A Dream Ends

This guest post is published around the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences conference in New Orleans, occurring February 13-17, 2018. #ACJS2018 #ACJS18

By Michela Soyer, author of A Dream Denied: Incarceration, Recidivism, and Young Minority Men in America 

Jason’s case is at the core of A Dream Denied. He was one of the youngest respondents and unlike other youths I interviewed he was always eager to speak with me. Everyone I met that had worked with him in the Department of Youth Services (DYS) believed that Jason was “a good kid”. After I finished my research he and I kept in touch sporadically and remained Facebook friends. When I spoke to his mother right before I handed in the final manuscript of A Dream Denied, she told me that he was doing well, mostly staying out of trouble. I had also noticed in my Facebook feed that Jason was going to be a father. He was so proud that he decided to make the ultrasound picture of his unborn daughter his new background photo. I thought that becoming father could be a turning point for him. He had always enjoyed taking care of children and maybe this new role would give his life the focus he needed.

… Jason died almost exactly a year ago.

From what I was able to piece together through news items and his Facebook feed, it seemed that the car Jason died in was stolen. His daughter was barely 7 month old when she lost her father.

I expected Jason to struggle. I assumed that he would recidivate, maybe even end up in juvenile prison. In the end however, I wanted to believe that he was going to be ok. When he heard about this death, I realized that even though I titled my book A Dream Denied, I still believed that someone like Jason—a charismatic, energetic, and caring young man—will simply age out of crime and will be able to support himself without dealing drugs or committing robberies. Jason always dreamed big. He wanted to build his own business. Even though he did not know exactly what he wanted to sell, I believed that if anyone could do it, it was Jason who would be able to build a better future for himself. His death is a reminder for myself that even as a qualitative sociologist I am only able to scratch the surface of the extremely complex lives of those I study.

More than other young men I interviewed, Jason struggled with the rigid structure of the Boston Juvenile Justice system. He craved autonomy and I had hoped that once he was able to find a way of expressing himself creatively, he would stabilize his life. Like most of the youths I met during my research for A Dream Denied, Jason was not a hardened criminal. It was easy to imagine that had he grown up under more affluent circumstances, he may simply have struggled with his identity like any teenager. His family would have not had to rely on the juvenile justice system to get social services for their son. Having the financial means to move into a good school district, to pay for engaging after school activities and private counseling services are what separates upper middle class families from Jason’s home. Money cannot insulate anyone from tragedy, yet it affords youths like Jason the opportunity to self-correct without being funneled into the juvenile justice system.

Jason’s death could simply be written off as an individual tragedy. After all, he died in car accident after he had experienced what the press described as a “medical emergency”. Jason’s story however, is more than an individual quest for agency gone wrong. His death signifies that even a fairly well funded juvenile justice system, like the Department of Youth Services in Boston, can only offer temporary solutions to deeply ingrained social problems.


Michaela Soyer is Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology at Hunter College.


Destination LA: College Art Association 2018

The College Art Association annual conference is taking place on the West Coast this year, convening in Los Angeles next week.

We welcome attendees to our home state, and look forward to connecting at the conference.

Visit Us at Booth #307

Save 40% on new and notable Art titles. Request an exam copy of books designed for course use, such as these two new texts on the Art Market. Sign up for our Art eNews list in the booth to be automatically entered in our daily conference prize drawing for the book of your choice.

Attend Our Session

University of California Press invites you to our exhibitor session: Creative Art Book Promotion and How to Find Audiences That Matter on Friday, February 23rd, 8:30AM–10:00AM. The panel will be chaired by UC Press’s Senior Marketing Manager, Aimée Goggins, with Tyler Green, historian and producer/host of The Modern Art Notes Podcast; Anastasia Aukeman, Parsons School of Design; Maureen Winter, Getty Publications; and Kate Koza, Bookforum as panelists.


