Praying and Preying

by Aparecida Vilaça, author of Praying and Preying: Christianity in Indigenous Amazonia

This guest post is published in conjunction with the American Anthropological Association conference in Minneapolis. Check back regularly for new posts through the end of the conference on November 20th.

UC Press is proud to be part of the AAUP’s fifth annual University Press Week. Check out our blog and social media channels through Nov. 19th (plus follow hashtags #ReadUp #UPWeek), and learn how we, along with 40 of our scholarly press colleagues, work diligently to publish vital works benefitting educational, specialized research, and general interest communities.

9780520289147In 1986, when I arrived for the first time, the Negro river village, in the Brazilian state of Rondônia, situated between 6 and 20 hours by boat from the city of Guajará-Mirim (depending on outboard motor size and river level), was inhabited by 350 agriculturists, hunters and gatherers with little access to manufactured goods. Although a health worker, a teacher, an agent of the National Indian Foundation and a missionary couple from the New Tribes Mission were also living among them, they seemed to be living a fairly, we could say, traditional life. They told me that they had been Christians throughout the 1970s, but had ‘abandoned God’ at the start of the 1980s. At the time four shamans were active there, curing people attacked by animal spirits and travelling to the subaquatic world where the dead lived.

This situation was transformed at the turn of the century when a revival occurred, accompanied by a new wave of conversions. According to some, the principal reason for the collective conversion was the fear that the world would end because of the USA’s response to the September 11th attacks, an event the Wari’ had been able to watch on the community television. When I arrived in January 2002, I was surprised by the changes. A house had been transformed into a church where various services were held each week. People came up to ask me whether the war had already reached Rio de Janeiro, my home town, and were eager for international news of the conflict. They said that if the end of the world caught them unprepared, still non-Christians, they would go directly to hell where they would spend eternity roasting like game animals.

Continue reading “Praying and Preying”


On Shopping Malls and the Politics of Access

by Arlene Davila, author of El Mall: The Spatial and Class Politics of Shopping Malls in Latin America

This guest post is published in conjunction with the American Anthropological Association conference in Minneapolis. Check back regularly for new posts through the end of the conference on November 20th.

UC Press is proud to be part of the AAUP’s fifth annual University Press Week. Check out our blog and social media channels through Nov. 19th (plus follow hashtags #ReadUp #UPWeek), and learn how we, along with 40 of our scholarly press colleagues, work diligently to publish vital works benefitting educational, specialized research, and general interest communities.

9780520286856Since the publication of El Mall, I have been asked what turned me to examining shopping malls and shopping cultures in Latin America, a question that is always loaded with significance.  It often assumes that shopping and shopping malls are irrelevant subjects of study for anthropologists and scholars, or that consumer culture is a vain or superfluous topic, or even that Latin Americans are exempt from the dreams and pulls of global consumer culture. I end these conversations thinking that all the talk around globalization, neoliberalism, mediated lives and materiality notwithstanding anthropologists and interdisciplinary scholars have not fully come to terms with the powerful pull of consumption and consumer cultures throughout the world and with the need to fully engage these topics in our research.

In the twenty or so years that I’ve been researching and writing about consumer culture and the political economy of culture I’ve found that cultural studies on these subjects still focuses overwhelmingly on the United States and Europe, while anthropologist are still shy to take on subjects that would compromise the “authenticity” of their anthropological field sites or topics of research.  Why study shopping malls, or fashion, or commercial media when these cultural phenomena seem indistinguishable from our cozy experiences in our very own consumer landscapes?-goes the thinking.  The fact is that I myself was not immune to these concerns when I embarked on this study.  I wrote about shopping malls not because I had purposefully set out to do so, but because I found myself in the “belly of the beast” – sharing my previous work on Puerto Rican consumer culture in a trade organization meeting of the International Council of Shopping Centers in Medellin – invited by a former interviewee.  It was he who felt I needed to write about shopping mall cultures and who despite my warnings that whatever I wrote would be from a critical perspective –opened my eyes to the booming world of shopping malls developers, contractors, pundits and more.  Soon I learned that this impenetrable business that seemed to materialize all the workings of neoliberal capitalism and remained so intimidating in its scope and reach was ripe for analysis.

