5 High-Impact Articles in Atmospheric Science & Ocean Science

To mark the second day of Elementa: Science of the Anthropocene at the American Geophysical Union’s Fall Meeting, we are sharing the 5 most-read articles from Elementa‘s Atmospheric Science and Ocean Science domains. As you’ll see, Elementa articles have high usage, download, impact, and citation metrics (and if you’d like a more sweeping view of the journal’s overall impact, click here). By publishing your research open access in Elementa, your work could also receive high exposure (view submission information here).

For those attending #AGU17, we hope you’ll stop by booth #1820, where Elementa is featured at the DataONE/DataCite booth.


Atmospheric Science
Editor-in-Chief: Detlev Helmig, University of Colorado Boulder

5 High-Impact Articles
(All metrics from December 8, 2017. Citation Source: Scopus)

Global distribution and trends of tropospheric ozone: An observation-based review
Cooper OR, Parrish DD, Ziemke J, Balashov NV, Cupeiro M, et al. 2014.
Impact: 33,419 views/downloads, 94citations, and Altmetric Score 13 since original publication on July 10, 2014

Influence of oil and gas emissions on ambient atmospheric non-methane hydrocarbons in residential areas of Northeastern Colorado
Thompson CR, Hueber J, Helmig D. 2014.
Impact: 24,606 views/downloads, 10 citations (source: CrossRef) and Altmetric Score 14 since original publication on Nov 14, 2014

Anatomy of wintertime ozone associated with oil and natural gas extraction activity in Wyoming and Utah
Oltmans S, Schnell R, Johnson B, Pétron G, Mefford T, Neely III R. 2014.
Impact: 21,352 views/downloads, 16 citations, and Altmetric Score 4 since original publication on March 4, 2014

A characterization of Arctic aerosols on the basis of aerosol optical depth and black carbon measurements
Stone RS, Sharma S, Herber A, Eleftheriadis K, Nelson DW. 2014.
Impact: 19,782 views/downloads, 13 citations, and Altmetric Score 2 since original publication on June 10, 2014

Seasonally varying contributions to urban CO2 in the Chicago, Illinois, USA region: Insights from a high-resolution CO2 concentration and δ13C record
Moore J, Jacobson AD. 2015.
Impact: 19,444 views/downloads, 8 citations, and Altmetric Score 3 since original publication on June 5, 2015

Ocean Science
Editor-in-Chief: Jody Deming, University of Washington

5 High-Impact Articles
(All metrics from December 8, 2017. Citation Source: Scopus)

Evidence of lasting impact of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill on a deep Gulf of Mexico coral community
Hsing P, Fu B, Larcom EA, Berlet SP, Shank TM, et al. 2013.
Impact: 28,269 views/downloads, 21 citations, and Altmetric Score 17 since original publication on December 04, 2013

The evolution and future of carbonate precipitation in marine invertebrates: Witnessing extinction or documenting resilience in the Anthropocene?
Drake JL, Mass T, Falkowski PG. 2014.
Impact: 23,578 views/downloads, 8 citations, and Altmetric Score 7 since original publication on May 7, 2014

Sea ice algal biomass and physiology in the Amundsen Sea, Antarctica
Arrigo KR, Brown ZW, Mills MM. 2014.
Impact: 20,946 views/downloads, 19 citations, and Altmetric Score 4 since original publication on July 15, 2014

The changing Arctic Ocean
Arrigo KR. 2013.
Impact: 20,466 views/downloads, 6 citations, and Altmetric Score 1 since original publication on December 4, 2013

Solar energy capture and transformation in the sea
Karl DM. 2014.
Impact: 20,348 views/downloads, 11 citations, and Altmetric Score 2 since original publication on January 8, 2014


#ResearchRoundup: 8 New Articles from Elementa: Science of the Anthropocene

In this environmental science #ResearchRoundup, we are pleased to highlight 8 new articles—including select articles trending on Altmetric—published across Elementa: Science of the Anthropocene‘s comprehensive, interdisciplinary Knowledge Domains. All Elementa articles are published #OpenAccess, so be sure to visit us at elementascience.org to read more of the latest articles.

Want more information about Elementa? Join Elementa‘s mailing list and follow the journal on Facebook and Twitter for news and updates.


