New Titles on the Art Market—Available Now for Courses

The spectacle of the contemporary art market has assumed a prominent place in the collective consciousness, with the New York Times and other general interest publications regularly reporting on noteworthy auctions and acquisitions. Unsurprisingly, courses and programs focusing on this area of study are likewise expanding. These two new books are designed for classroom use, each providing unique tools and resources for instructor and student alike. Titia Hulst’s book is the first such sourcebook with a historical perspective, and John Zarobell has created an accessible primer that sheds light on the complex workings of the international art market in our global twenty first century.

A History of the Western Art Market: A Sourcebook of Writings on Artists, Dealers, and Markets By Titia Hulst

Read Chapter 1

Table of Contents

“This is an important anthology and one that will allow great flexibility and breadth in how it can be used in classrooms. It will also be a very useful introduction to the field for scholars who would like to understand the market as an aid to their own research.”—Pamela Fletcher, Professor of Art History, Bowdoin College

This is the first sourcebook to trace the emergence and evolution of art markets in the Western economy, framing them within the larger narrative of the ascendancy of capitalist markets. Selected writings from across academic disciplines present compelling evidence of art’s inherent commercial dimension and show how artists, dealers, and collectors have interacted over time. This volume’s unique historical perspective makes it appropriate for use in college courses and postgraduate and professional programs, as well as for professionals working in art-related environments such as museums, galleries, and auction houses.

  • this is the first textbook for students of art markets, designed to eliminate the need for instructors to cobble art market readings together from journal articles and other sources
  • the first book to employ an interdisciplinary perspective, with writings by art historians, artists, economists, philosophers, anthropologists, sociologists, lawyers, and others
  • incorporates both theoretical writings and case studies within each chapter

Titia Hulst is a modern and contemporary art historian. She holds a PhD from the Institute of Fine Arts and an MBA from New York University. In addition, she teaches art history at Purchase College in New York.

Request an Exam Copy of A History of the Western Art Market

 

Art and the Global Economy By John Zarobell

Read Chapter 1

Table of Contents

“The ideal book for my class and for any artist interested in understanding the complex relationship between the creative mind and the challenging materialistic context in which it exists.”—Enrique Chagoya, Artist and Professor, Department of Art and Art History, Stanford University

Art and the Global Economy analyzes major changes in the global art world that have emerged in the last twenty years. John Zarobell explores the economic and social transformations in the cultural sphere, the results of greater access to information about art, exhibitions, and markets around the world, as well as the increasing interpenetration of formerly distinct geographical domains. By considering a variety of locations—both long-standing art capitals and up-and-coming centers of the future—this book facilitates a deeper understanding of how globalization affects the domain of the visual arts in the twenty-first century.

  • provides a broader picture of arts institutions and exhibition mechanisms, as well as the market, in order to provide a more complete and integrated image of how the art world has transformed in the past generation
  • complementing the primary narrative are engaging profiles of emerging international art centers by guest authors who have worked/participated in the markets in question
  • color insert features compelling data visualizations presenting key data about exhibitions, art fairs, and auctions share worldwide

John Zarobell is Assistant Professor of International Studies at the University of San Francisco. He has held curatorial positions at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art and the Philadelphia Museum of Art. A regular contributor to the web-based journal Art Practical, he has written for numerous exhibition catalogues and has curated exhibitions of modern and contemporary art. He is the author of Empire of Landscape: Space and Ideology in French Colonial Algeria.

Request an Exam Copy of Art and the Global Economy


Save 30% with UC Press during the Modernist Studies Association Conference

The 2017 Modernist Studies Association Conference convenes August 10 – 13 in Amsterdam.

Check out our landing page featuring UC Press across various disciplines, including Art, Music, Visual Culture, and Cinema & Media Studies. Save 30% online with discount code 17W6815, or request an exam copy for consideration to use in your upcoming classes. The discount code expires September 30, 2017.


The Polaroid Project: Instantly fun. Forever iconic.

Recently named a notable opening by the New York Times, The Polaroid Project: At the Intersection of Art and Technology is on view at the Amon Carter Museum of American Art starting on June 3.

The richly designed catalogue provides a unique perspective on the Polaroid phenomenon—a technology, an art form, a convergence of both—and its enduring cultural legacy.

 

Through the corporation’s own artist support program, which provided many with materials, Polaroid helped shape the artistic landscape of the late twentieth century. The Polaroid Project showcases not only the myriad and often idiosyncratic approaches taken by such photographers as Dennis Hopper, Robert Mapplethorpe, Ellen Carey, Andrea Wolff, Ansel Adams, Chuck Close, and many more, but also presents a fascinating selection of the technical objects and artifacts that speak to the sheer ingenuity that lay behind the art.