Meet Our Authors at ACJS 2018

This year’s ACJS meeting in New Orleans from February 13 – 17 includes exciting presentations by some of our authors, highlighting titles that confront the criminal justice crisis and serve as a catalyst for change. #ACJS2018 #ACJS18

Get 40% off of new and notable titles by visiting Booth #402. Or request an exam copy for course adoption consideration.

Walter S. DeKeseredy and Martin D. Schwartz, co authors with Molly Dragiewicz of Abusive Endings: Separation and Divorce Violence against Women

Thursday, 2/15 at 11:00am, Hilton 3rd Floor: Norwich, Gender and Crime: Victims and Responses, “Technology-Assisted Stalking and Image-Based Sexual Abuse on the College Campus: The Role of Negative Peer Support”

Read their thoughts on image-based sexual abuse.

Dean Dabney, coauthor with Richard Tewksbury of Speaking Truth to Power: Confidential Informants and Police Investigations

Friday, 2/16 at 11:00am, Hilton 2nd Floor: Marlborough A, Navigating the Job Market in Criminology and Criminal Justice

Friday, 2/16 at 2:00pm, Hilton 1st Floor: Grand Salon 12, Leadership Partnerships: Dealing with the Shrinking Applicant Pool in Policing/Police Administration and Management

Read their thoughts on why it’s important to link teaching, practice, and research in police intelligence.

Leon Anderson, author of Deviance: Social Constructions and Blurred Boundaries

Friday, 2/16 at 12:30pm, Hilton 3rd Floor: Windsor, Designing Criminal Justice Curriculum, “Integrating Paradigms in Teaching Deviance and Criminology”

Read Leon’s thoughts on sexual assaults occurring on college campuses.

Barbara Owen, coauthor with James Wells and Joycelyn Pollock of In Search of Safety: Confronting Inequality in Women’s Imprisonment

Saturday, 2/16 at 8:00am, Hilton 1st Floor: Grand Salon 19, Comparative Issues in Courts and Corrections, “Research and Hunan Rights: Foreign National Women’s Experience of Imprisonment in Cambodia”

Read their thoughts on why, with #metoo and #timesup, women in prison also need a movement.

 


For ACJS, Senior Editor Maura Roessner Defines “Impact”

Before heading out to New Orleans for the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences Conference (February 13-17, 2018), Maura Roessner—Senior Editor of Criminology, Criminal Justice, and Law and Society,—shares her thoughts on what authors should focus on when writing a book that makes an impact. 

What advice would you give to an author who wants to communicate broadly?

Think about the book that needs to be read, not just the book that you want to write.

Know your audience and write for that reader. Imagine your readers in terms of their experiences, motivations, educational or professional background, memberships, reading and writing habits. How are you going to engage them? How do you want them to think or act differently after reading your book?

And the book is obviously just one method of communicating to a particular audience. Join the conversation wherever it may be taking place: on Twitter or Facebook, op-ed pages, your regional society’s newsletter. Leverage your networks, speak and write widely, connect with your campus public relations staff—these are all strategies for accumulating visibility for your work as a whole, not just your latest book.

What are the ways that author and publishers define impact?

I love that this year’s ACJS conference theme is “So What?” It’s a question I always ask authors, not to be dismissive, but to get at solutions, which are at the heart of engaged scholarship. At UC Press, we strongly believe in the power of scholarship to achieve social transformation, and we seek to position our authors as change agents whose research can influence the ways we think and plan and govern.

There are lots of incremental and mutually reinforcing elements of “impact” beyond the traditional citation count. Authors work in a whole ecosystem of ideas brimming with countless potential amplifiers and influencers: news media coverage, blogs and social media, podcasts and Ted talks, legislative hearings…the list is endless. Last week alone our authors and books were mentioned in outlets that reached more than 60 million potential viewers, and each one of those hits can help shape public opinion or pave the way for better policies and practices around a host of issues.