Atmospheric Science

Regional trend analysis of surface ozone observations from monitoring networks in eastern North America, Europe and East Asia
Kai-Lan Chang,  Irina Petropavlovskikh,  Owen R. Cooper,  Martin G. Schultz,  Tao Wang
07 Sept 2017
Special Feature: Tropospheric Ozone Assessment Report (TOAR): Global metrics for climate change, human health and crop/ecosystem research

Earth & Environmental Science

Biogeochemical characterization of municipal compost to support urban agriculture and limit childhood lead exposure from resuspended urban soils
Maia G. Fitzstevens,  Rosalie M. Sharp,  Daniel J. Brabander
11 Sept 2017

Trending article

Evolving deltas: Coevolution with engineered interventions
A. C. Welch,  R. J. Nicholls,  A. N. Lázár
25 Aug 2017
Special Feature: Deltas in the Anthropocene

 

Ocean Science

Using mineralogy and higher-level taxonomy as indicators of species sensitivity to pH: A case-study of Puget Sound
Shallin Busch,  Paul McElhany
12 Sept 2017
Special Feature: Advances in ocean acidification research

Trending article

Seasonal trends and phenology shifts in sea surface temperature on the North American northeastern continental shelf
Andrew C. Thomas,  Andrew J. Pershing,  Kevin D. Friedland,  Janet A. Nye,  Katherine E. Mills,  Michael A. Alexander,  Nicholas R. Record,  Ryan Weatherbee,  M. Elisabeth Henderson
23 Aug 2017
Special Feature: Climate change impacts: Fish, fisheries and fisheries management

Sustainable Engineering

Shipping and the environment: Smokestack emissions, scrubbers and unregulated oceanic consequences
David R. Turner,  Ida-Maja Hassellöv,  Erik Ytreberg,  Anna Rutgersson
11 Aug 2017
Special Feature: Investigating marine transport processes in the 21st century

Sustainability Transitions

Trending article

Effective inundation of continental United States communities with 21st century sea level rise
12 July 2017
Kristina A. Dahl,  Erika Spanger-Siegfried,  Astrid Caldas,  Shana Udvardy

 

Building student capacity to lead sustainability transitions in the food system through farm-based authentic research modules in sustainability sciences (FARMS)
Selena Ahmed,  Alexandra Sclafani,  Estephanie Aquino,  Shashwat Kala,  Louise Barias, Jaime Eeg
Forum: New Pathways to Sustainability in Agroecological Systems


Elementa: Science of the Anthropocene Call for Papers: Atmospheric Science

We invite you to submit your next paper to the Atmospheric Science domain of Elementa: Science of the Anthropocene, a trans-disciplinary, open-access journal whose mission is Open Science for the Public Good.

Elementa publishes original research with the ultimate objective of accelerating scientific solutions to the challenges presented by this era of human impact. Structured into six distinct knowledge domains, the Atmospheric Science domain is dedicated to research on the impacts of human activities and the natural state of the Earth’s atmosphere. Elementa invites original research manuscripts that investigate chemical and physical atmospheric properties encompassing natural processes, perturbations, and assessment of future conditions. Elementa, in particular, strives to become a home for publications on societal impacts of atmospheric conditions and processes, for policy-relevant research findings, and for work that directs and nurtures the path towards a sustainable Earth Atmosphere. To attain this goal, submissions going beyond traditional disciplinary borders are welcome.

For the full Aims & Scope of the Atmospheric Science domain, please click here.

In addition to innovative features including a value-sharing business model and an article-promotion partnership with Kudos, Elementa articles are highly used and downloaded (see highlighted articles below). For the full Elementa story, visit our website at elementascience.org.

For Elementa news and updates, be sure to follow along on Facebook and Twitter.

There has never been a more important time to ensure that transparent, evidence-based, peer-reviewed research has the widest and most impactful dissemination as possible. Please consider submitting your Atmospheric Science papers to Elementa or developing a Special Feature or Forum, and feel free to get in touch with Detlev Helmig, University of Colorado Boulder, Editor in Chief for Atmospheric Science, should you have any questions.


