Jason De Leon Wins the 2018 J.I. Staley Book Prize

We’re pleased to announce that Jason De Leon, author of The Land of Open Graves: Living and Dying on the Migrant Trail is the winner of the 2018 J.I. Staley Book Prize presented by the School of Advanced Research.

The J.I. Staley Book Prize carries a cash award of $7,500 and seeks to recognize groundbreaking works and authors in the field of anthropology.

“Through an examination of the experience of undocumented migrants moving across the U.S.-Mexican border, Jason De León’s The Land of Open Graves integrates archaeological and ethnographic techniques to expose a central tragedy of border-protection policies that turn the harsh Sonoran desert environment into a zone of death. His prose, by turns clinical and intimate, draws readers into a politicized landscape and offers the vivid testimony of people who have survived their desert crossing.  Using forensic techniques and the photographs of Michael Wells and others, De León also reconstructs the stories of those who perished, in the process inventing an experimental archaeology of the present.  A powerful work of witnessing, The Land of Open Graves has profound relevance in an era of vast social displacement and global migration.” – 2018 J.I. Staley Prize Committee

Learn more about Jason and his work with The Undocumented Migration Project here.

Many congratulations to Prof. De Leon!


Congratulations to our 2017 AAA Award Winners!

UC Press is honored to have numerous authors among the award winners at the 2017 American Anthropological Association conference. Please join us in congratulating the following #AmAnth17 award winners.

Jason DeLeon, The Land of Open Graves: Living and Dying on the Migrant Trail

  • 2017 MacArthur Fellowship presented by the Jonathan D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation
  • 2017 Delmos Jones and Jagna Sharf Memorial Prize for the Critical Study of North America presented by the Society for the Anthropology of North America

 

  • 2017 Robert B. Textor and Family Book Prize for Excellence in Anticipatory Anthropology presented by the American Anthropological Association
  • Honorable Mention, 2017 Delmos Jones and Jagna Sharf Memorial Prize for the Critical Study of North America presented by the Society for the Anthropology of North America

 

  • 2017 Sharon Stephens Prize presented by the American Ethnological Society

 

 

 

  • 2017 Michelle Z. Rosaldo Book Prize presented by the Association for Feminist Anthropology

 

 

 

  • Honorable Mention, 2017 Victor Turner Book Prize presented by the American Anthropological Association

 

 

Angela Stuesse, Scratching Out a Living: Latinos, Race, and Work in the Deep South

  • 2017 C.L.R. James Book Award presented by the Working Class Studies Association
  • 2017 Book Prize Winner presented by the Society for Latin American and Caribbean Anthropology

 

 

 

Stefan Helmreich, Alien Ocean: Anthropological Voyages in Microbial Seas

  • 2017 J. I. Staley Prize presented by the Society for Advanced Research

 

 

 

Christiana Giordano, Migrants in Translation: Caring and the Logics of Difference in Contemporary Italy

  • Second Place, 2016 Victor Turner Book Prize presented by the American Anthropological Association

2017 Kraszna-Krausz Book Award Winners

We’re delighted to announce that multiple UC Press titles have been recognized at this year’s Kraszna-Krausz Foundation Book Awards! Celebrating excellence in photography and moving image publishing, the KKF Awards are the UK’s leading prizes for books published in the fields of photography and the moving image (including film, television and new media).

This year, we’re pleased to share that Anatomy of Sound: Norman Corwin and Media Authorship, edited by Jacob Smith and Neil Verma, has been selected for the Kraszna-Krausz Best Moving Image Book award for 2017.

“At long last, the most important radio auteur of the twentieth century (and a gifted screenwriter to boot) has received the attention he deserves. This book is not only an indispensable guide to Norman Corwin’s work but also a foundational study of the aesthetics and politics of radio and screen.” —James Naremore, author of An Invention without a Future: Essays on Cinema

       
 

Other UC Press finalists include:

These titles, along with the other Moving Image award finalists, will be among the books exhibited at the Somerset House during the Photo London Exhibition this month.

Many congratulations to our authors, and to all other authors recognized at this year’s awards!

See the selection of UC Press titles that were recognized last year.


Celebrating the City: Photos from the MAS NYC Awards Ceremony

What a night! On Monday evening, the Municipal Art Society of New York honored Nonstop Metropolis: A New York City Atlas and editors Rebecca Solnit and Joshua Jelly-Schapiro with the Brendan Gill Prize. Praising the contributions of all who worked on the book, the jury recognized the project’s rich and varied social histories, stating, “By inviting a diverse host of collaborators to contribute to this beautifully plural portrait of our urban archipelago, the book resonates the resiliency of the myriad of communities that contribute to our city’s dynamism.”