Those of use who strive to study up and expose the political economy of institutions, industries and how capitalism works know full well that access is not always easy to get.  Corporate culture is all about confidentiality agreements, closed door meetings, proprietary research, and inaccessibly priced meetings and conferences that keep many of us at bay from knocking at the doors of powerful stakeholders of capitalism.  But with access comes responsibility to follow up and crack up the worlds of industry and neoliberal capitalism with fine tuned ethnographic research.  The result is a book that shows the why and how shopping malls are one of the most powerful engines of social transformations in Latin America, shaping how cities are organized and even how local fashionistas define class and identities on their daily lives.  Most humbly, the result is a reminder of the same lesson I learned when writing Latinos Inc. years earlier:  That capitalism is made up of relationships and that studying up is more necessary than ever in these age of rapid neoliberalization.  Once again, the “mundane” yet shining space of consumer culture surpassed my own expectations of what questions could be asked, and what issues were most relevant within this industry, from urban design to the topic of informal economies and even fast fashion.  In all, I’m very glad I heard the call the mall, and just delved in!

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Arlene Dávila is Professor of Anthropology and Social and Cultural Analysis at New York University. She is the author of numerous books, including Barrio Dreams and Latinos Inc..


Plastic Reason

by Tobias Rees, author of Plastic Reason: An Anthropology of Brain Science in Embryogenetic Terms

This guest post is published in conjunction with the American Anthropological Association conference in Minneapolis. Check back regularly for new posts through the end of the conference on November 20th.

UC Press is proud to be part of the AAUP’s fifth annual University Press Week. Check out our blog and social media channels through Nov. 19th (plus follow hashtags #ReadUp #UPWeek), and learn how we, along with 40 of our scholarly press colleagues, work diligently to publish vital works benefitting educational, specialized research, and general interest communities.

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I imagine writing a reply to a book review that has never been written. I imagine the review to be kind and generous. Funny perhaps. It summarizes Plastic Reason elegantly and offers brief summaries of each chapter. And yet, despite its elegance, the review gets everything wrong about my book –– like all book reviews, always.

Or not wrong, no, that isn’t the right word. It gets nothing wrong. It is just that, well, it misses everything I cared about while writing my text.

True, Plastic Reason is about the discovery that some embryogenetic growth processes –– from the sprouting of axons to the birth of new neurons –– occur in the adult brain and thereby render it plastic. I trace, on many pages, how plasticity research emerged and try to show how, in which precise ways –– conceptually, experimentally, ethically –– it amounts to a radical rupture from the neurochemical conception of the brain that has dominated since World War II.

But all of this tracing is just pretext. It is not at all, if you ask me, what the book is about. And that someone could seriously suggest that Plastic Reason is reducible to a mere recounting of the discovery of cerebral plasticity leaves me not only disappointed; it leaves me heartbroken.

But what, then, is Plastic Reason about?

To begin with, it is not about science. Nor about the brain. I am not so much interested in science. Nor in the brain. What intrigued me, instead, was poetry. It is not that I think I am a poet. What I mean instead is the effort, akin to poetry, of capturing something of the intense turmoil provoked by the unanticipated finding of plasticity –– the falling apart of certainty, the loss of truth, the gain of unstable possibilities.

More specifically, I found myself intrigued by the idea that at the center of scientific practice is an irreducible uncertainty.

Imagine that every effort to come to terms with experiments –– the photos, the gels, the the blots, the graphs, the many hours of discussions at the bench –– were all contingent on unarticulated conceptual presuppositions. On so many of them that they could never be all discovered and cleared. The consequence would be an irreducible instability.

