Help Your Students Understand the Impact of the End of DACA

This post is part of our blog series Integrate Current Events Into Your Courses, which aims to provide lecture topics and corresponding course books that will help your students think critically about today’s conversations on social inequality.

Earlier this week, the Trump administration announced it would end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program (DACA) in six months if Congress cannot find a different and more permanent solution. The statements Attorney General Jeff Sessions has used to describe many DACA recipients have been said to be misleading. And clarification about how DACA came about, who is affected, and what will happen next has been shared widely (click on Twitter hashtags #DACA #DREAMer to see the volume of commentary that’s been generated since earlier this week).

What has been sorely missed are the personal stories—those of people who were brought here as children to escape persecution or other hardships, have lived here in the United States peacefully, and are now poised to productively contribute to society. One such story is that of Jesus Contreras, a Houston-area paramedic who has been helping his community in the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey. And others, such as the DACA recipient who participated in a sit-down interview at Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg’s home, notes that, “[a]ll we’re asking for is a chance . . . I urge members of Congress to meet a DREAMer.”

Books That Integrate Current Events Into Your Courses

Below are recommended books you can assign to help students put a face to those affected by the end of DACA.

Lives in Limbo: Undocumented and Coming of Age in America by Roberto G. Gonzales, winner of the 2016 C. Wright Mills Award, Society for the Study of Social Problems

Roberto has written about how DACA beneficiaries contribute to society. He continues to serve as champion to immigrant children and has recently discussed how DACA has affected their mental health and well-being.

“It will stand as the definitive study of the undocumented coming of age in our midst. It is a book every teacher, every policymaker, indeed every concerned citizen should read and ponder.”—Marcelo M. Suárez-Orozco, coeditor of Latinos: Remaking America

 

 

Whose Child Am I?: Unaccompanied, Undocumented Children in U.S. Immigration Custody by Susan J. Terrio

Susan has written about what happens to undocumented children and families in the Trump era. She has also been interviewed regarding her thoughts on U.S. government’s treatment of children and who has access to the American dream.

“An impressive grasp of relevant history, law, policy and practice. Essential reading for anyone interested in one of the US’s most urgent contemporary human rights challenges.”–Jacqueline Bhabha, Harvard University

 

 

Everyday Illegal: When Policies Undermine Immigrant Families by Joanna Dreby, winner of the 2017 Distinguished Contribution to Research Award, Section for Latina/o Sociology, American Sociological Association

Joanna writes about how to tell children not to be afraid. She is committed to discussing and changing policies that undermine immigrant families.

“Eloquent and sharp… an important contribution to the literature on undocumented populations.”—Harvard Educational Review

 

 

 

Dreams and Nightmares: Immigration Policy, Youth, and Families by Marjorie S. Zatz and Nancy Rodriguez

Marjorie speaks frequently about how sweeping political decisions have enormous consequences to swaths of people living in the U.S.

“Highly valuable… this book is a combination of informative resources, rigorous social science research, and is well written to boot!”—Sociology and Social Welfare

 

 

 

 

Returned: Going and Coming in an Age of Deportation by Deborah Boehm

Deborah discusses the fate of returnees and deportees, or “lost citizens.” Her research has focused on migrants’ lives before and after federal custody but she now intends to do research on detention itself.

“Boehm challenges sterile depictions of deportations in the media and political debates. This urgent book is a must read.”—Cecilia Menjívar, author of Immigrant Families

 

See other books on immigration and read the Immigration Syllabus: UC Press Edition#ImmigrationSyllabus


Award Winning Authors at 2017 ASA Conference

Congratulations to our authors for the following illustrious award wins! We are so honored to partner with authors whose works foster a deeper understanding of our world and can change how people think, plan, and govern.