The editors were presented with the award at the Celebrating the City ceremony, with Rebecca appearing by video from her San Francisco home, and Joshua on site to accept the award in his home city. Check out the photos from the event below! (Photos by: Vlad Weinstein)

Continue reading “Celebrating the City: Photos from the MAS NYC Awards Ceremony”


Worldly Affiliations Wins the 2017 Bernard S. Cohn Book Prize

We are delighted to announce that Sonal Khullar was awarded the Bernard S. Cohn Book Prize for her book, Worldly Affiliations: Artistic Practice, National Identity, and Modernism in India, 1930-1990 on behalf of the Association for Asian Studies’ South Asia Council.

9780520283671

The Bernard S. Cohn Book Prize each year honors outstanding and innovative scholarship across discipline and country of specialization for a first single-authored monograph on South Asia, published during the preceding year.

Published by the press in 2015, Worldly Affiliations: Artistic Practice, National Identity, and Modernism in India, 1930-1990 has received considerable praise from reviewers, and we’re proud that Sonal’s work has earned this significant recognition.

“Beautifully written, compellingly argued, Khullar’s book not only offers a major contribution to the study of Indian modernism, it also advances our methodological understanding of modern art at large. A vital addition to an exciting body of emerging art-historical scholarship that promises to fundamentally transform received ideas on modernism in the coming years.”—Iftikhar Dadi, Cornell University

“Provocatively argued, this book is a must-read for art students, critics, and all those who are interested in modern Indian art, as well as all concerned with global modernism.”—Partha Mitter, University of Sussex


Judaisms: Finalist in the 2016 National Jewish Book Awards

Aaron J. Hahn Tapper’s book, Judaisms: A Twenty-First-Century Introduction to Jews and Jewish Identities, was selected by the Jewish Book Council as a finalist for the Dorothy Kripke Award for Education and Jewish Identity as part of the 2016 Jewish Book Awards.

The Jewish Book Council, dating back to 1925, is one of the oldest organizations providing continual service to the American Jewish community. Additionally, the National Jewish Book Awards, which began in 1950, is the longest running awards program of its kind in the field of Jewish literature and is recognized as the most prestigious, giving recognition to outstanding books.

In their review of Judaisms, the Jewish Book Council had this to say:

Judaisms: A Twenty-First-Century Introduction to Jews and Jewish Identities by Aaron J. Hahn Tapper is a lively and comprehensive college textbook on the Jewish experience in the United States and Israel. . . . a visually attractive book that will appeal to Jew and non-Jew alike. It is filled with fascinating information and can be used as a reference book or read in its entirety.

Read the full review here, and learn more about the awards and the full results here. Many congratulations to Aaron and the rest of this year’s NJBA finalists and winners!


Award Winning UC Press Authors at the American Anthropological Association

UC Press is proud to be part of the AAUP’s fifth annual University Press Week. Check out our blog and social media channels through Nov. 19th (plus follow hashtags #ReadUp #UPWeek), and learn how we, along with 40 of our scholarly press colleagues, work diligently to publish vital works benefitting educational, specialized research, and general interest communities.

As the 2016 American Anthropological Association meeting begins, we’re pleased to congratulate four of our authors for the following illustrious award wins! These will be given in person at the annual meeting this week.

9780520282759

MW DeLeon Portrait (1)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jason DeLeon, author of The Land of Open Graves: Living and Dying on the Migrant Trail is the recipient of the 2016 Margaret Mead Award. Here is what committee members had to say about his book:

This is an incredibly innovative book.  It combines data and analysis from three sub-fields—archaeology, biological anthropology, cultural anthropology.  There is also innovative ethnography.  The theory is new—starting with INS change of policy in order to use the environment as a deterrent and going on to the notion of the hybrid collective. It covers a whole new range of insights in the border between the US and Mexico and undocumented immigrants—a very important issue at this time.

The book includes a fictionalized account of the migrant trail, through which we are introduced to the “everyday terror of the desert”; extended transcripts of conversations with De León’s primary informants and friends; De León’s interspersed scholarship across anthropological fields that contextualizes narratives and conversations; vivid ethnography; the stark photographs by Mike Wells and the author; and the strong discussions on ethics (ethnographic and political), structural violence, inequality and racism. The book is gripping to read, and devastating and haunting.

9780520275140holmes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Seth Holmes, author of Fresh Fruit, Broken Bodies: Migrant Farmworkers in the United States, is the winner of the 2016 Robert B. Textor and Family Prize for Excellence in Anticipatory Anthropology. Seth’s work was described as “a trenchant ethnography that offers new possibilities for an engaged, empathic anthropology.”