I fell in love with just this instability. And I was thrilled –– frenzy –– when I recognized that I shared this love with the men and women who introduced me to the art of experimentation. I learned that labs are not about the production of truth. Or maybe they are but this is not what matters to the experimenter, at least not those I got to know. No, what matters in experimentation is the cultivation of uncertainty. What matters is the art of making uncertainty productive –– of letting it derail yet another set up, of opening yet another, unforeseen horizon.

Sure, I documented how plasticity disrupted the conception of the brain as a fixed, neurochemical machine. But what interested me in this documentation of a rupture was the possibility of showing that it has to be understood as the result of poetry: of the the art of imaging that things could be otherwise as we had thought, of the effort of capturing snapshots of the growth of form, of rendering the brain visible as a form in ceaseless movement.

What intrigued me as well was that the work on the brain, since roughly 1800, was work on the human. Of course, what the brain has changed many times over since Franz Joseph Gall first established the brain as organ of the human. But this is exactly why I got fascinated: Built-into the correlation between brain and human is the exact same instability (or is it a different one?) as in experimentation.

Could I render visible the daily work on plasticity as experimental philosophy –– or poetry –– of the human? As ethical work of a self on a self? In conversation with friends (and mice and fish)? Conducted as an end in itself?

How could a reader not see that even though I work on the terrain of STS, I am not an STS scholar? How could she miss that my ambition has been to render visible, with the tools of the poetic and philosophically inclined fieldworker, the artistic and anthropological of the contemporary?

But I am running out of words. I only had 500 (and wrote 726).

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unnamedTobias Rees is Associate Professor of Anthropology with a dual appointment in the Department of Social Studies of Medicine at McGill University.


Scale: Discourse and Dimensions of Social Life

by E. Summerson Carr and Michael Lempert, co-editors of Scale: Discourse and Dimensions of Social Life

This guest post is published in conjunction with the American Anthropological Association conference in Minneapolis. Check back regularly for new posts through the end of the conference on November 20th.

UC Press is proud to be part of the AAUP’s fifth annual University Press Week. Check out our blog and social media channels through Nov. 19th (plus follow hashtags #ReadUp #UPWeek), and learn how we, along with 40 of our scholarly press colleagues, work diligently to publish vital works benefitting educational, specialized research, and general interest communities.

A free ebook version of this title is available through Luminos, University of California Press’s Open Access publishing program for monographs. Visit www.luminosoa.org to learn more.

9780520291799When Melville’s narrator, Ishmael, encounters the skeletal remains of a beached whale, he begins to make what he characterizes as “a simple, plain statement” that relays the creature’s enormity. Not even two sentences into his description, Ishmael finds that even a whale must be made big. To do so, Ishmael rattles off scalar descriptors. He starts with various quantifications of the whale, detailing its estimated length, height, and circumference, as well as its mass, both in terms of its fleshy past as well as its skeletal present.

Ishmael’s description also betrays that scaling can never be accomplished through quantification alone. He employs an array of scalar metaphors: the whale is like a Gothic cathedral, it’s as big as a village, one thousand inhabitants could fit within its frame, the whale is the Leviathan. It is only through this intricate interscalar description that Ishmael can be sure—and perhaps not even then that landsmen can properly see the awesome stuff of the seafarer’s world.

Continue reading “Scale: Discourse and Dimensions of Social Life”


The Fifth Beginning

by Robert W. Kelly, author of The Fifth Beginning: What Six Million Years of Human History Can Tell Us about Our Future

This guest post is published in conjunction with the American Anthropological Association conference in Minneapolis. Check back regularly for new posts through the end of the conference on November 20th.

UC Press is proud to be part of the AAUP’s fifth annual University Press Week. Check out our blog and social media channels through Nov. 19th (plus follow hashtags #ReadUp #UPWeek), and learn how we, along with 40 of our scholarly press colleagues, work diligently to publish vital works benefitting educational, specialized research, and general interest communities.