 

The impressive exhibition displays a variety of image sizes and formats produced over decades of time, and has been organized by the Foundation for the Exhibition of Photography, Minneapolis/New York/Paris/Lausanne, in collaboration with the MIT Museum, Cambridge, Mass., and the WestLicht Museum for Photography, Vienna. If you are lucky enough to be in the Fort Worth area, don’t miss Ellen Carey‘s artist talk on June 10.

Enter to win a copy of the catalogue via our Goodreads giveaway (through July 1).


Ephemeral Histories

This guest post is published in conjunction with the meeting of the Latin American Studies Association taking place April 29-May 1 in Lima, Peru. #LASA17

by Camilo Trumper, author of Ephemeral Histories: Public Art, Politics, and the Struggle for the Streets in Chile

Chile’s Museum of Memory and Human Rights marked 2017’s World Book Day by circulating a photograph of uniformed cadets burning books and magazines on city streets in 1973, a jarring image mobilized in hopes that “Never Again” would Chileans censor the written word as they had after the bloody coup that toppled Salvador Allende’s democratically elected socialist government. Photographer Kena Lorenzini’s collection of images, published as Marcas Crónicas: Rayados y panfletos de los 80, reveals a different practice of writing and erasure in Santiago, Chile’s capital city. Hers are austere records of the breathtaking range of rayados scrawled in public and semi-public spaces in the almost two decades of military rule: complicated debates taking place on, and taking advantage of the fleeting privacy afforded by, the locked doors of bathroom stalls; party slogans furtively etched on the back of bus seats; and banners unfurled by students, artists and activists to protest the dictatorship’s terror. These photographs map a hidden landscape of political writing hiding in plain sight.

The political activists who created this political landscape drew on a long history of urban contest that reached its apex under Allende. My book, Ephemeral Histories: Public Art, Politics, and the Struggle for the Street in Chile, studies how women and workers, students and artists claimed public spaces as their own, turning to murals, posters, and graffiti as a means of shaping city streets, squares and walls into vibrant arenas of political exchange in democracy. Creative forms of public art and writing were quickly targeted by the nascent military regime, which looked to “cleanse” the landscape of any trace of activism, and forced residents to whitewash walls at gunpoint, to burn and bury posters alongside books and magazines. But santiaguinos responded creatively to censure. Lorenzini’s most compelling images focus on the ordinary inscriptions that citizens carved onto city walls as everyday acts of urban transgression that sustained resistance to military rule. In one particularly poignant series, her lens follows a web of text as it snakes along city walls, arching across buildings and around corners. Erasure leads only to further expression. Just as quickly as phrases condemning dictatorship are scratched out, new, vibrant responses appear, crying out over the thin cover of whitewash. Her photographs suggests that santiaguinos turned again to clandestine public writing in dictatorship, perfecting techniques originally learned in democracy to re-build spaces of vibrant political debate. These ephemeral acts of public writing help build a public sphere of political debate rooted in public space, and an ephemeral practice of political citizenship played out in the very streets and walls quieted by state violence and attempted censorship.

This year’s LASA congress theme, “Dialogues of Knowledge,” suggests that we must open ourselves to consider creative forms of knowledge generated at the boundaries between disciplines, experiences, and spaces. Lorenzini’s photographs offer an excellent example of this form of critical interdisciplinary thinking. They reveal the strategies and tactics of urban conflict, and public writing in particular, to be creative responses to dictatorial rule, an “other” form of knowledge Chilean citizens living under dictatorship developed to navigate public and private spaces, sustain political dialogue, and limit the authority and legitimacy of military authority. In so doing, they transformed the city it into a vital political arena and themselves into active political citizens in the face of state-sponsored violence and terror.


Camilo D. Trumper is an Assistant Professor of American Studies and Latin American History at the University at Buffalo, SUNY.


Celebrating Slow Art Day

While slow movements have garnered attention and interest over the years, Slow Art Day is an annual event that may not be on every one’s radars, but is in fact very easy to embrace and celebrate.

The Slow Art Day website describes their mission in simple terms: “help more people discover for themselves the joy of looking at and loving art.” They lay out three clear steps of action for interested participants, that truly essentially come down to looking at art, and slowing yourself down in the process.

Arden Reed, author of the forthcoming Slow Art: The Experience of Looking, Sacred Images to James Turrell, begins his book with a DeLillo quote that also prescribes a way of looking, experiencing, and connecting.

“The less there was to see, the harder he looked, the more he saw. This was the point. To see what’s here, finally to look and to know you’re looking, to feel time passing, to be alive to what is happening in the smallest registers of motion.”

—Don DeLillo, Point Omega

 

Slow Art explores broader questions about spectatorship, questions about how we look at art now. In a recent blog post Arden Reed “advocates an aesthetics of slowness.” Take a cue from his book—and from Slow Art Day—and visit your local museum tomorrow to see what draws you in, makes you pause, enthralls.

