5 High-Impact Articles in Sustainability Transitions & Sustainable Engineering

This week we have the pleasure of announcing that Elementa: Science of the Anthropocene has been accepted into the Science Citation Index Expanded and is expected to get an Impact Factor in June 2018, as confirmed by Clarivate Analytics. We thought his news would be of interest to attendees of the AGU Fall Meeting, and we invite those at #AGU17 to visit Elementa at booth #1820, where the journal is featured alongside DataONE and DataCite.

We are pleased that we can soon add an Impact Factor to the many ways we measure Elementa‘s impact. Today, as part of Elementa‘s #AGU17 blog series, we present high-impact content—as measured by views, downloads, Scopus citations, and Altmetric scores—from our Sustainability Transitions and Sustainable Engineering domains.


Sustainability Transitions
Editor-in-Chief: Anne R. Kapuscinski, Dartmouth

5 High-Impact Articles
(All metrics from December 8, 2017. Citation Source: Scopus)

Expert opinion on extinction risk and climate change adaptation for biodiversity
Javeline D, Hellmann JJ, McLachlan JS, Sax DF, Schwartz MW, et al. 2015.
Impact: 510,200 views/downloads, 6 citations, and Altmetric Score 69 since original publication on July 15, 2015

Carrying capacity of U.S. agricultural land: Ten diet scenarios
Peters CJ, Picardy J, Darrouzet-Nardi AF, Wilkins JL, Griffin TS, et al. 2016.
Impact: 92,506 views/downloads, 5 citations, and Altmetric Score 669 since original publication on July 22, 2016

Enhancing agroecosystem performance and resilience through increased diversification of landscapes and cropping systems
Liebman M, Schulte LA. 2015.
Impact: 19,518 views/downloads, 12 citations, and Altmetric Score 19 since original publication on February 12, 2015

Avoiding collapse: Grand challenges for science and society to solve by 2050
Barnosky AD, Ehrlich PR, Hadly EA. 2016.
Impact: 16,882 views/downloads, 4 citations, and Altmetric Score 69 since original publication on March 15, 2016

Sustainable Engineering
Editor-in-Chief: Michael E. Chang, Georgia Institute of Technology

4 High-Impact Articles
(All metrics from December 8, 2017. Citation Source: Scopus)

Geoengineering redivivus
Allenby B. 2014.
Impact: 18,297 views/downloads and Altmetric Score 10 since original publication February 12, 2014

Educational materials on sustainable engineering: Do we need a repository?
Davidson CI, Allenby BR, Haselbach LM, Heller M, Kelly WE. 2016.
Impact: 8,257 views/downloads, 3 citations, and Altmetric Score 4 since original publication February 23, 2016

Holistic impact assessment and cost savings of rainwater harvesting at the watershed scale
Ghimire SR, Johnston JM. 2017.
Impact: 322 views/downloads and Altmetric Score 4 since original publication on March 10, 2017

Shipping and the environment: Smokestack emissions, scrubbers and unregulated oceanic consequences
Turner DR, Hassellöv I-M, Ytreberg E, Rutgersson A. 2017.
Impact: 206 views/downloads since original publication on August 11, 2017


5 High-Impact Articles in Atmospheric Science & Ocean Science

To mark the second day of Elementa: Science of the Anthropocene at the American Geophysical Union’s Fall Meeting, we are sharing the 5 most-read articles from Elementa‘s Atmospheric Science and Ocean Science domains. As you’ll see, Elementa articles have high usage, download, impact, and citation metrics (and if you’d like a more sweeping view of the journal’s overall impact, click here). By publishing your research open access in Elementa, your work could also receive high exposure (view submission information here).

For those attending #AGU17, we hope you’ll stop by booth #1820, where Elementa is featured at the DataONE/DataCite booth.