Book reviews or sales might register some key indicators of impact, but they aren’t the whole story. We also think about impact across the academy (can open access business models drive awareness and usage of research monographs amid declining print sales and library budgets?) and in the classroom (can we develop a textbook that disrupts the way a class may have been taught, uncritically and unchanged, for years?).

What are some upcoming books that illustrate the real-world impact of your authors’ research?

James Garbarino’s Miller’s Children: Why Giving Teenage Killers a Second Chance Matters for All of Us takes us up close in the lives of people who have committed horrific murders while juveniles. Though sentenced to life without parole, they were granted the possibility a second chance when the Supreme Court ruled such sentences unconstitutional (Miller v. Alabama and Montgomery v. Louisiana). Yet when Garbarino interviewed these young men written off as monsters, he discovered their extraordinary capacity for rehabilitation and redemption. Exploring the science of how young brains can be rewired for second chances, and offering an entire chapter on “Translating Hope into Law and Practice,” Garbarino clearly demonstrates how law and policy can chip away at cycles of violence.

 

 

Kathleen Fox, Jodi Lane, and Susan Turner’s Encountering Correctional Populations: A Practical Guide for Researchers promises to be a practical toolkit for academics and practitioners alike who are interested in research with people in jails, prisons, and juvenile facilities and on probation or parole. With soaring numbers of Americans caught up in the correctional system—and increasing difficulties for researchers seeking to gain access to them—it’s more important than ever to develop research that “gives voice to the voiceless.” This kind of step-by-step guide is filled with real-world examples, tips, and templates that readers can put to immediate use.

The list goes on, and we’re thrilled to count so many engaged and activist scholars on the list who relentlessly pursue a research agenda that can help to identify and eradicate social inequalities.

 

Meet Maura at ACJS at the Exhibit Hall, Booth 402. And see titles that Maura has acquired to help Confront the Criminal Justice Crisis as these authors and books aim to make an impact. #ACJS2018 #ACJS18 #WSC2018  

 


Attend Our Session at College Art Association

For the first time ever, conference exhibitors were invited to submit panel proposals for the 2018 College Art Association Annual Conference in Los Angeles.

The CAA Annual Conference is the largest gathering of professionals in the visual arts in the world, with over 300 panels and dozens of professional development workshops and events. The College Art Association encourages anyone who is interested in the arts, works in the arts, is looking for a job in the arts, or works in higher education to try to attend the conference.* The last time it was in Los Angeles was 2012. It’s not quite Halley’s Comet, but it’s not too far off either.

We are thrilled to have our session on the program for Friday morning, February 23rd—please plan your conference schedule so that you can join us!


CREATIVE ART BOOK PROMOTION AND HOW TO FIND AUDIENCES THAT MATTER

Friday, February 23rd

8:30AM–10:00AM

Room 511A

This moderator-led panel will bring together a variety of art world and publishing industry experts to discuss perspectives on promoting your book beyond the academy. Our team of panelists include:

Tyler Green is an historian and an award-winning critic who has produced and hosted The Modern Art Notes Podcast since 2011. The MAN Podcast is a weekly, hour-long interview program featuring artists, historians, authors, curators and conservators, that the BBC named one of the world’s top 25 cultural podcasts that would “blow your mind,” and “enrich your life”. His forthcoming book, Carleton Watkins: Making the West American, will be published by University of California Press in 2018.

Anastasia Aukeman is an art historian and curator who teaches at Parsons School of Design in New York City. Her book Welcome to Painterland: Bruce Conner and the Rat Bastard Protective Association was published in 2016 (UC Press), coinciding with the BRUCE CONNER retrospective at MoMA and SFMOMA. Anastasia curated related exhibitions at the Landing Gallery in Los Angeles and the Susan Inglett Gallery in New York City.