If you’re inspired to share your experiences, post a photo or describe a feeling and tag us: @educatedarts #SlowArtDay.


Slowing Down for Art

This post is part of a blog series celebrating the College Art Association annual conference taking place in New York City from February 15–18. Please visit us at Booth 605 if you are attending, and otherwise stay tuned for more content related to our new and forthcoming Art books.


by Arden Reed, author of Slow Art: The Experience of Looking, Sacred Images to James Turrell

Surprise: more Americans visit art museums every year than attend professional sporting events and amusement parks combined. Way more, in fact. But many visitors feel clueless about how to navigate: where to head first? what to look at in, say, Gallery Nine? how to connect with that thing? Such befuddlement needn’t be the case. Everybody, I believe, is not only entitled but already equipped to have meaningful museum encounters. Whether or not visitors have any particular talent, art education, or technical vocabulary, they have all they need to find pleasure in looking—namely their life experience and their eyes. But everything depends on how we use those eyes. Generally speaking, art worth its salt only reveals itself gradually, as we dwell with it. If you speed past most works, you simply cannot know what you’re missing. But slow down and magic happens. Paintings, for instance, start to behave like moving pictures—that’s how much they can change under your gaze.

Accustomed to instant gratification and addicted to speed, how can we stretch out the 6–10 seconds that, on average, people spend looking at any given artwork? Slow Art tries to think through that challenge and develops strategies to enhance our artful encounters. A wide range of contemporary genres—including photography, film, video, digital art, painting, sculpture, fiction, installation and performance art, even tableaux vivants (“living pictures”)—shapes this new aesthetic field. But rather than a collection of aesthetic objects, as you might suppose, “slow art” names the dynamic relationship that transpires between objects and observers. Slow Art is also about changing our practices of looking. Together beholder and beheld create the experience.

9780520285507

More than describe, I advocate an aesthetics of slowness: decelerating benefits works we contemplate but us as well. Over roughly the past 200 years the pace of everyday life has quickened exponentially, leading people to seek time-outs—the kind of quiet spaces that religion used to offer. But even as our need for breathers has intensified, our opportunities have diminished. The option of worship—think of contemplating icons—shrinks in secular societies. The result: speeding along the Autobahn of modernity we seek off-ramps—only to find the old rest stops closed. Might experiencing art reclaim the social spaces evacuated by religious gazing? Can slow art be a modern, secular displacement of old sacred practices? For museumgoers seasoned or raw, Slow Art models ways to enhance our acts of looking.


arden-reed-portrait

Arden Reed is Arthur and Fanny Dole Professor of English at Pomona College. He writes on the visual arts and literature, and his publications include Manet, Flaubert, and the Emergence of Modernism and Romantic Weather: The Climates of Coleridge and Baudelaire.


The Uses of Photography exhibition opens this weekend at the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego

 

Dawsey cover
The Uses of Photography: Art, Politics, and the Reinvention of a Medium (September 2016)

we had this dream     of truth     the truth of things

maybe in a photograph.

—David Antin

Published in conjunction with an exhibition opening this evening at the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego, The Uses of Photography examines a network of artists whose experiments with photography during the turbulent, transitional period between the late 1960s and early 1980s opened the medium to a profusion of new strategies and subjects. Working within the framework of Conceptual art, artists such as Eleanor Antin, Allan Kaprow, Fred Lonidier, Martha Rosler, Allan Sekula, and Carrie Mae Weems introduced urgent social issues and themes of everyday life into the seemingly neutral territory of photography, producing works that took on hybrid forms, from books and postcards to video and text-and-image installations.

And, courtesy of our partners at MCASD here’s a behind-the-scenes view of preparators, Nick and Jeremy, installing Fred Lonidier’s GAF Snapshirts.

Exhibition install
Installation of Fred Lonidier (1976), Courtesy of the artist; Michael Benevento, Los Angeles; Essex Street, New York; and Silberkuppe, Berlin.

The exhibition runs through January 2nd, and event programming includes film screenings, panel discussions with the artists, curator talks and more.

To get your own copy of the catalogue, visit the museum, or purchase online at IndieBoundAmazonBarnes & Noble, or UC Press (to save 30% on ucpress.edu, enter discount code16M4197 at checkout).


A Comic-Con Reading List

Whether you’ll be joining the feverish thousands in person or not, in honor of Day 1 of Comic-Con 2016, we’ve rounded up some suggested reading for our pop culture fans, comic book lovers, and monster and other creature geeks.