Roberto Gonzales, Lives in Limbo: Undocumented and Coming of Age in America

  • 2016 C. Wright Mills Award, Society for the Study of Social Problems
  • 2016 Pierre Bourdieu Award for the Best Book in Sociology of Education
  • 2017 Outstanding Book Award, American Educational Research Association
  • 2017 Latina and Latino Anthropologists Book Award, Association of Latina and Latino Anthropologists
  • 2017 Herbert Jacob Book Prize, Law and Society Association

Roberto’s book was chosen as the 2016 Common Read at Tufts University. He continues to serve as champion to immigrant children and has recently discussed how DACA has affected their mental health and well-being.

Aldon Morris, The Scholar Denied: W. E. B. Du Bois and the Birth of Modern Sociology

  • 2016 Oliver Cromwell Cox Book Award, Section on Racial and Ethnic Minorities, American Sociological Association
  • 2016 William Julius Wilson Award, Association for Applied and Clinical Sociology
  • 2016 R.R. Hawkins Award, PROSE Award for Excellence
  • 2016 Betty and Alfred McClung Lee Book Award, Association for Humanist Sociology

Aldon has inspired sociologists to reconsider the roots of sociology. He has spoken often about Du Bois’ legacy, from the civil rights movement to Black Lives Matter.

Joanna Dreby, Everyday Illegal: When Policies Undermine Immigrant Families

  • 2017 Distinguished Contribution to Research Award, Section for Latina/o Sociology, American Sociological Association

Joanna adamantly serves as a voice for children who experience an economic and emotional toll when their undocumented parents are deported.

 

Steve Viscelli, The Big Rig: Trucking and the Decline of the American Dream

  • 2017 Outstanding Book Award, Section for Labor and Labor Movements, American Sociological Association

Steve continues to shed light on one of the most grueling jobs in the United States while simultaneously dissecting the employment practices of the trucking industry.

Kelsy Burke, Christians under Covers: Evangelicals and Sexual Pleasure on the Internet

  • 2017 Distinguished Book Award, Section on Sociology of Religion, American Sociological Association

Kelsy considers the contentious relationship between religion and sexuality.

 

Joachim Savelsberg, Representing Mass Violence: Conflicting Responses to Human Rights Violations in Darfur, available as open access on Luminos

  • 2017 Albert J. Reiss Distinguished Scholarship Award, Section for Crime, Law, and Deviance, American Sociological Association
  • 2017 William J. Chambliss Lifetime Achievement Award, Law and Society Division, Society for the Study of Social Problems

Joachim is active in speaking out against genocide, including the Armenian genocide, and the role of international criminal justice in mass atrocities.

Mary Patrice Erdmans and Timothy Black, On Becoming a Teen Mom: Life Before Pregnancy

  • 2017 Distinguished Book Award, Section on Race, Gender and Class, American Sociological Association

Mary Patrice shares her thoughts on the how society views young mothers today.


See these books, as well as some of last year’s award-winning books, at Booth #709 at the Exhibit Hall. While there, request an exam copy for your course. And online, you can purchase a copy for your personal library—use Code 17E9971 to get a 40% discount. The discount code expires August 29, 2017.


ASA Conference 2017: Author Sessions

This year’s American Sociological Association conference in Montreal from August 12 – August 15 includes a lot of exciting sessions featuring some of our wonderful UC Press authors! Youo can see the full online program schedule at ASA’s program finder site#ASA17 #ASA2017

Aldon Morris, The Scholar Denied: W. E. B. Du Bois and the Birth of Modern Sociology

Saturday, August 12, 4:30 to 6:10pm, Intersectional Theorizing and Sociology: Legacies and Future Possibilities, a session inspired by Aldon’s book

Sunday, August 13, 10:30am to 12:10pm, Sociology of W. E. B. Du Bois: To Efforts of Canonization 

Roberto G. Gonzales, Lives in Limbo: Undocumented and Coming of Age in America

Sunday, August 13, 8:30 to 10:10am, Imagined Futures: The Effects of Uncertainty on DACAmented Youth in the United States