9780520287211

Stuesse (NS)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Angela Steusse, author of Scratching Out a Living: Latinos, Race, and Work in the Deep South, is the winner of the 2016 Society for the Anthropology of Work Book Prize. 

9780520285996

fuentes_a

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Augustin Fuentes, author of Race, Monogamy, and Other Lies They Told You: Busting Myths about Human Nature, is the winner of the 2016 W. W. Howells Book Award in Biological Anthropology. 

9780520287266

Roberto Gonzales, Social Work faculty working with undocumented young adults,

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Roberto G. Gonzales, author of Lives in Limbo: Undocumented and Coming of Age in America, is the winner of the 2016 Latina and Latino Anthropologists Book Award.

Many congratulations, once again, to our authors: we’re proud to have published with them!


Appealing to Justice wins the 2016 Sutherland Book Award

We’re pleased to announce that Kitty Calavita and Valerie Jenness have won the 2016 Sutherland Book Award for the Society for the Study of Social Problem’s Law and Society Division for their book, Appealing to Justice: Prisoner Grievances, Rights, and Carceral Logic.

The Sutherland Book Award recognizes the best book in the category of law and society scholarship over the last two years; according to the division’s mission statement, the Law and Society division of the SSSP “focuses on the role of law as both a barrier to and a tool for change toward a more just, democratic and humane world”.

The authors will be officially honored with the award and presented with a plaque at the SSSP’s annual meeting in Seattle, Washington later this year.

Many congratulations to our authors– we are honored to have published with them!


Creating a Common Polity wins the SCS 2015 Goodwin Award

UC Press is pleased to share the Society for Classical Studies (SCS) announcement that Emily Mackil’s book, Creating a Common Polity: Religion, Economy, and Politics in the Making of the Greek Koinon, will receive the 2015 Goodwin Award—the group’s top prize.

The SCS, in the official announcement, recognizes the work as “a model of what scholarship in ancient history should ideally be: technically impeccable, theoretically bold and imaginative, rigorously argued, and—not least—a pleasure for both experts and novices to read.”

     
 

Additionally, we are extremely proud of the continued recognition of the books in our program with Susanna Elm’s Sons of Hellenism, Fathers of the Church: Emperor Julian, Gregory of Nazianzus, and the Vision of Rome and Tim Whitmarsh’s Beyond a Second Sophistic: Adventures in Greek Postclassicism winning in 2013 and 2014, respectively.

Many congratulations to our authors and their winning titles! Remember to visit us at Booth 108 at the Society for Classical Studies annual meeting to view copies of these books and more.


Honoring 3 Award-Winning Titles on Agriculture, Labor and Justice from UC Press

UC Press is home to one of the oldest and most prestigious lists in Food Studies, an interdisciplinary field that brings together scholars from diverse backgrounds to examine the role and impact of food consumption and production. Many of our authors, like Marion Nestle and Janet Poppendieck, highlight and challenge the food industry’s negative impact on health and the environment.

Today, the conversation about what constitutes “just food” has moved beyond talking solely about eating organic and local. Building on Julie Guthman’s seminal work Agrarian Dreams: The Paradox of Organic Farming in Californiaa new generation of scholars is turning its attention to labor justice in the agricultural sector. Three new UC Press books from Sarah Besky, Margaret Gray, and Seth Holmes take on the issue of agricultural labor and all have received major society awards in recognition for their important work.

Sarah Besky’s The Darjeeling Distinction: Labor and Justice on Fair-Trade Tea Plantations in India is the first book to explore how fair trade operates on large plantations. The global demand for fair trade and organic tea is increasing, yet workers on plantations experience justice in uneven and contradictory ways. For her rigorous ethnography, Besky will be awarded the Society for Economic Anthropology Book Prize at the annual American Anthropological Association meeting.

Margaret Gray, author of Labor and the Locavore: Building a Comprehensive Food Ethic offers a revealing look at labor practices in Hudson Valley, New York. Despite Hudson Valley’s reputation as the bucolic landscape from which much of New York City’s local food is grown, it’s a region rife with labor conflict and abuse. The author challenges us to bring labor justice into the food justice movement. Labor and the Locavore won the annual Association for the Study of Food and Society 2014 Book Prize. It was also named co-winner of the Best Book Award from Labor Project from the American Political Science Association.

In his gripping book Fresh Fruit, Broken Bodies: Migrant Farmworkers in the United States, anthropologist Seth Holmes exposes the violence experienced by migrant laborers today. Fresh Fruit, Broken Bodies was honored with the Association for Humanist Sociology Book Award, the New Millennium Book Award from the Society for Medical Anthropology, and the Anthropology of Work Book Award from the Society for the Anthropology of Work, among other awards.

Congratulations Sarah Besky, Margaret Gray, and Seth Holmes!