9780520293120Ask an archaeologist why he or she does archaeology and you might hear “we study the past to understand the future.” In The Fifth Beginning I take that charge seriously: What can six million years of human prehistory tell us about our future?

Archaeology’s ability to tell us about the future might seem limited. But with some much time at its disposal, archaeology can see the biggest of the big pictures. As I tell students, we often can’t see the trees, but we see the forest with great clarity. Using this strength, I argue that humanity has passed through four transitions, or beginnings, when human life changed, forever. Archaeologists recognize these transitions by virtue of their significant change in humanity’s signature on earth.

The first four beginnings are familiar to archaeologists. The first is the beginning of technology, marked by the appearance of stone tools some 3.3 million years ago.

The second is the beginning of the capacity for culture, for symbols, and for life in a symbolically-constructed world. Starting between 200,000 and 70,000 years ago, this beginning was marked by art, complex tools, burials and, most likely, religion.

The third beginning was agriculture, which occurred in various places after 12,000 years ago. This was marked by permanent villages, and the spread of domesticated plants and animals.

The fourth beginning entailed the origin of states, organizations with centralized power and authority. This was marked by “shock and awe” public architecture, art, science and clever technologies, e.g., to enhance food production and to transport of goods, people, and information. It’s also the time of standing armies, warfare, poverty, racism, and sexism. It’s the time we live in now.

By taking an archaeological perspective on recent history, I show that an archaeologist 100,000 years from now would recognize another beginning, one marked by the massive impact of humanity on earth, by the connecting of literally every corner of the globe, by widespread similarity in material culture, and by rapid change in material culture.

These beginnings were and are emergent phenomena. Hunter-gatherers didn’t intend to become farmers; they became farmers while trying to be the best hunter-gatherer they could be. The same is true today. In trying to be the best industrialized, well-armed, capitalist nation-state, we will become something completely different.

What might the fifth beginning entail? Using prehistory as a training ground, I detect three processes at work today: the escalating cost of war, the global reach of capitalism, and the globalization of culture. These processes point to a future where war is no longer a viable way to solve problems, where capitalism will reach a logical endpoint, and where the nation-state will no longer be a sacred organization. It’s the end of life as we know it. But it’s not Armageddon. It’s the beginning of global self-governance marked by new forms of cooperation. And despite how bleak things may appear today, the fifth beginning could be humanity’s finest hour.

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Bob_ at 11_000 feet in Absarokas_ 2014

Robert L. Kelly is Professor of Anthropology at the University of Wyoming. He is a past president of the Society for American Archaeology, current editor of American Antiquity, author of The Lifeways of Hunter-Gatherers, and coauthor of two popular textbooks, Archaeology and Archaeology: Down to Earth. He has conducted archaeological research throughout the western United States for more than forty years.


Words Matter

by Elizabeth Keating and Sirkka Jarvenpaa, co-authors of Words Matter: Communicating Effectively in the New Global Office

This guest post is published in conjunction with the American Anthropological Association conference in Minneapolis. Check back regularly for new posts through the end of the conference on November 20th.

UC Press is proud to be part of the AAUP’s fifth annual University Press Week. Check out our blog and social media channels through Nov. 19th (plus follow hashtags #ReadUp #UPWeek), and learn how we, along with 40 of our scholarly press colleagues, work diligently to publish vital works benefitting educational, specialized research, and general interest communities.

Words Matter Keating JarvenpaaWe started writing Words Matter with the idea of sharing our findings with the engineers we studied, who so generously allowed us into their worlds. As we got more into the project we realized that the book could be useful to other professionals working in similar environments–global office settings where most interactions are mediated through technology, and to students about to go into the work world.