 

Sanyu A. Mojola, Love, Money, and HIV: Becoming a Modern African Woman in the Age of AIDS

Monday, August 14, 10:30am to 12:10pm, Author Meets Critic

 

 

James W. Moore, A History of the World in Seven Cheap Things: A Guide to Capitalism, Nature, and the Future of the Planet with Raj Patel

Sunday, August 13, 8:30 to 10:10am, Anthropocene or Capitalocene? Nature in the Making and Unmaking of Historical Capitalism

Monday, August 14, 10:30am to 12:10pm, Oil, Capital and Nature: Do Marx’s General Laws of Production Apply? 

Kevan Harris, A Social Revolution: Politics and the Welfare State in Iran

Tuesday, August 15, 2:30 to 4:10pm, The Future of Muslim Societies: Governance, Movements, and Religion

 

Robert Wyrod, AIDS and Masculinity in the African City: Privilege, Inequality, and Modern Manhood   

Saturday, August 12, 2:30 to 4:10pm, The Gender Question on China’s Second Continent

 

You can also find these authors in other sessions:

 


Immigration Syllabus: UC Press Edition

With last Friday’s executive order on immigration from seven predominantly Muslim countries, along with plans to continue construction of the barrier along the US-Mexico border moving forward, the current presidential administration has brought heightened attention to immigration and American society, and with it, spurred outcry worldwide, and drawn a number of federal lawsuits.

Immigration historians from across the USA have launched #ImmigrationSyllabus, a website and educational resource to help the public understand the historical roots of today’s immigration debates; they have inspired us to follow suit.

Below is a list of UC Press suggested readings, organized in descending order from most recently published, to provide further informed, deeply researched context to the ongoing conversations around immigration reform and citizenship.

Easily and quickly request exam and desk copies online by visiting any of the books’ pages above. If you need assistance in choosing the right texts for your course, we’d be glad to help; contact us here.

Browse more of our history and immigration titles.


Integrating Current Events in Your Courses: Immigration and Latino Studies

Latinos have been integral in the shaping of the U.S. yet their identity is constantly brought into question.

In the wake of the November presidential election and the impending inauguration of Donald Trump, how can you integrate discussions on immigration—particularly from Latin American countries—into your classes?

Help your students understand the effects of today’s political climate. Find new titles for your courses on Immigration or Latino Studies below and click on each title to quickly and easily request an exam copy. Review our exam copy policy. And feel free to email us with questions–we’re here to help!

Select Titles for Your Courses on Immigration and Latino Studies

Almaguer.NewLatinoStudiesReader

The New Latino Studies Reader: A Twenty-First Century Perspective edited by Ramon A. Gutierrez & Tomas Almaguer

“[This reader] brings together the most innovative scholarship being generated within history and the social sciences and is surely to become a standard within Latina/o studies courses.” —Raúl Coronado, inaugural President of the Latina/o Studies Association

“They integrate historical, social scientific and cultural studies approaches, which is rarely done in readers.”—Patricia Zavella, UC Santa Cruz

 

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Lives in Limbo: Undocumented and Coming of Age in America by Roberto G. Gonzales

“Superb. . . . An important examination of the devastating consequences of ‘illegality’ on our young people.”—Junot Díaz, author of The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao and This is How You Lose Her

“It will stand as the definitive study of the undocumented coming of age in our midst. It is a book every teacher, every policymaker, indeed every concerned citizen should read and ponder.”—Marcelo M. Suárez-Orozco, coeditor of Latinos: Remaking America

 

GutmannLesser.GlobalLatinAmericaGlobal Latin America: Into the Twenty-First Century edited by Matthew C. Gutmann and Jeffrey Lesser

“A superb sampling of the cutting edge in connecting approaches across subfields, such as gender studies, Latin American Studies, ethnic studies, and area studies.”—Jerry Dávila, University of Illinois

