Celebrate #WorldCameraDay: Enter FlakPhoto’s The Polaroid Project Giveaway

Today is National Camera Day. To celebrate, we’ve teamed up with the amazing FlakPhoto to give away five copies of The Polaroid Project: At the Intersection of Art and Technology.

Photo by Andy Adams, FlakPhoto

Submission is FREE and you have three chances to win. FlakPhoto will draw 5 random winners from the comments, retweets and shares on Sunday, July 2.

Published to accompany a major traveling exhibition, The Polaroid Project is a creative exploration of the relationship between Polaroid’s many technological innovations and the art that was created with their help. Richly designed with over 300 illustrations, this impressive volume showcases not only the myriad and often idiosyncratic approaches taken by such photographers as Ansel Adams, Robert Mapplethorpe, Ellen Carey, and Chuck Close, but also a fascinating selection of the technical objects and artifacts that speak to the sheer ingenuity that lay behind the art. With essays by the exhibition’s curators and leading photographic writers and historians, The Polaroid Project provides a unique perspective on the Polaroid phenomenon — a technology, an art form, a convergence of both — and its enduring cultural legacy.

Barbara Crane, Private Views, 1981.
Dennis Hopper, Los Angeles, Back Alley, 1987.
André Kertész, August 13, 1979, 1979.
Mark Klett, Contemplating the view at Muley Point, Utah 1994, 1994.

Head over to FlakPhoto for all the giveaway details and how-to. (Psst. You can also get the scoop on a special discount to save 40% on The Polaroid Project.)

Be sure to tell your photography friends about the giveaway, and good luck!

Watch a wonderful Polaroid video and learn more about the exhibition currently on view at the Amon Carter Museum of American Art.


Nonstop Metropolis Rides the Rails

This week our Nonstop Metropolis subway campaign launched, and we need your eyes to help us locate the eye-catching ads within the MTA system.

We invite you to share your photos and tag UC Press* using the hashtag #NonstopMetropolis. By doing so, you’ll be entered to win a random drawing for a full set of the atlas trilogy: Infinite City: A San Francisco Atlas, Unfathomable City: A New Orleans Atlas, and Nonstop Metropolis: A New York City Atlas (one winner). Additionally, five lucky winners will be sent a set of map broadsides produced for the special exhibition at the Queens Museum.

Be on the lookout for both platform and in-car #NonstopMetropolis placements! Bonus appreciation points if you tag or name the station where you saw platform ads.

* Find us here:

We look forward to seeing you on the subway!

 


Uncovering Agnes Martin

For years, seeing Agnes Martin’s celebrated paintings required a pilgrimage. In the mid-1970s, a visit to Martin’s home and studio on a remote mesa in Cuba, New Mexico was not for the faint of heart: Martin could often be seen barreling across arroyos in her pick-up, rescuing lost visitors. Over time, the difficulty of seeing Martin and her paintings became part of the appeal of her work. Martin’s drawings, paintings and prints could increasingly be seen in museums in the United States and Europe, but she remained an “artist’s artist” and her critical reputation eclipsed her popular renown. For many fans of Martin’s work, including Terry Castle, who wrote of her own pilgrimage to see Martin’s paintings in Taos, Martin’s “semi-obscurity [wa]s sort of the point.”

No longer. Thanks to a recent spate of books, exhibitions, and magazine articles, Martin is finally having her moment. A long-overdue retrospective of Martin’s work, co-curated by Frances Morris and Tiffany Bell, closes at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art on September 11th and opens at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York on October 7th. The first traveling retrospective of Martin’s work since 1992/1993, the exhibition is part of a critical re-evaluation of Martin’s work and her legacy within the history of art. Indeed, three museums currently have entire rooms devoted to Martin’s paintings—the Harwood Museum; DIA:Beacon; and, most recently, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art.