Words Matter takes the reader into the world of virtual teamwork on a global scale. We look at engineers collaborating from four world areas, Romania, India, Brazil and the US–places and people with quite different histories and cultural environments. Our aim is show readers what we observed when we traveled to study the engineers in four continents—that the engineers were skillfully managing multiple challenges of virtual designing, but that they were often frustrated by, to them, inexplicable breakdowns in communication, which also led to breakdowns in trust. We noticed as we talked to them and analyzed their interactions that the “model” of communication—how communication works and how to get it back on track after breakdowns—they were operating with was too narrow for the demands of technologically-mediated environments, where comments cross the globe in seconds and there are no face-to-face interactions. The engineers’ communication model worked perfectly well in the home office, but in the global office setting, they found, as one engineer said, “Language can betray you.” Their words had been misunderstood in serious ways, surprising them and resulting in project delays and damaged relationships. They realized that culture played a much bigger part in their interactions than they anticipated. When we first met the engineers, they told us they needed to know more about culture. In engineering school their demanding curriculums had not left time for courses in anthropology or communication.

Many people were surprised that we chose to study engineers’ communication, because of stereotypes about engineers. In fact, shortly after we began fieldwork, one of the engineers told us the following joke: “How do you tell an engineer with social skills?” We didn’t know. He said, “He looks at your shoes instead of his shoes.” But contrary to stereotypes about lack of social skills, we found the engineers to be surprisingly nostalgic for face-to-face interaction. They longed for opportunities for informal interactions with their global colleagues, and missed the casual “watercooler” and “hallway meetings” that are an important part of any professional work space. In technologically-mediated space, there are few opportunities to observe and learn about cultural differences in behavior.

In our book, we draw from many other researchers’ work, for example, in stressing how language is a tool for action, and how the same action can be expressed differently by different groups, meaning actions can be misinterpreted outside the group. We discuss how cultural differences in notions of moral personhood affect communication practices and interpretation.

It’s not typical for a linguistic anthropologist and a business expert to write a book together. We learned a great deal about not only engineering in global office settings, but how to do cross-disciplinary collaboration in research, writing, and in disseminating the results of our research.

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Elizabeth Keating standing copyElizabeth Keating is a professor at the University of Texas, Austin, and an award-winning scholar in the field of linguistic anthropology. She has researched communication and design practice among engineers, mathematicians, doctors, and programmers and has also studied the impact of new communication technology on deaf families and their interactions with sign language.

 

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Sirkka L. Jarvenpaa is an award-winning scholar and professor in business administration at the University of Texas, Austin, where she also directs the Center for Business, Technology, and Law. She studies and writes about virtual organizations and teams as well as global electronic commerce.

 


Award Winning UC Press Authors at the American Anthropological Association

UC Press is proud to be part of the AAUP’s fifth annual University Press Week. Check out our blog and social media channels through Nov. 19th (plus follow hashtags #ReadUp #UPWeek), and learn how we, along with 40 of our scholarly press colleagues, work diligently to publish vital works benefitting educational, specialized research, and general interest communities.

As the 2016 American Anthropological Association meeting begins, we’re pleased to congratulate four of our authors for the following illustrious award wins! These will be given in person at the annual meeting this week.

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Jason DeLeon, author of The Land of Open Graves: Living and Dying on the Migrant Trail is the recipient of the 2016 Margaret Mead Award. Here is what committee members had to say about his book:

This is an incredibly innovative book.  It combines data and analysis from three sub-fields—archaeology, biological anthropology, cultural anthropology.  There is also innovative ethnography.  The theory is new—starting with INS change of policy in order to use the environment as a deterrent and going on to the notion of the hybrid collective. It covers a whole new range of insights in the border between the US and Mexico and undocumented immigrants—a very important issue at this time.

The book includes a fictionalized account of the migrant trail, through which we are introduced to the “everyday terror of the desert”; extended transcripts of conversations with De León’s primary informants and friends; De León’s interspersed scholarship across anthropological fields that contextualizes narratives and conversations; vivid ethnography; the stark photographs by Mike Wells and the author; and the strong discussions on ethics (ethnographic and political), structural violence, inequality and racism. The book is gripping to read, and devastating and haunting.

