Public Historian

For the past few months, articles from The Public Historian (TPH) have been featured in a blog series by the National Council on Public History showcasing how TPH articles have been used effectively in the classroom. With the American Studies Association conference this week, we thought it fitting to highlight the first three blog posts in the teaching series, along with their accompanying TPH articles. Learn more about The Public Historian at tph.ucpress.edu, and follow the rest of the blog series on the NCPH blog History@Work.


Exploring the historic and current landscape at Paneriai, outside Vilnius. Image credit: Aaron Shapiro

Paneriai, Poland, and “Public History and the Study of Memory”
By Aaron Shapiro

I find The Public Historian indispensable not only for keeping up with the field but also for introducing students to public history scholarship. And while I regularly assign more recent articles, I often return to David Glassberg’s “Public History and the Study of Memory” (vol. 18, no. 2, Spring 1996) in my undergraduate course, “Introduction to Public History.” Continue reading…

 

 

Scott Joplin Historic Site, St. Louis, Missouri. Photo credit: Kevin Saff, CC BY-SA 2.

Teaching uncomfortable narratives in public history courses
By Jennifer Black

…As I set to work revising my syllabus, I searched for readings that could appropriately set up public investment in the telling of history, while outlining the role of public historians in framing that narrative. I selected an article on Civil War reenactors as a lead-in to our discussion of the current flag debates, and the article by Timothy Baumann, Andrew Hurley, Valerie Altizer, and Victoria Love, “Interpreting Uncomfortable History at the Scott Joplin State Historic Site in Saint Louis, Missouri” (The Public Historian 33, no. 2 (2011): 37–66), as a bookend to the discussion. Continue reading…

 

Display from “St. Louis in the Gilded Age” exhibit, Missouri History Museum, curated by Katherine T. Corbett, St. Louis, Missouri, 1994. Photo credit: Missouri Historical Society, St. Louis.

“A Shared Inquiry into Shared Inquiry” in the public history classroom
By Jeff Manuel

When Tammy Gaskell posted to the History@Work blog asking public history educators to recommend articles from The Public Historian that work well in the classroom, I immediately replied with several options. At the top of my list was Katherine Corbett and Dick Miller’s “A Shared Inquiry into Shared Inquiry,” which appeared in the winter 2006 issue. I teach an introductory public history course at a regional public university in Illinois. Continue reading…