For those of us who have studied Martin’s work for years, all the fuss is a welcome change. I first encountered Martin’s work in a museum’s storage room, and was struck by the care with which Martin marshaled her artistic materials to create a drawing of uncommon power and sensitivity. Who was this artist? Why wasn’t she a household name? Why was her work in storage? It certainly wasn’t a question of quality. Martin was notoriously ambivalent with regard to her views on gender and sexuality, though there is no doubt that both worked against her in the art market. And while Martin often resisted large-scale exhibitions—for years, she declined to have an exhibition at the Whitney Museum of American Art because she did not want a scholarly catalog produced—she was surprisingly savvy in the promotion of her art. To attract the notice of the New York dealer Betty Parsons in the late 1950s, for example, Martin rented an abandoned storefront outside of Taos and put up an exhibition of her own work—a solo show to compete with the best of them.

Rosenberger cover

Drawing the Line: The Early Work of Agnes Martin uncovers the ambition, determination and grit that characterized Martin’s rapid creative evolution, arguing that the germs of Martin’s artistic success can be found in her early work. It’s essential reading for anyone who visits the retrospective, and proves a useful companion for visitors who spend time with her paintings in museums across the globe. If seeing Martin’s art no longer requires a four-wheel drive vehicle, the rewards are no less spectacular.


Christina Bryan Rosenberger is an art historian living in Albuquerque, New Mexico. She is a contributor to Tate Modern’s 2015 exhibition catalogue Agnes Martin and recently wrote on Martin’s 1978 film Gabriel for Artforum. She has taught modern art at the University of New Mexico and has served as Research Coordinator for the Center for the Technical Study of Modern Art at the Harvard Art Museums.


Enter to win one of two copies of Drawing the Line: The Early Work of Agnes Martin in our Goodreads.com giveaway through August 20th.


April Goodreads Giveaways Round-Up

We’re excited to bring you more Goodreads giveaways this month! Entries are free, and all Goodreads members residing in the United States are eligible to win. Just click to enter!  Be sure to visit our Goodreads profile often, as new giveaways will be appearing every month– and don’t forget to review, rate, and add your favorite UC Press books to your Goodreads shelves.

Check out the following giveaways for new and upcoming Press books.

 

The New Mediterranean Jewish Table: Old World Recipes for the Modern Home
 
by Joyce Goldstein 

(click for Goodreads giveaway)

The New Mediterranean Jewish Table is an authoritative guide to Jewish home cooking from North Africa, Italy, Greece, Turkey, Spain, Portugal, and the Middle East. It is a treasury filled with vibrant, seasonal recipes—both classic and updated—that embrace fresh fruits and vegetables; grains and legumes; small portions of meat, poultry, and fish; and a healthy mix of herbs and spices. It is also the story of how Jewish cooks successfully brought the local ingredients, techniques, and traditions of their new homelands into their kitchens. With this varied and appealing selection of Mediterranean Jewish recipes, Joyce Goldstein promises to inspire new generations of Jewish and non-Jewish home cooks alike with dishes for everyday meals and holiday celebrations.

(Giveaway ends on May 8th.)

 

Hiding in Plain Sight: The Pursuit of War Criminals from Nuremberg to the War on Terror by Eric Stover and Victor Peskin

(click for Goodreads giveaway)

Hiding in Plain Sight tells the story of the global effort to apprehend the world’s most wanted fugitives. Beginning with the flight of tens of thousands of Nazi war criminals and their collaborators after World War II, then moving on to the question of justice following the recent Balkan wars and the Rwandan genocide, and ending with the establishment of the International Criminal Court and America’s pursuit of suspected terrorists in the aftermath of 9/11, the book explores the range of diplomatic and military strategies—both successful and unsuccessful—that states and international courts have adopted to pursue and capture war crimes suspects. It is a story fraught with broken promises, backroom politics, ethical dilemmas, and daring escapades—all in the name of international justice and human rights.

(Giveaway ends on May 8th.)