Funnybooks: The Improbable Glories of the Best American Comic Books

Attendees will have two chances to hear author Michael Barrier speak this year. Join a discussion on ‘Walt Kelly and POGO’ from 12:30–1:30 PM on Friday or go to the ‘Spotlight on Michael Barrier’ on Friday evening where he will talk about the challenges and rewards of pursuing an interest in comic books that bypasses superheroes in favor of artists like Carl Barks, Walt Kelly, and John Stanley. Randy Duncan (author of The Power of Comics: History, Form and Culture) will moderate this Q&A session, which will followed by an autograph session from 5:30–6:30 PM in the Sails Pavilion.

Hellboy’s World: Comics and Monsters on the Margins

Despite Mike Mingola’s recent release of the final issue of Hellboy, you can still immerse yourself in the aesthetic world and “adventure of reading” with Scott Bukatman‘s delightfully beautiful volume. With positive reviews from Henry Jenkins on ‘Confessions of an Aca-Fan‘, The Comics Journal, and Junot Díaz, you don’t have to just take our word for how great this book is.

Star Trek and American Television

With a foreword by Sir Patrick Stewart, and taking their cue from the words of the program’s first captain, William Shatner, in an interview with the authors: “It’s a television show.”, this book returns to the heart of one of the most successful transmedia franchises of all time: the initially unsuccessful 1960s television production, Star Trek: The Original Series.

Dangerous Games: What the Moral Panic over Role-Playing Games Says about Play, Religion, and Imagined Worlds

Listen to author Joseph Laycock talk about ‘The Satanic Panic & Role Playing Games’ on an episode of MonsterTalk, then jump into his book which makes “a much-needed contribution to the understanding of the human need and capacity for creating and inhabiting multiple realities.”

Pixar and the Aesthetic Imagination: Animation, Storytelling, and Digital Culture

Eric Herhuth draws upon film theory, animation theory, and philosophy to examine modes of animation storytelling that address aesthetic experience within contexts of technological, environmental, and socio-cultural change. This forthcoming book considers Pixar’s artificial worlds and transformational stories as opportunities for thinking through aesthetics as a contested domain committed to newness and innovation, as well as criticism and pluralistic thought.

Krazy!: The Delirious World of Anime + Comics + Video Games + Art

“What’s interesting about Krazy! is that it explores these art forms and presents them in a way in that forces the reader to never look at anime, manga, or video games in the same way again. . . . With bold, beautiful full-colored pictures. . . . Embrace the kraziness.”—Pop Matters


Stop by the on-site Mysterious Galaxy Bookstore at Comic-Con, or save 30% on all UC Press Animation titles with discount code 16M4197 (enter code at checkout).


Puja and Piety exhibition now at Santa Barbara Museum of Art

pal_april2016

 

 

 

 

 

While we could not be there for the recent opening of the Puja and Piety exhibition at the Santa Barbara Museum of Art, we proudly co-published the impressive catalogue and have been savoring each piece among its richly illustrated pages.

Puja and Piety celebrates the complexity of South Asian representation and iconography by examining the relationship between aesthetic expression and the devotional practice, or puja, in the three native religions of the Indian subcontinent. Drawn from SBMA’s collection and augmented by loans, the exhibition presents some 160 objects created over the past two millennia for temples, home worship, festivals, and roadside shrines.

The below gallery provides a small visual sampling of the varied Buddhist, Hindu, and Jain works of art.

 

The exhibition runs April 17–July 31, 2016 at the Santa Barbara Museum of Art.


A Sea of Glass and the Blaschkas’ Fragile Legacy

What caught Drew Harvell’s eye first was a glass octopus. Inspired by the incredible glass marine sculptures of Leopold and Rudolf Blaschka, she soon set off to search for their living counterparts. In her new book A Sea of Glass, she tells the story of this journey of a lifetime while exploring unusual biology of these ancient animals and showing us that our ocean ecosystems—like the Blaschkas’ works of art—are as fragile as glass.

In honor of Earth Day, check out a slideshow of incredible Blaschka creations below, and learn more about Drew’s book here.

Additionally, click here to save 30% on new and bestselling science titles.

  • Common Octopus (Photo: Gary Hodges)
  • Sea Pansy (Photo: Gary Hodges)
  • From Left to Right: Siphonophores: Apolemia uvaria (Photo: Kent Loeffler) and Rosacea cymbiformis (Photo:Gray Hodges)
  • From Left to Right: mauve stinger (Photo: Drew Harvell), mauve stinger glass (Photo: Corning Museum of Glass), stinger watercolor (Photo: Corning Museum of Glass)
  • tentacle tubeworm (Photo: C. Smith)
  • From Left to Right: Doto Glass (Photo: C. Smith), Doto live (Photo: Reyn Yoshioka)
  • seadragon glass (Photo: Guido Mocafico), sea dragon watercolor (Photo: Corning Museum)
  • histioteuthis before (Photo: E. Brill), histioteuthis after (Photo: K. Loeffler)
  • common seastar in glass (Photo: Guido Mocafico)