Atmospheric Science
Editor-in-Chief: Detlev Helmig, University of Colorado Boulder

5 High-Impact Articles
(All metrics from December 8, 2017. Citation Source: Scopus)

Global distribution and trends of tropospheric ozone: An observation-based review
Cooper OR, Parrish DD, Ziemke J, Balashov NV, Cupeiro M, et al. 2014.
Impact: 33,419 views/downloads, 94citations, and Altmetric Score 13 since original publication on July 10, 2014

Influence of oil and gas emissions on ambient atmospheric non-methane hydrocarbons in residential areas of Northeastern Colorado
Thompson CR, Hueber J, Helmig D. 2014.
Impact: 24,606 views/downloads, 10 citations (source: CrossRef) and Altmetric Score 14 since original publication on Nov 14, 2014

Anatomy of wintertime ozone associated with oil and natural gas extraction activity in Wyoming and Utah
Oltmans S, Schnell R, Johnson B, Pétron G, Mefford T, Neely III R. 2014.
Impact: 21,352 views/downloads, 16 citations, and Altmetric Score 4 since original publication on March 4, 2014

A characterization of Arctic aerosols on the basis of aerosol optical depth and black carbon measurements
Stone RS, Sharma S, Herber A, Eleftheriadis K, Nelson DW. 2014.
Impact: 19,782 views/downloads, 13 citations, and Altmetric Score 2 since original publication on June 10, 2014

Seasonally varying contributions to urban CO2 in the Chicago, Illinois, USA region: Insights from a high-resolution CO2 concentration and δ13C record
Moore J, Jacobson AD. 2015.
Impact: 19,444 views/downloads, 8 citations, and Altmetric Score 3 since original publication on June 5, 2015

Ocean Science
Editor-in-Chief: Jody Deming, University of Washington

5 High-Impact Articles
(All metrics from December 8, 2017. Citation Source: Scopus)

Evidence of lasting impact of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill on a deep Gulf of Mexico coral community
Hsing P, Fu B, Larcom EA, Berlet SP, Shank TM, et al. 2013.
Impact: 28,269 views/downloads, 21 citations, and Altmetric Score 17 since original publication on December 04, 2013

The evolution and future of carbonate precipitation in marine invertebrates: Witnessing extinction or documenting resilience in the Anthropocene?
Drake JL, Mass T, Falkowski PG. 2014.
Impact: 23,578 views/downloads, 8 citations, and Altmetric Score 7 since original publication on May 7, 2014

Sea ice algal biomass and physiology in the Amundsen Sea, Antarctica
Arrigo KR, Brown ZW, Mills MM. 2014.
Impact: 20,946 views/downloads, 19 citations, and Altmetric Score 4 since original publication on July 15, 2014

The changing Arctic Ocean
Arrigo KR. 2013.
Impact: 20,466 views/downloads, 6 citations, and Altmetric Score 1 since original publication on December 4, 2013

Solar energy capture and transformation in the sea
Karl DM. 2014.
Impact: 20,348 views/downloads, 11 citations, and Altmetric Score 2 since original publication on January 8, 2014


Visit Elementa at the AGU Fall Meeting

Today is the first day of the American Geophysical Union (AGU) Fall Meeting in New Orleans, continuing through December 15, and if you are attending the meeting, you’ll see our open access journal Elementa: Science of the Anthropocene featured at the DataONE/DataCite booth #1820, alongside friends from Dash. We are especially pleased to appear alongside these organizations this year, as Elementa recently announced a partnership with Dash, the data publication platform from the University of California Curation Center (UC3), part of the California Digital Library, which allows Elementa authors to publish their data at UC Press Dash for free. Head over to booth #1820 to learn more about Dash’s data repository service for Elementa authors!

Elementa: Science of the Anthropocene is a trans-disciplinary, open-access journal with the ultimate objective of accelerating scientific solutions to the challenges presented by this era of human impact. Because such solutions will require collaboration among all research disciplines, and among academics, practitioners, and policymakers, the journal’s trans-disciplinary nature is essential. As such, the journal is structured into six distinct knowledge domains, and gives authors the opportunity to publish in one or multiple domains, helping them to present their research and commentary to interested readers from disciplines related to their own.

