Must-read articles for LGBTQ History Month

In celebration of LGBTQ History Month this October, enjoy free access to articles from Feminist Media Histories, a journal that examines the role gender has played in media technologies across a range of historical periods and global contexts. These must-read articles will be freely available throughout the month of October.


"Poster for Club de femmes (1936)." (From article)
Poster for Club de femmes (1936). (From article)

Proto-Queer Media Criticism: “Cinema Ramblings” from an RKO Secretary
Candace Moore
(Vol. 1, No. 1, Winter 2014)

Lisa Ben’s “Cinema Ramblings” in the 1940s underground publication Vice Versa mark some of the first media reviews to focus on homosexual themes, representations, and subtexts from a self-proclaimed lesbian perspective. While still largely unknown, the critical lenses and stylistic methods she employed set a precedent for the kind of radical queer media criticism that reviewers engage in today.

Mod Pop Methods: This Year’s Girl
Quinlan Miller
(Vol. 1, No. 1, Winter 2014)

This article reconstructs queer popular culture as a way of exploring media production studies as a trans history project. Miller argues that queer and trans insights into gender are indispensable to feminist media studies. The article looks at The Ugliest Girl in Town series (ABC, 1968–69), a satire amplifying a purported real-life fad in flat chests, short haircuts, and mod wigs, to restore texture to the everyday landscape of popular entertainment.

"Figure 5. FIGURE 5 11, 3, 5, 9, Lesbians are mighty fine' in Home Movie." (From article)
“11, 3, 5, 9, Lesbians are mighty fine” in Home Movie (1972). (From article)

Lesbian Feminist Cinema’s Archive and Moonforce Media’s National Women’s Film Circuit
Roxanne Samer
(Vol. 1, No. 2, Spring 2015)

This essay offers a microhistory of the feminist film distributor Moonforce Media. Between 1975 and 1980, Moonforce Media built the National Women’s Film Circuit, a lesbian feminist distribution system that circulated preconstituted packages of multigeneric feminist films through as wide a nontheatrical feminist U.S. market as possible.

“Feeling-Images”: Montage, Body, and Historical Memory in Barbara Hammer’s Nitrate Kisses
Alessandra Chiarini
(Vol. 2, No. 3, Summer 2016)

This essay investigates the ways in which Barbara Hammer’s film Nitrate Kisses (1992) traces stories about homosexuality throughout the twentieth century. Inspired both by the concept of “vertical cinema,” as theorized by Maya Deren, and by the historical-philosophical reflections of Michel Foucault and Walter Benjamin, Hammer realizes a montage process in Nitrate Kisses that resurrects a forgotten historical memory through the juxtaposition of archival materials and original images. It is a memory that is reappropriated through the film as an experiential, tactile, and emotional moment.


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“Women in Cinema & Media” – Celebrating SCMS 2016 with Film Quarterly and Feminist Media Histories

To celebrate the 2016 annual conference for the Society for Cinema & Media Studies, which kicks off tomorrow in Atlanta, we are pleased to offer a collection of limited-time free articles from Film Quarterly and Feminist Media Histories that together honor “Women in Cinema & Media.” Enjoy free access to these articles today through the end of the meeting on April 3, and be sure to meet the editors if you are attending the conference!


 

3.cover-source-2FILM QUARTERLY

Editor: B. Ruby Rich, Associate Editor: Regina Longo, Book Review Editor: Noah Isenberg

*SCMS attendees: Meet the editors on Friday, April 1 (12:15-2:00pm) in Room 205, Second Floor (Hilton Atlanta).

 

 

Cover Your Webcam: Unencrypting Laura Poitras’s Citizenfour (Lisa Parks)

Giving Credit to Paratexts and Parafeminism in Top of the Lake and Orange Is the New Black (Kathleen A. McHugh)

The Vulnerable Spectator: Minnie and Me and the Living Girls (Amelie Hastie)

Candida Royalle, 1950–2015 (Constance Penley)

Follow Film Quarterly Facebook and Twitter for updates at #SCMS16 .

 

1.cover-source-1FEMINIST MEDIA HISTORIES

Editor: Shelley Stamp, Managing Editor: Christina Corfield

*SCMS attendees: Meet the editors on Thursday, March 31 (11:00am-12:00pm) at the UC Press booth (Hilton Atlanta). Be sure to keep an eye out for the SCMS Women’s Caucus Graduate Student Writing Prize! The 2016 winner will be announced at the SCMS Women’s Caucus meeting on 3/31, and the 2017 contest is now open for submissions.

 

Something More Than a Seduction Story: Shiga Akiko’s Abortion Scandal and Late 1930s Japanese Film Culture (Chika Kinoshita)

Lesbian Feminist Cinema’s Archive and Moonforce Media’s National Women’s Film Circuit (Roxanne Samer)

Paper Girls: Gender and Materiality in Turn-of-the-Century Outdoor Advertising (Beth Corzo-Duchardt)

Nené Cascallar’s Thirsty Heart: Gender, Voice, and Desire in a 1950s Argentine Radio Serial (Christine Ehrick)

Follow Feminist Media Histories Facebook and Twitter for updates at #SCMS16.


New and notable from SCMS 2015, Montréal, Canada

By Mary Francis, Executive Editor, Cinema & Media Studies

What’s new? That is always the biggest question in an editor’s mind going to big annual conference (right up there with, where can I get a really good espresso?*). As a publisher, there is nothing more gratifying than having a colleague approach our exhibit table with that question. And this year was a doozy for us, with a hot-of-the-press number of Film Quarterly, a new sibling in the journals family, Feminist Media Histories, a set of great interviews with media industry insiders, new translations of Bazin, stellar new books on film sound, cinema and the Parisian avant-garde, amateur film, cinematography, ‘lens and screen arts,’ the life and work of Lois Weber, and much more.

IMG_0476

As the publisher who wants to bring more of “what’s new?” to the world the Society for Cinema and Media Studies is a feast of timely possibilities: we are all steeped in audio-visual media every day, and SCMS is a great place to learn about, and understand the many ways that our lives are influenced and affected by it all. As a representative of a progressive university press, always looking for work that explores what it means to be an engaged citizen, this year’s program offered plenty of enticing possibilities: a plethora of ways to understand the performances and genres we consume on screen; grapples with newest ways (legal or not, free or not) to access moving image content; rich introductions to the cutting-edge moving image work in galleries; the in’s and out’s of media industries around the world; thought-provoking work on how and why what we watch is (and isn’t) regulated and controlled and by whom. It was great to see so many panels that addressed teaching: there was a lot of energy dedicated to talking about the best ways to introduce students to great films, to great texts, to important concepts about media literacy, to raise awareness of active and intelligent consumption.

*My answer this year: http://tunnelespresso.ca/