Maureen Winter is Associate Publisher at Getty Publications and directs the Sales and Marketing department. This role gives her practical insight into what resonates in the market and how authors can successfully work with their publishers. Prior to joining the Getty Maureen spent 12 years in sales, marketing & rights at the illustrated trade publisher, Black Dog & Leventhal.

Kate Koza is Associate Publisher of Bookforum and the Director of Strategic Communication for Artforum. In these roles, Kate establishes and manages partnerships with cultural organizations and literary venues, facilitating a wide variety of private and public events, and oversees advertising opportunities for trade, university, and art-book publishers. She curates content for Bookforum’s digital channels, guides long-term planning and strategy, and generally helps support an ecosystem of engaged arts and culture enthusiasts.

Aimée Goggins, Senior Marketing Manager at University of California Press will chair the panel, and topics will include how to pitch your work to non-specialists, partnering with your publisher to ensure your success, positioning yourself for interviews and speaking engagements, tips for connecting your work to contemporary culture and dialogue, how and when to think about the different audiences for your book, supporting a book release outside the traditional author talk, and the panelists will share their own relevant experiences and stories.

Come ready to learn, to share your ideas and questions, and to expand your views on art publishing today.

*Advance registration for the conference ends on February 7. Review the full schedule.


Save 40% with UC Press at 2018 Western Society of Criminology Conference

The 2018 WSC Conference convenes February 1 – 3 in Long Beach, CA. Senior Editor Maura Roessner will be in attendance; email or contact her @Maura_R if you’d like to learn more about working with her to become a UC Press author or reviewer.  #missiondriven

See Maura with #WSC2018 President Hadar Aviram and author Valerie Jenness at 3:30pm today as they discuss “From Scholarship to Impact” at the presidential plenary.

And see Susan F. Turner on Saturday at 12:45pm as she discusses “Lifer Reentry and Community Reintegration: An Analysis of Paroled Lifers in Los Angeles.”

You can check out the following UC Press titles in Criminology, Criminal Justice, and Law and Society with books that focus on incarceration, corrections, policing, gender, immigration, school to prison pipeline, and much more. And read more from our authors such as WSC President Hadar Aviram, Nikki Jones, Patrick Lopez-Aguado, and much more.

Save 40% online with discount code 17E2829, or request an exam copy for consideration to use in your upcoming classes.


Visit UC Press at AIASCS. Save 40% on Our Ancient World Titles

As the joint annual meeting of the Archaeological Institute of America and the Society for Classical Studies takes place this week in Boston—amidst a cyclone bomb, no less—be sure to visit UC Press at booth #110 for a 40% discount on our new and notable Ancient World titles. From a vivid new translation of Homer to newly unearthed archaeological discoveries, our Ancient World titles offer a wide variety of subjects appropriate for your research and classroom use.

Couldn’t make it to the conference due to adverse weather conditions? Visit our AIA / SCS page to take advantage of the conference discount.


The Contemporary Afterlives of Sexual Science

By Veronika Fuechtner, co-editor, with Douglas E. Haynes and Ryan M. Jones, of A Global History of Sexual Science, 1880–1960

This guest post is part of our AHA blog series published in conjunction with the meeting of the American Historical Association in Washington, DC, Jan. 4-7. #AHA18


Currently laws and practices relating to sex, gender and sexuality are experiencing momentous shifts on a global scale – be it in the upcoming referendum on abortion in Ireland, the recent recognition of a “third sex” in Germany, last year’s ruling of India’s supreme court that banned discrimination based on sexual orientation, or the legalization of same-sex marriage in Australia a month ago.  These shifts are usually presented as shifts based on changed social experiences, but they also are based in significant shifts in scientific understandings of sexuality.

Investigating the history of the global traffic of scientific ideas on sexuality has shown us how deeply entrenched particular scientific assumptions about masculinity and femininity still are, e.g., the connection of homosexuality with effeminacy, the hunt for bodily signs for what were considered deviant sexualities, the assumption that monogamy was natural, or the notion that a woman was not to be in charge of her own sexual and/or reproductive life.