Elementa’s mission is Open Science for Public Good, and we believe that publishing scientific research that fulfills this mission is more vital than ever. So throughout #AGU17 this week, we’ll be highlighting Elementa’s high usage, download, impact, and citation metrics, sharing the top 5 most-read articles from each of the six domains (stay tuned for the post tomorrow featuring Atmospheric Science and Ocean Science!).

In the meantime, be sure to check out a recent blog post with key article- and journal-level metrics across the whole journal, demonstrating how Elementa’s open, accessible research has a wide reach and impact across a global audience.


Elementa partners with Dash for data publication

Elementa: Science of the Anthropocene is delighted to announce a partnership with Dash, the data publication platform from the University of California Curation Center (UC3), part of the California Digital Library.

Elementa authors can deposit their data in UC Press Dash when they submit to Elementa, free of charge.

This partnership means that Dash now becomes UC Press’ preferred data platform, and Dash will be developing further features to make the data publication experience as seamless as possible for authors. Note that use of Dash is not a requirement—authors are free to utilize another appropriate and stable domain-specific or general repository.

Key features of UC Press Dash include:

  • Each landing page and dataset is optimized for search engines. Inclusion of any relevant geo-location information will take advantage of Dash’s built-in geospatial search.
  • Each landing page facilitates re-use of your data and displays the citable DOI so you can get credit for publishing your research data.
  • Accommodates large file sizes – up to 100GB per submission.
  • Functionality that makes your data open immediately, or, keep your data private during the peer review process, and make it publicly available only if your article is accepted and published. Once your data have been submitted you will receive a citation for your data to include in your Elementa Data Accessibility Statement (which is a required section in published Elementa articles).

For those attending the American Geophysical Union (AGU) Fall meeting in New Orleans, December 11-15, 2017 – stop by the DataCite/DataONE booth, featuring Dash and Elementa: Science of the Anthropocene, to learn more.

For full information on how to use Dash, please visit https://www.elementascience.org/about/data-guidelines

For more technical information about the Dash project, please visit: https://dash.ucpress.edu/stash/about

UC Press Dash will soon be available for additional journals published by UC Press, including Case Studies in the Environment (www.cse.ucpress.edu), and Collabra: Psychology (www.collabra.org).

About Elementa: Science of the Anthropocene
A trans-disciplinary, open access scientific journal, Elementa: Science of the Anthropocene publishes original research with the ultimate objective of accelerating scientific solutions to the challenges presented by this era of human impact.

About UC Press
University of California Press is one of the most forward-thinking scholarly publishers, committed to influencing public discourse and challenging the status quo. At a time of dramatic change for scholarship and publishing, we collaborate with faculty, librarians, authors, and students to stay ahead of today’s knowledge demands and shape the future of publishing.


Elementa: A Brief History

At UC Press, open access—the free, immediate, unrestricted, online access to peer-reviewed research and scholarly work—is central to our mission. In celebration of 2017 International Open Access Week (October 23-29), we are highlighting open access publishing initiatives at UC Press, including our Collabra and Luminos publishing programs. This year’s OA Week theme “Open in order to . . . ” is an invitation to answer the question of what concrete benefits can be realized by making scholarly publications openly available. Follow the full blog series here#OAWeek #OpenInOrderTo

 


Keep up to date on Elementa: Science of the Anthropocene news & updates by signing up for the eNewsletter, and following along on Facebook and Twitter.


ACKNOWLEDGMENT
Elementa: Science of the Anthropocene was founded by BioOne in 2013 through a partnership with five research universities: Dartmouth, the Georgia Institute of Technology, the University of Colorado Boulder, the University of Michigan, and the University of Washington. Please visit our Founders page for the full history.