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Seth Holmes, author of Fresh Fruit, Broken Bodies: Migrant Farmworkers in the United States, is the winner of the 2016 Robert B. Textor and Family Prize for Excellence in Anticipatory Anthropology. Seth’s work was described as “a trenchant ethnography that offers new possibilities for an engaged, empathic anthropology.”

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Angela Steusse, author of Scratching Out a Living: Latinos, Race, and Work in the Deep South, is the winner of the 2016 Society for the Anthropology of Work Book Prize. 

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Augustin Fuentes, author of Race, Monogamy, and Other Lies They Told You: Busting Myths about Human Nature, is the winner of the 2016 W. W. Howells Book Award in Biological Anthropology. 

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Roberto Gonzales, Social Work faculty working with undocumented young adults,

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Roberto G. Gonzales, author of Lives in Limbo: Undocumented and Coming of Age in America, is the winner of the 2016 Latina and Latino Anthropologists Book Award.

Many congratulations, once again, to our authors: we’re proud to have published with them!


Our Most Troubling Madness

by Tanya Luhrmann and Jocelyn Marrow, co-authors of Our Most Troubling Madness: Case Studies in Schizophrenia across Cultures

This guest post is published in conjunction with the American Anthropological Association conference in Minneapolis. Check back regularly for new posts through the end of the conference on November 20th.

UC Press is proud to be part of the AAUP’s fifth annual University Press Week. Check out our blog and social media channels through Nov. 19th (plus follow hashtags #ReadUp #UPWeek), and learn how we, along with 40 of our scholarly press colleagues, work diligently to publish vital works benefitting educational, specialized research, and general interest communities.

9780520291096Anisha, Veena, Priyanka, Madhu, Sita, and Sunita are Indian women diagnosed with schizophrenia. In Our Most Troubling Madness: Case Studies in Schizophrenia across Cultures, we show that despite their struggles, they succeed in fulfilling valued social roles in their families and communities in urban and rural locations across North and South India. They are proud of being responsible members of their social world. To be sure, some are less successful than others. But all remain optimistic that they might reach their life goals at some point in the future. Most of them have family who tolerate their odd behave as long as they can cook and care for their parents or their children.

In contrast, the life histories of John, Violet, Zaney, and Meg are bleaker. While none of the Indian women in our case studies knew their diagnosis, all four of these citizens of highly developed economies with state-of-the-art mental health care feel defined and limited by the label. To them, “schizophrenia” is a judgment that they are defective persons with little hope for a normal life. This is true even though they had been exposed to mental health activism asserting exactly the opposite. The good life in the United States and the United Kingdom—employment, financial self-sufficiency, and care of children and spouse—was unrealized and seemed unrealizable. They felt defeated.

Case studies of these ten lives, plus others from Ghana, Romania, and Thailand, provide intimate accounts of the social and cultural contexts in which persons with psychotic disorders live. They give depth to earlier, replicated findings of the World Health Organization that the course and outcomes for schizophrenia are different across the world, with some of the best results coming from India.

With a commitment to engaged anthropology, Our Most Troubling Madness examines the lives of those with psychotic disorders to suggest how we might redeem U.S. mental health services that do harm while they do good. Most importantly, we argue that creating a society in which those with psychosis may flourish involves altering our approach to psychosis. Downplaying the importance of diagnosis, respecting the experience of psychosis, allowing individuals to engage with voices, and focusing on interpersonal behavior in social settings, are tasks we may undertake to make our own culture more benign for those with psychosis.

When sharing on social media, please be sure to use the #AAA2016 hashtag!


T. M. Luhrmann is Professor of Anthropology at Stanford University. She is the author of When God Talks BackOf Two Minds, and Persuasions of the Witch’s Craft.