Special Features and Forums open for submissions

Quantification of urban greenhouse gas emissions: The Indianapolis Flux experiment
Reactive Gases in the Global Atmosphere
Oil and Natural Gas Development: Air Quality, Climate Science, and Policy

High-impact Atmospheric Science content from Elementa: Science of the Anthropocene

(All metrics from April 13, 2017)

Analysis of local-scale background concentrations of methane and other gas-phase species in the Marcellus Shale
Goetz, J. Douglas, et al.
Total usage: 1,101 views/downloads since original publication on February 9, 2017

Global distribution and trends of tropospheric ozone: An observation-based review
Cooper OR, Parrish DD, Ziemke J, Balashov NV, Cupeiro M, et al. 2014.
Total usage: 31,188 views/downloads and 24 citations since original publication on July 10, 2014

Influence of oil and gas emissions on ambient atmospheric non-methane hydrocarbons in residential areas of Northeastern Colorado
Thompson CR, Hueber J, Helmig D. 2014.
Total usage: 24,420 views/downloads and 10 citations since original publication on Nov 14, 2014

Dimethyl sulfide control of the clean summertime Arctic aerosol and cloud
Leaitch WR, Sharma S, Huang L, Toom-Sauntry D, Chivulescu A, et al. 2013.
Total usage: 19,151 views/downloads and 8 citations since original publication on Dec 04, 2013


Atmospheric Science and Ocean Science from Elementa: Science of the Anthropocene

elementa-pantone (1)

Moving into Day 2 of Elementa: Science of the Anthropocene at the American Geophysical Union’s Fall Meeting, we are pleased to present some highly downloaded content from our Atmospheric Science, and Ocean Science, domains.

Do you want the chance for similar exposure for your work? Submit your next article to us at www.elementascience.org or get in touch with dmorgan@ucpress.edu in the first instance, or come and see us at AGU booth 1512.


Atmospheric Science

Highlighted articles
(All metrics from December 8, 2016)

Global distribution and trends of tropospheric ozone: An observation-based review
Cooper OR, Parrish DD, Ziemke J, Balashov NV, Cupeiro M, et al. 2014.
Total views: 28,750 since original publication on July 10, 2014

Influence of oil and gas emissions on ambient atmospheric non-methane hydrocarbons in residential areas of Northeastern Colorado
Thompson CR, Hueber J, Helmig D. 2014.
Total views: 22,538 since original publication on Nov 14, 2014

Dimethyl sulfide control of the clean summertime Arctic aerosol and cloud
Leaitch WR, Sharma S, Huang L, Toom-Sauntry D, Chivulescu A, et al. 2013.
Total views: 17,585 since original publication on Dec 04, 2013

Special Feature open for submissions
Quantification of urban greenhouse gas emissions: The Indianapolis Flux experiment

Forum open for submissions
Oil and Natural Gas Development: Air Quality, Climate Science, and Policy

#####

Ocean Science

(All metrics from December 8, 2016)

Evidence of lasting impact of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill on a deep Gulf of Mexico coral community
Hsing P, Fu B, Larcom EA, Berlet SP, Shank TM, et al. 2013.
Total views: 25,644 since original publication on Dec 04, 2013

The evolution and future of carbonate precipitation in marine invertebrates: Witnessing extinction or documenting resilience in the Anthropocene?
Drake JL, Mass T, Falkowski PG. 2014.
Total views: 21,489 since original publication on May 07, 2014

The changing Arctic Ocean
Arrigo KR. 2013.
Total views: 19,168 since original publication on Dec 04, 2013

Solar energy capture and transformation in the sea
Karl DM. 2014.
Total views: 18,706 since original publication on Jan 08, 2014

Special Features open for submissions and enquiries

Impacts of natural versus anthropogenic oil inputs on the Gulf of Mexico Ecosystem

Advances in ocean acidification research

The sea surface microlayer

Oceans and human health in a changing environment

Marginal ice zone processes in the summertime Arctic

Climate change impacts: Fish, fisheries and fisheries management

Biogeochemical Exchange Processes at Sea-Ice Interfaces (BEPSII)


Associate Editor Samuel Oltmans tells us about his experiences in the Atmospheric Science field

Sam_Oltmans_Tromso_picture

“The atmosphere is the place where many of us probably see most dramatically a number of the impacts of human activity in, for example, climate change and degraded air quality.”

 Please tell us a little bit about your position and your areas of research.