“The volume is the perfect book for class use in a variety of settings.”—Miguel Angel Centeno, author of State Making in the Developing World

 

 

Boehm.Returned

Returned: Going and Coming in an Age of Deportation by Deborah Boehm

“[Deborah Boehm] challenges sterile depictions of deportations in the media and political debates. This urgent book is a must read.”—Cecilia Menjívar, author of Immigrant Families

“A stellar and nuanced ethnographic exploration of the impact of deportation on Mexican families on both sides of the U.S.-Mexico border. It is a critical addition to existing work on transnationalism and migration, and required reading for academics and policy makers.”—Susan J. Terrio, author of Judging Mohammed

HighCreatives_ads_rev22 Higher Education


Award Winning UC Press Authors at the American Anthropological Association

UC Press is proud to be part of the AAUP’s fifth annual University Press Week. Check out our blog and social media channels through Nov. 19th (plus follow hashtags #ReadUp #UPWeek), and learn how we, along with 40 of our scholarly press colleagues, work diligently to publish vital works benefitting educational, specialized research, and general interest communities.

As the 2016 American Anthropological Association meeting begins, we’re pleased to congratulate four of our authors for the following illustrious award wins! These will be given in person at the annual meeting this week.

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MW DeLeon Portrait (1)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jason DeLeon, author of The Land of Open Graves: Living and Dying on the Migrant Trail is the recipient of the 2016 Margaret Mead Award. Here is what committee members had to say about his book:

This is an incredibly innovative book.  It combines data and analysis from three sub-fields—archaeology, biological anthropology, cultural anthropology.  There is also innovative ethnography.  The theory is new—starting with INS change of policy in order to use the environment as a deterrent and going on to the notion of the hybrid collective. It covers a whole new range of insights in the border between the US and Mexico and undocumented immigrants—a very important issue at this time.

The book includes a fictionalized account of the migrant trail, through which we are introduced to the “everyday terror of the desert”; extended transcripts of conversations with De León’s primary informants and friends; De León’s interspersed scholarship across anthropological fields that contextualizes narratives and conversations; vivid ethnography; the stark photographs by Mike Wells and the author; and the strong discussions on ethics (ethnographic and political), structural violence, inequality and racism. The book is gripping to read, and devastating and haunting.

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Seth Holmes, author of Fresh Fruit, Broken Bodies: Migrant Farmworkers in the United States, is the winner of the 2016 Robert B. Textor and Family Prize for Excellence in Anticipatory Anthropology. Seth’s work was described as “a trenchant ethnography that offers new possibilities for an engaged, empathic anthropology.”

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Stuesse (NS)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Angela Steusse, author of Scratching Out a Living: Latinos, Race, and Work in the Deep South, is the winner of the 2016 Society for the Anthropology of Work Book Prize. 

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Augustin Fuentes, author of Race, Monogamy, and Other Lies They Told You: Busting Myths about Human Nature, is the winner of the 2016 W. W. Howells Book Award in Biological Anthropology. 

9780520287266

Roberto Gonzales, Social Work faculty working with undocumented young adults,

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Roberto G. Gonzales, author of Lives in Limbo: Undocumented and Coming of Age in America, is the winner of the 2016 Latina and Latino Anthropologists Book Award.

Many congratulations, once again, to our authors: we’re proud to have published with them!


¡Celebra!: Books for National Hispanic Heritage Month

Happy National Hispanic Heritage Month! From September 15 to October 15, we recognize Hispanic and Latino Americans, celebrating the heritage, the culture, and the important role these diverse peoples play in the history of the United States.

This month, we’ve prepared a selection of books across disciplines to showcase the unique experiences of Hispanic and Latino Americans. Happy #HispanicHeritage Month, and happy reading!