Jocelyn Marrow is a cultural anthropologist and Senior Study Director at Westat in Rockville, Maryland.


Home to Roost: Activist Research in the Deep South

by Angela Stuesse, author of Scratching Out a Living: Latinos, Race, and Work in the Deep South

This guest post is published in conjunction with the American Anthropological Association conference in Minneapolis. Check back regularly for new posts through the end of the conference on November 20th.

UC Press is proud to be part of the AAUP’s fifth annual University Press Week. Check out our blog and social media channels through Nov. 19th (plus follow hashtags #ReadUp #UPWeek), and learn how we, along with 40 of our scholarly press colleagues, work diligently to publish vital works benefitting educational, specialized research, and general interest communities.

9780520287211Set in Mississippi, my new book, Scratching out a Living takes readers into the chicken processing plants and surrounding communities in the Deep South to explore how new Latinx migration is transforming the region. But I came upon this project—upon the South—quite accidentally.

I hadn’t worked there previously or been focused on food or workplace justice, though I had been interested immigrant communities’ political mobilization. More importantly, I was committed to collaborative research that could both help us better understand lived social problems andcontribute to addressing those conditions. Specifically, I was trained in activist research at a time when my mentors were beginning to build the case for politically engaged scholarship that was in conversation and explicit political alignment with those people most closely affected by—and actively organizing to change—the social problems under study.

The idea of an anthropology that could simultaneously shed light on relations of inequality and be used as a tool by marginalized communities seeking social justice led me into dialogue with a budding coalition of folks in rural Mississippi—immigrant and civil rights advocates, labor unions, faith leaders, employment justice attorneys, and poultry workersgrappling with questions of worker justice within the context of new Latinx immigration into the area’s chicken plants.

I began by spending a summer in Mississippi with them, asking how research might advance their work to help immigrant and U.S.-born poultry workers improve their wages, working conditions, and quality of life. I quickly realized that there were more obstacles than resources for organizing workers across the differences of race, language, and citizenship that divide them, and I spent the better part of the next six years there alongside a budding workers’ center, trying to understand, explain, and help poultry workers overcome those challenges to building their collective power.  The book essentially tells this story.

The story begins with the founding of the poultry industry amid vast relations of racial inequality. I trace the entrance of African Americans into the plants, their history of struggle, and the industry’s recruitment of Latinx immigrant workers to gain greater control over the labor force. I consider the racialized reception of these newcomers and examine they myriad ways in which their presence in the plants has complicated efforts to organize workers. The story concludes with an exploration of the workers’ center’s efforts to bring workers into dialogue across difference. In the postscript I reflect upon my experiment in activist research, and I’ve been excited to see people are using it to talk with students about the promises and challenges of politically engaged methodologies.

Folks who are interested can watch a two-minute video trailer and learn more about the book at AngelaStuesse.com. There they will also find a free teaching guide. In addition to questions meant to stimulate synthesis, analysis, and reflection, the guide also contains a list of resources—films, art, and interactive websites—and ideas for action. It is my hope that readers’ engagement with the ideas in this book will lead them to explore further the challenges of immigration, race relations, labor exploitation, and community change, and to take action on these issues to make their campus, their city, their country, and our world a better place.

At this year’s meeting of the American Anthropological Association, Angela Stuesse will participate, along with politically engaged anthropologists Christen A. Smith and David Vine, in Activism and Anthropology: A Book Reading and Dialogue About Race, Immigration and War. To be held at the Minneapolis Central Library, this session will explore the connections between these authors’ recent books in order toidentify and build connections between #BlackLivesMatter, Black liberation struggles in Brazil, labor organizing in the U.S. South, immigrant justice, and the anti-war movement.

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Stuesse (NS)Angela Stuesse is Assistant Professor of Anthropology at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. Learn more about Dr. Stuesse here: www.angelastuesse.com/bio/