Banned Books Week 2017: Political Engagement and Democracy

As Banned Books Week continues, we share recommended reading lists that promote the freedom to seek and express ideas. At UC Press, we believe that scholarship is a powerful tool for fostering a deeper understanding of our world to change how people, think, plan, and govern.

Below are titles that address society’s core challenges and serve as agents of engagement and democracy. #BannedBooksWeek #RightToRead #ReadUP

Ending September 30th, get a 30% discount on these selected titles below.

Exceptional America: What Divides Americans from the World and from Each Other by Mugambi Jouet

“Seeking to understand rather than condemn, Jouet offers a rich and revealing portrait of the America that produced President Donald J. Trump.” —Jacob S. Hacker, Professor of Political Science and Director of the Institution for Social and Policy Studies, Yale University

“Sheds fresh light on the peculiar and alarming state of U.S. politics today.”—Dorothy Roberts, Professor of Law and Sociology, University of Pennsylvania, and author of Fatal Invention: How Science, Politics, and Big Business Re-create Race in the Twenty-first Century.

 

From Fascism to Populism in History by Federico Finchelstein

“Timely, accessible, and essential reading. Federico Finchelstein expertly reminds us how vital history is for understanding the present and how important it is to look beyond our own borders to get come to grips with local phenomena.”  —Tanya Harmer, author of Allende’s Chile and the Inter-American Cold War

“An original, creative, and bold work that will be debated by scholars for decades to come.”—Carlos de la Torre, author of Populist Seduction in Latin America

 

A History of the World in Seven Cheap Things: A Guide to Capitalism, Nature, and the Future of the Planet by Raj Patel and Jason W. Moore

“As we come together to build a better world, this book could well become a defining framework to broaden and deepen our ambitions.”—Naomi Klein, author of No Is Not Enough and This Changes Everything

“[A] compelling interpretation of how we got to where we are now, and how we might go on to create a more just and sustainable civilization. It’s a vision you can put to use.”—Kim Stanley Robinson, author of the Mars trilogy

 

The Fifty-Year Rebellion: How the U.S. Political Crisis Began in Detroit by Scott Kurashige

“Scott Kurashige’s wonderful, important book teaches us to read neoliberal crisis and austerity from below, as a reaction to forces of liberation that came before and continue today.”—Michael Hardt, coauthor of Assembly

“Scott Kurashige’s work will introduce a new generation of scholars, activists, intellectuals, artists, and citizens to what many of us have said for a while—the story of the 20th and 21st centuries is the story of Detroit.”—Lester K. Spence, Associate Professor of Political Science and Africana Studies, Johns Hopkins University, and author of Knocking the Hustle: Against the Neoliberal Turn in Black Politics