I currently have a research position with the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES), which is a joint enterprise between NOAA and the University of Colorado. Many of my colleagues while I worked at NOAA were affiliated with CIRES. Much of my current research is an extension of research I was associated with when I was at NOAA. Broadly, my research has focused on atmospheric composition and how changes in this composition have changed both due to human activity and natural atmospheric cycles. Long term measurements of atmospheric constituents, especially ozone, and the interpretation of those measurements have been the focus of my career. My largest contribution has probably been in the understanding of tropospheric ozone particularly, in the “background” atmosphere, with an emphasis on longer-term changes. Stratospheric ozone and water vapor measurements also were topics of significant interest. I began my career measuring stratospheric ozone before depletion of ozone was even considered as a possibility. I have had the opportunity to actively participate in the understanding of this human-caused environmental impact on the atmosphere and to see steps taken to overcome the unforeseen consequences of uncontrolled use of the atmosphere as a dumping ground. Currently my focus has been on the impacts of oil and gas extraction on air quality, again with a focus on ozone formation from ozone precursor emitted during exploration and extraction activity.

 

Your record of scientific achievements is very impressive, having published more than 200 peer-reviewed journal articles over more than 40 years.  Why did you decide to follow this invitation to become an Associate Editor for Elementa’s Atmospheric Science domain at this stage of your career?

An important factor was the encouragement of the Atmospheric Science domain Editor-in-Chief, Detlev Helmig. We have worked together on a number of research projects and I wanted to support him in his role as an Elementa editor. Also with open access publishing becoming an important avenue for sharing the results of scientific research, I wanted to be associated with a publication that was focused broadly on environmental change, but also one that captured individual areas of research so that researchers in the area of atmospheric science would see this as a place to go both to read and publish important new research results.

 

Why do you believe research surrounding human impacts on the atmosphere within the epoch of the Anthropocene to be of significance?

The atmosphere is the place where many of us probably see most dramatically a number of the impacts of human activity in, for example, climate change and degraded air quality. In a study I am currently working on in the Uintah Basin of Utah, ozone levels and methane concentrations have been measured that are not seen even in some of the most polluted urban areas. Understanding the causes and solutions to problems like these are of great societal importance.

 

Throughout your career you probably have seen a number of models and transitions in scientific publication.  How did this shape your feeling about open access publishing?

Both in terms of how manuscripts were prepared and the way they were published have changed dramatically. The change to open access publishing has been the most recent change and adapting to it like other changes requires a shift in the way I have become used to doing things. This will be right up there with the shift from a paper-based publication process to the current primarily digital process of both manuscript submission and publication. Adapting to the open access format is part of staying relevant and expanding opportunities for making ones research available to as wide an audience as possible.

 

You have been working as a US government, (i.e. publicly funded) researcher for most of your life.  Have you seen differences in how government, university, or private industry scientists pursue the publishing of their work?

Up to this point my perception has been that in the atmospheric science field there has not been as strong a push or requirement to publish in an open access format. There has been a much stronger emphasis and even requirement in the biological/medical related research areas toward open access. Because of the cost of journal subscriptions and the pressure this puts on research and academic institution libraries there will definitely be encouragement to use open access publishing. Government funded research publication will be more broadly pushed in this direction both to control costs and to keep from giving the perception that government funded research is enhancing the coffers of a for profit business.

 

Do you think it is important that Elementa is a nonprofit publication and how do you foresee that this publication model will affect your colleagues from these different sectors?

I think most researchers want to see their work have as broad an impact as possible. This has traditionally meant that for profit publishers like Nature have been venues that carry a particular status. Publications of professional societies like the American Geophysical Union or the American Meteorological Society where I have published are seen as less profit motivated. My hope is that as a nonprofit Elementa will have a particular place among open access journals that will achieve recognition since much of the proliferation of open access publication appears to be associated with for profit publishers.

 

Why do you think researchers should consider publishing in Elementa?

It is exciting to be part of a new enterprise and help shape its direction. A focus on providing strong credibility for the quality of the research that is published with respected editors and a commitment to quality peer-review will help build the reputation of Elementa. Also as I mentioned earlier, having both a broad environmental perspective and focused discipline domains is attractive for publication of papers with a range of audience interests.


New Images from NASA

719090main_china_tmo_cropped_800-600
Image Credit: NASA/Terra – MODIS

Air Quality Suffering in China

Residents of Beijing and many other cities in China were warned to stay inside in mid-January 2013 as the nation faced one of the worst periods of air quality in recent history.

The Chinese government ordered factories to scale back emissions, while hospitals saw spikes of more than 20 to 30 percent in patients complaining of respiratory issues, according to news reports.

Read the full report here.