We’re excited to announce that three UC Press authors will be featured on panels at the Los Angeles Times Festival of Books this weekend.

Marcus Anthony Hunter, co-author of Chocolate Cities: The Black Map of American Life, will serve as moderator on the panel History: The Problem of Slavery’s Intransigent Legacy.”

“History: The Problem of Slavery’s Intransigent Legacy” (Conversation 2011)
Sunday April 22, 2018
10:30am – 11:30am
Hancock Foundation, Signing Area 1
Politics & History

Marcus Anthony Hunter is Chair of the Department of African American Studies, Associate Professor of Sociology, and he holds the Scott Waugh Endowed Chair in the Division of the Social Sciences at the University of California, Los Angeles. He is the author of Black Citymakers: How the Philadelphia Negro Changed Urban America and the president of the Association of Black Sociologists.

Read more from Marcus and co-author Zandria Robinson on their thoughts on why Los Angeles is still part of The South and how Black lives are affected by current policies today.

Also on Sunday, The Rise of Extremism will feature Khaled Beydoun (American Islamophobia: Understanding the Roots and Rise of Fear) and Michael Kimmel (Healing from Hate: How Young Men Get Into—and Out of—Violent Extremism) in a discussion on extremist ideology and what attracts individuals to being radicalized.

 

“The Rise of Extremism” (Conversation 2072)
Sunday April 22, 2018
12:30pm – 1:30pm

Ronald Tutor Campus Center, Signing Area 3

Three authors will discuss the attraction and impact of extremist ideologies on the panel “The Rise of Extremism” (Sun. Apr. 22, 12:30 p.m.), moderated by The Times’ Matt Pearce.

Professor Khaled A. Beydoun, author of “American Islamophobia: Understanding the Roots and Rise of Fear” will be joined by sociologist Michael Kimmel, whose new book “Healing from Hate” looks at what causes young men to join — and also leave — American neo-Nazi and white nationalist groups. The third author on their panel is Norwegian journalist Åsne Seierstad, among those traveling farthest to attend the festival, whose riveting new book examines how two generations flee from and return to extremism: “Two Sisters: A Father, His Daughters, and Their Journey into the Syrian Jihad.”

Khaled A. Beydoun is Associate Professor of Law at the University of Detroit Mercy School of Law and Senior Affiliated Faculty at the University of California–Berkeley Islamophobia Research and Documentation Project. A critical race theorist, he examines Islamophobia, the war on terror, and the salience of race and racism in American law. His scholarship has appeared in top law journals, including the California Law Review, Columbia Law Review, and Harvard Civil Rights–Civil Liberties Law Review. In addition, he is an active public intellectual and advocate whose commentary has been featured in the New York Times and Washington Post as well as on the BBC, Al Jazeera English, ESPN, and more. He is a native of Detroit and has been named the 2017 American-Arab Anti-Discrimination Committee Advocate of the Year and the Arab American Association of New York’s 2017 Community Champion of the Year.

Read more on Khaled’s thoughts on the deeply-ingrained history of Islamophobia in America on the UC Press Blog.

Michael Kimmel is one of the world’s leading experts on men and masculinities. He is the SUNY Distinguished Professor of Sociology and Gender Studies at Stony Brook University and the author of Manhood in America, Angry White Men, The Politics of Manhood, The Gendered Society, and Guyland. With funding from the MacArthur Foundation, he founded the Center for the Study of Men and Masculinities at Stony Brook in 2013.

Check out Michael’s #HealingFromHate series on the UC Press Blog.

 

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