Lives in Limbo: Undocumented and Coming of Age in America
Roberto G. Gonzales 

This vivid ethnography explores why highly educated undocumented youth share similar work and life outcomes with their less-educated peers. Mining the results of an extraordinary twelve-year study that followed 150 undocumented young adults in Los Angeles, Lives in Limbo exposes the failures of a system that integrates children into K-12 schools but ultimately denies them the rewards of their labor.

“Superb. . . . An important examination of the devastating consequences of ‘illegality’ on our young people.”—Junot Díaz, author of The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao and This is How You Lose Her

 

The New Latino Studies Reader: A Twenty-First-Century Perspective
Ramon A. Gutierrez, Tomas Almaguer (Editors)

The New Latino Studies Reader is designed as a contemporary, updated, multifaceted collection of writings that bring to force the exciting, necessary scholarship of the last decades. Its aim is to introduce a new generation of students to a wide-ranging set of essays that helps them gain a truer understanding of what it’s like to be a Latino in the United States.

“Two of the leading scholars in the field forged this reader in the teaching trenches. This collection represents the perfect balance between cutting-edge scholarship and touchstone essays.”—Natalia Molina, author of How Race Is Made in America: Immigration, Citizenship, and the Historical Power of Racial Scripts

 

Sal Si Puedes (Escape If You Can): Cesar Chavez and the New American Revolution, With a New Foreword by Marc Grossman
Peter Matthiessen

Sal Si Puedes is less reportage than living history. In its pages a whole era comes alive: the Chicano, Black Power, and antiwar movements; the browning of the labor movement; Chavez’s fasts; the nationwide boycott of California grapes. A new foreword by Marc Grossman considers the significance of Chavez’s legacy for our time. As well as serving as an indispensable guide to the 1960s, this book rejuvenates the extraordinary vitality of Chavez’s life and spirit, giving his message a renewed and much-needed urgency.

“Cesar Chavez is gracefully revealed by Peter Matthiessen as a curiously private public figure who is in love with people.”—Chicago Tribune

 

Grit and Hope: A Year with Five Latino Students and the Program That Helped Them Aim for College
Barbara Davenport

Grit and Hope tells the story of five inner-city Hispanic students who start their college applications in the midst of the country’s worst recession and of Reality Changers, the program that aims to help them become the first in their families to go college. Told with deep affection and without sentimentality, the students stories show that although poverty and cultural deprivation seriously complicate youths’ efforts to launch into young adulthood, the support of a strong program makes a critical difference.

“Reality Changers is absolutely a model, not just for the city, not just for the state, but for the country.” —Former Secretary of Education Arne Duncan

 

The Political Spirituality of Cesar Chavez: Crossing Religious Borders
Luis D. León

While there is much debate and truth-seeking around how he is remembered, through investigating the leader’s construction of his own public memory, Luis D. León probes the meaning of the discrepancies. By refocusing Chavez’s life and beliefs into three broad movements—mythology, prophecy, and religion—brings us a moral and spiritual agent to match the political leader.

“Cesar Chavez treated religion as he treated so many topics of importance in his life: as something to be willed into contribution to a higher good… Luis León has written a book equal in grace, compassion, and subtlety to its subject.” —Kathryn Lofton, Professor of Religious Studies, American Studies, History, and Divinity at Yale University

 

From the Jaws of Victory: The Triumph and Tragedy of Cesar Chavez and the Farm Worker Movement
Matthew Garcia

Based on little-known sources and one-of-a-kind oral histories with many veterans of the farm worker movement, this book revises much of what we know about the UFW. Matt Garcia’s gripping account of the expansion of the union’s grape boycott reveals how the boycott, which UFW leader Cesar Chavez initially resisted, became the defining feature of the movement and drove the growers to sign labor contracts in 1970. Garcia also presents in-depth studies of other leaders in the UFW, including Gilbert Padilla, Marshall Ganz, Dolores Huerta, and Jerry Cohen.