Our book A Global History of Sexual Science emerged out of the recognition that these assumptions did not simply migrate from the “West” to the “rest,” but that they were the result of complex, mutually constitutive interactions and global networks.  The field of sexual science emerged not just in Europe and North America but in a variety of global locations, such as India, Chile, or China.  Its proponents in different parts of the world were intensely aware of each other and interacted through publications, conferences, or travel. Moreover, proponents of sexual science in Europe and North America adopted notions forged in exchange with actors in Asia, Latin America and Africa, e.g., the US practice of gender reassignment surgery was heavily influenced by earlier Mexican cases or the German legal understanding of homosexuality was tested and contested in its colonial African courts.  Our book draws attention to many figures who have been forgotten in contemporary work on sexuality or sexual science.  Some of these figures drew from the repressive legal, social and cultural discourses that limited sexual expression and gave the ideological grounds to discrimination and persecution.  But others – and they were at times the very same figures – connected to the liberating discourses, the power of which we are experiencing today.


Veronika Fuechtner is Associate Professor of German at Dartmouth College and Adjunct Professor of Psychiatry at the Geisel School of Medicine. She is the author of Berlin Psychoanalytic and coeditor of Imagining Germany Imagining Asia. 

Douglas E. Haynes is Professor of History at Dartmouth College. He is the author of Rhetoric and Ritual in Colonial India and Small Town Capitalism in Western India and coeditor of Contesting Power and Towards a History of Consumption in South Asia.

Ryan M. Jones is Assistant Professor of History at SUNY Geneseo and the author of a forthcoming book on Mexican sexuality entitled Erotic Revolutions.


Beyond Race, Ethnicity, and Nationalism in the Global Square

This post is published during the American Historical Association conference in Washington, D.C. (Jan. 4-7).  

 

 

Now more than ever, discussions of race, ethnicity, and nationalism must take a global perspective. Cultures, histories, and societies are racialized as more and more people cross borders. The boundaries of each nation are no longer geographical; instead, we find that one culture can profoundly affect another.

The Global Square

The Global Square Series features volumes focused on how regions and countries interact with the rest of the contemporary world. Each volume analyzes the tensions, inequalities, and challenges inherent in global relationships. Drawing on work by journalists, artists, and academics from a range of disciplines—from the humanities to the sciences, from history to public health to literature—these collections showcase essays on the histories, cultures, and societies of countries and regions as they develop in conjunction with and contradiction of other geographic centers.

Latin America

In Jeffrey Lesser’s and Matthew C. Gutmann’s Global Latin America: Into the Twenty-First Century, volume contributors share impact of Latin America on the rest of the world, with the editors using Che Guevara as a small example of how Latin American countries impact our global culture, economy, and politics.

 

 

 

Africa

And in Judith Byfield’s and Dorothy Hodgson’s Global Africa: Into the Twenty-First Century, volume contributors discuss the entangled histories of the region, with the editors bringing to light the racialized divide within Africa—and encouraging how to go beyond it.

 

 

Visit UC Press booth #430 for a 40% discount at #AHA18! And learn more about the Global Square Series.


Must-Read Journals for #AHA18

The American Historical Association is convening in Washington, DC for its 132nd annual meeting from January 4-7, 2018. The theme for this year’s conference is “Race, Ethnicity, and Nationalism in Global Perspective.” UC Press’s history journals are contributing to the conversation by making a selection of content speaking to this theme available for free for a limited time. Please follow the links below and share your comments on social media using #AHA18.