 

Rembrandt: The Painter Thinking by Ernst van der Wetering

(click for Goodreads giveaway)

Even during the artist’s lifetime, contemporary art lovers considered Rembrandt van Rijn to be an exceptional artist. In this revelatory sequel to the acclaimed Rembrandt: The Painter at Work, renowned Rembrandt authority Ernst van de Wetering investigates precisely why the artist, from a very early age, was praised by prominent connoisseurs. He argues that Rembrandt, from his very first endeavors in painting, embarked on a journey past all the foundations of the art of painting that, according to (up until now misinterpreted) contemporary written sources, were considered essential in the seventeenth century. Rembrandt never stopped searching for solutions to the pictorial problems that confronted him; this led over time to radical changes in course that can’t simply be attributed to stylistic evolution or natural development. In a quest as rigorous and novel as the artist’s, van de Wetering reveals how Rembrandt became the best painter the world had ever seen. Gorgeously illustrated throughout, this groundbreaking exploration reconstructs Rembrandt’s closely guarded theories and methods, shedding new light both on the artist’s exceptional accomplishments and on the practice of painting in the Dutch Golden Age.

(Giveaway ends on April 18th.)

 

Living at the Edges of Capitalism: Adventures in Exile and Mutual Aid by Andrej Grubacic and Denis O’Hearn

(click for Goodreads giveaway)

Inspired by their experiences visiting Cossacks, living with the Zapatistas, and developing connections and relationships with prisoners and ex-prisoners, Andrej Grubacic and Denis O’Hearn present a uniquely sweeping, historical, and systematic study of exilic communities engaged in mutual aid. Following the tradition of Peter Kropotkin, Pierre Clastres, James Scott, Fernand Braudel and Imanuel Wallerstein, this study examines the full historical and contemporary possibilities for establishing self-governing communities at the edges of the capitalist world-system, considering the historical forces that often militate against those who try to practice mutual aid in the face of state power and capitalist incursion.

(Giveaway ends on May 8th.)

 

The Teachings of Don Juan: A Yaqui Way of Knowledge
by Carlos Castaneda

(click for Goodreads giveaway)

In 1968 University of California Press published an unusual manuscript by an anthropology student named Carlos Castaneda. The Teachings of Don Juan enthralled a generation of seekers dissatisfied with the limitations of the Western worldview. Castaneda’s now classic book remains controversial for the alternative way of seeing that it presents and the revolution in cognition it demands. Whether read as ethnographic fact or creative fiction, it is the story of a remarkable journey that has left an indelible impression on the life of more than a million readers around the world.

(Giveaway ends on May 8th.)

 

Puja and Piety: Hindu, Jain, and Buddhist Art from the Indian Subcontinent edited by Pratapaditya Pal

(click for Goodreads giveaway)

Puja and Piety celebrates the complexity of South Asian representation and iconography by examining the relationship between aesthetic expression and the devotional practice, or puja, in the three native religions of the Indian subcontinent. This stunning and authoritative catalogue presents some 150 objects created over the past two millennia for temples, home worship, festivals, and roadside shrines. From monumental painted temple hangings and painted meditation diagrams to portable pictures for pilgrims, from stone sculptures to processional bronzes and wooden chariots, from ancient terracottas to various devotional objects for domestic shrines, this volume provides much-needed context and insight into classical and popular art of India. Featuring an introduction by the eminent art historian and curator Pratapaditya Pal; accessible essays on each religious tradition by Stephen P. Huyler, John E. Cort, and Christian Luczanits; and useful guides to iconography and terms by Debashish Banerji, this richly illustrated catalogue will provide a lasting resource for readers interested in South Asian art and spirituality.

(Giveaway ends on May 8th.)

 


Goodreads Giveaways: Books for Black History Month

We’re excited to bring you more Goodreads giveaways this month! Entries are free, and all Goodreads members residing in the United States are eligible to win. Just click to enter! Be sure to visit our Goodreads profile often, as new giveaways will be appearing every month– and don’t forget to review, rate, and add your favorite UC Press books to your Goodreads shelves.

Check out these new UC Press titles, and learn more about the history of African-Americans even after February is over.