“A thorough history of the rise and fall of Cesar Chavez’s United Farm Workers labor union… Meticulous and timely.”—Kirkus Reviews

 

Latinos, Inc.: The Marketing and Making of a People, Updated Edition, with a New Preface
Arlene Dávila

Both Hollywood and corporate America are taking note of the marketing power of the growing Latino population in the United States. Yet the increasing visibility of Latinos in mainstream culture has not been accompanied by a similar level of economic parity or political enfranchisement. In this important, original, and entertaining book, Arlene Dávila provides a critical examination of the Hispanic marketing industry and of its role in the making and marketing of U.S. Latinos.

“A work derived from prodigious fieldwork that sets a standard for the ethnography of cultural institutions in their varied corporate forms and market participations. Latinos Inc. provides a rich, fascinating, and fresh empirical venue for theories of identity and ethnicity in the U.S.”—George Marcus, author of Ethnography Through Thick & Thin


Lives in Limbo

By Roberto G. Gonzales, author of Lives in Limbo: Undocumented and Coming of Age in America

This guest post is published in advance of the American Sociological Association conference in Chicago.Check back every day for new posts through the end of the conference on Tuesday, August 25th. 

Congress’s failure to pass immigration reform has left millions of undocumented immigrants in dire circumstances. For my forthcoming book, Lives in Limbo, I followed a group of 150 undocumented young adults for twelve years. My long term engagement with this group of young people provided me an intimate view of the disastrous effects our immigration policies have had on the more than 2 million children coming of age in the United States.

A Supreme Court decision in Plyler v. Doe permits undocumented children to attend K-12 schools, but once they graduate their futures are uncertain. The young people I came to know moved to the United States as children and grew up in communities around Los Angeles. Following many of my study participants for twelve years gave me a chance to chart the various turns in their lives—More than half of them went to college, over time many of them have had children, several have married, and a handful have become legal permanent residents after very long waits to adjust their status. For the majority of my respondents, however, their life outcomes fell far short of their hopes and expectations.

In 2011 I sat across a factory lunchroom table from Jonathan and Ricardo. Lacking a high school diploma, Jonathan resembled other modestly educated young adults from low-income backgrounds and a narrow range of employment options. Because he was undocumented he had far fewer choices than his American-born high school buddies who had also dropped out of school. Ricardo, with two postsecondary degrees, would have had his choice of attractive job possibilities if he had been a citizen. Several years prior, Ricardo’s good grades and strong network of school and community support allowed him to go much further than Jonathan. But in their late twenties both young men faced the same limited range of options for work.9780520287266

They had reached dead ends. In my conversations with them and the others in my book they described anxieties, chronic sadness, depression, and desire to “not start the day.” Illegality extended far beyond legal exclusions. It reached into their bodies, minds, and hearts.

The American dream is seductive, compelling many to believe that hard work and achievement will garner material success. However, the experiences of my respondents show that this is far from the reality for a significant slice of the American population. Excluded from financial aid and unable to secure the kinds of jobs their legal resident peers were taking, my respondents had no choice but to watch and wait. Life in the shadows enacts a heavy toll and the undocumented young adults in my study are the embodiment of Langston Hughes’ “dream deferred.”

But things are slowly changing. In 2012 the Obama administration initiated the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program. In its first three years DACA beneficiaries have experienced a pronounced increase in economic opportunities and have become more integrated into the nation’s economic and social institutions. They have started new jobs and paid internships, increased their earnings, opened bank accounts and obtained credit cards, and enrolled in health care programs and obtained driver’s licenses. Indeed, DACA has increased undocumented access to work, education, and other milestones in adulthood, but this is not enough. DACA is temporary in duration and partial in coverage. Most importantly, it offers its beneficiaries no respite from long-term uncertainty and legal limbo. The young people I met need immigration reform so that they can have access to the same opportunities their citizen peers do. And they need their schools to do more to integrate them and to prepare them for better futures.

Roberto G. Gonzales is Assistant Professor of Education at Harvard University.