Pacific Historical Review Special Issue:
Alternative Wests: Rethinking Manifest Destiny
Guest Edited by Andrew C. Isenberg

The mid-nineteenth century territorial growth of the United States was complex and contradictory. Not only did Mexico, Britain, and Native Americans contest U.S. territorial objectives; so, too, did many within the United States and in some cases American western settlers themselves. The notion of manifest destiny reflects few of these complexities. Manifest destiny was a partisan idea that emerged in a context of division and uncertainty intended to overawe opponents of expansion. Only in the early twentieth century, as the United States had consolidated its hold on the North American West and was extending its power into the Caribbean and Pacific, did historians begin to describe manifest destiny as something that it never was in the nineteenth century: a consensus. To a significant extent, historians continue to rely on the idea to explain U.S. expansion. This Special Issue argues for returning a sense of context and contingency to the understanding of mid-nineteenth-century U.S. expansion. Read the special issue.

 

Historical Studies in the Natural Sciences offers the following articles on the #AHA18 theme for you to read for free for a limited time:

Instruments of Science or Conquest: Neocolonialism and Modern American Astronomy
Leandra Swanner

Fellow Travelers and Traveling Fellows: The Intercontinental Shaping of Modern Mathematics in Mid-Twentieth Century Latin America
Michael J. Barany

Darwin and the Ethnologists: Liberal Racialism and the Geological Analogy
Suman Seth

Retouching the Past with Living Things: Indigenous Species, Tradition, and Biological Research in Republican China, 1918-1937
Lijing Jiang

Bred for the Race: Thoroughbred Breeding and Racial Science in the United States, 1900-1940
Brian Terrell

Visualizing ‘Race’ in the Eighteenth Century
Snait B. Missis

Master of the Master Gland: Choh Hao Li, the University of California, and Science, Migration, and Race
Benjamin C. Zulueta

 

Boom California invites you to read its series of articles on “Undocumented California.”

Undocumented Californians and the Future of the Golden State
Manuel Pastor

Regarding the Documents: Scanning the Mythology of ‘Documented’ California
Jason S. Sexton

California Dreaming? The Integration of Immigrants into American Society
Kevin R. Johnson

The Américas: A Novel of California Begun
David Kipen

On the Road to Opportunity: Racial Disparities in Obtaining an AB 60 Driver Licenses
Laura E. Enriquez, Daisy Vazquez Vera, and S. Karthick Ramakrishnan

California’s Opportunities for Undocumented Students: Are They Enough?
Tanya Golash-Boza and Zulema Valdez

Undocumented Emotional Intelligence: Learning from the Intellectual Investments of California’s Undergraduates
Ana Elizabeth Rosas

Lines and Fences: Writing and Rewriting the California Fence/Wall
Marcel Brousseau

 

Southern California Quarterly Special Virtual Issue:
Home Strategies: Class, Race, and Empowerment in 20th Century Los Angeles

The Southern California Quarterly, published continuously (under this and earlier titles) since 1884 by the Historical Society of Southern California, has touched repeatedly on the themes of housing development, discrimination, and empowerment. In this virtual issue, we present a sampling of its contributions on these themes. Read the virtual issue.

 

 

California History offers the following articles on the #AHA18 theme for you to read for free for a limited time:

Teaching Race in California History Beyond Domination and Diversity
Daniel Martinez HoSang

Victory Abroad, Disaster at Home: Environment, Race, and World War II Shipyard Production
Alistair W. Fortson

Language Education, Race, and the Remaking of American Citizenship in Los Angeles, 1900–1968
Zevi Gutfreund

But Why Glendale? A History of Armenian Immigration to Southern California
Daniel Fittante

Resisting Camelot: Race and Resistance to the San Fernando Valley Secession Movement
Jean-Paul R. deGuzman

 

The Public Historian Special Virtual Issue:
Monuments, Memory, Politics, and Our Publics

The Public Historian, the official journal of the National Council on Pubic History, shares a special virtual issue featuring dozen essays from the journal’s backlist, ranging across some twenty years, that illustrate the evolving historiography on the issue of monuments, memory, history, and heritage and broaden the discussion beyond the focus of the Civil War, Redemption, and resistance to the expansion of civil rights during the 1960s and 1970s.