The Scholar Denied: W. E. B. Du Bois and the Birth of Modern Sociology by Aldon Morris

Winner of the 2016 R.R. Hawkins Award of the 2016 PROSE Awards 

(click for Goodreads giveaway)

In this groundbreaking book, Aldon D. Morris’s ambition is truly monumental: to help rewrite the history of sociology and to acknowledge the primacy of W. E. B. Du Bois’s work in the founding of the discipline. (Giveaway begins on February 17th and ends on March 17th.)

Letters from Langston: From the Harlem Renaissance to the Red Scare and Beyond edited by Evelyn Louise Crawford, MaryLouise Patterson, and Robin D.G. Kelley

(click for Goodreads giveaway)

Accessible, personal, and inspirational, Hughes’s poems portray the African American community in struggle in the context of a turbulent modern United States and a rising black freedom movement. This indispensable volume of letters between Hughes and four leftist confidants sheds vivid light on his life and politics. (Giveaway ends on February 18th.)

Stealing the Show: African American Performers and Audiences in 1930s Hollywood by Miriam J. Petty

(click for Goodreads giveaway)

Stealing the Show is a study of African American actors in Hollywood during the 1930s, a decade that saw the consolidation of stardom as a potent cultural and industrial force. Petty focuses on five performers whose Hollywood film careers flourished during this period to reveal the “problematic stardom” and the enduring, interdependent patterns of performance and spectatorship for performers and audiences of color. (Giveaway begins on February 17th and ends on March 17th.)

Procession: The Art of Norman Lewis by Ruth Fine

(click for Goodreads giveaway)

This beautifully illustrated catalogue accompanies the first major museum retrospective of the painter Norman Lewis (1909–1979). Lewis was the sole African American artist of his generation who became committed to issues of abstraction at the start of his career and continued to explore them over its entire trajectory. This is a milestone in Lewis scholarship and a vital resource for future study of the artist and abstraction in his period.

(Giveaway begins on February 17th and ends on March 17th.)

Better Git It in Your Soul: An Interpretive Biography of Charles Mingus by Krin Gabbard

(click for Goodreads giveaway)

Gabbard sets aside the myth-making and convincingly argues that Charles Mingus created a unique language of emotions—and not just in music. Capturing many essential moments in jazz history anew, Better Git It in Your Soul will fascinate anyone who cares about jazz, African American history, and the artist’s life.

(Giveaway begins on February 17th and ends on March 17th.)


Enter to win free books for #WorldArchitectureDay

We are closing out World Architecture Day with a book giveaway!

There are four ways you can enter to win:

  1. Share your favorite example of urban architecture in a comment on this post below
  2. Share your favorite example of urban architecture on Facebook
  3. Tweet your favorite example of urban architecture to us at @educatedarts. Use #WDA2014 if you can
  4. Subscribe to our monthly Art eNews TODAY

Four winners total (one from each method of entry) will be chosen randomly*, and notified to select their title of choice from the following list:

·      Into the Void Pacific: Building the 1939 San Francisco World’s Fair by Andrew Shanken

·      Schindler, Kings Road, and Southern California Modernism by Robert Sweeney & Judith Sheine

·      The Prehistory of Home by Jerry D. Moore

·      White Cube, Green Maze: New Art Landscapes by Raymund Ryan

Good luck!

* Duplicate entries will not be counted, though you can enter to win via any and all of the allowed methods.

 


Win a Copy of Tracks and Shadows

Tracks and ShadowsPublishers Weekly calls it “Achingly beautiful” and Jim Harrison says it’s “an immediate classic.” Tracks and Shadows is both an absorbing autobiography of a celebrated field biologist and a celebration of beauty in nature. Harry W. Greene, award-winning author of Snakes: The Evolution of Mystery in Nature, delves into the poetry of field biology, showing how nature eases our existential quandaries. More than a memoir, the book is about the wonder of snakes, the beauty of studying and understanding natural history, and the importance of sharing the love of nature with humanity.

We’re giving away three copies of the book over at Goodreads. The contest runs through November 18 and is open to entries from the US and UK. Good luck!