Open Science for Public Good: Elementa by the Numbers

Elementa: Science of the Anthropocene is an open access, non-profit, interdisciplinary environmental science journal published by UC Press whose mission is Open Science for Public Good. In light of this mission, we’ve highlighted some key article- and journal-level metrics that demonstrate how Elementa‘s open, accessible research has a wide reach and impact across a global audience.

We’d like to especially call attention to the news that Elementa is accepted into the Science Citation Index Expanded and is expected to get an Impact Factor in June 2018, as confirmed by Clarivate Analytics in December 2017. We congratulate and thank all the editors, authors, reviewers, and journal founder, BioOne, who have stewarded the journal into the high-quality publication it is today. (See below for additional citation statistics via Scopus.)


WHAT ELEMENTA PUBLISHES

Atmospheric Science
Editor in Chief: Detlev Helmig
University of Colorado, Boulder, USA

Earth & Environmental Science
Editor in Chief: Oliver A. Chadwick
University of California, Santa Barbara, USA

Ecology
Editor in Chief: Donald A. Zak
University of Michigan, USA

Ocean Science
Editor in Chief: Jody W. Deming
University of Washington, USA

Sustainable Engineering
Editor in Chief: Michael E. Chang
Georgia Institute of Technology, USA

Sustainability Transitions
Editor in Chief: Anne R. Kapuscinski
Dartmouth, USA

Plus two types of special collections:
SPECIAL FEATURES and FORUMS.

ELEMENTA’S GLOBAL AUDIENCE

Top 10 Countries Accessing Elementa:

  1. United States
  2. United Kingdom
  3. Canada
  4. Brazil
  5. Germany
  6. India
  7. Australia
  8. France
  9. China
  10. Italy

 

 

CITATIONS

Elementa was recently included in the Scopus Abstracting and Indexing database, and we can now see how well-cited Elementa articles are. Below is a list of the top 10 most highly cited articles in Elementa, as of December 8, 2017. The full December 8 dataset is available here. (Source: Scopus.)

Additionally, Elementa has been fully accepted into the Science Citation Index Expanded and is expected to get an Impact Factor in June 2018, as confirmed by Clarivate Analytics. We will update this space with Web of Science citation information when available, after June 2018.


Cooper OR, Parrish DD, Ziemke J, Balashov NV, Cupeiro M, Galbally IE, et al.. Global distribution and trends of tropospheric ozone: An observation-based review. Elem Sci Anth. 2014;2:29. DOI: http://doi.org/10.12952/journal.elementa.000029
94 citations

Leaitch WR, Sharma S, Huang L, Toom-Sauntry D, Chivulescu A, Macdonald AM, et al.. Dimethyl sulfide control of the clean summertime Arctic aerosol and cloud. Elem Sci Anth. 2013;1:17. DOI: http://doi.org/10.12952/journal.elementa.000017
31 citations

Ellis EC, Fuller DQ, Kaplan JO, Lutters WG. Dating the Anthropocene: Towards an empirical global history of human transformation of the terrestrial biosphere. Elem Sci Anth. 2013;1:18. DOI: http://doi.org/10.12952/journal.elementa.000018
24 citations

Miller LA, Fripiat F, Else BGT, Bowman JS, Brown KA, Collins RE, et al.. Methods for biogeochemical studies of sea ice: The state of the art, caveats, and recommendations. Elem Sci Anth. 2015;3:38. DOI: http://doi.org/10.12952/journal.elementa.000038
24 citations

Hsing P-Y, Fu B, Larcom EA, Berlet SP, Shank TM, Govindarajan AF, et al.. Evidence of lasting impact of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill on a deep Gulf of Mexico coral community. Elem Sci Anth. 2013;1:12. DOI: http://doi.org/10.12952/journal.elementa.000012
21 citations

Alderkamp A-C, Dijken GL van, Lowry KE, Connelly TL, Lagerström M, Sherrell RM, et al.. Fe availability drives phytoplankton photosynthesis rates during spring bloom in the Amundsen Sea Polynya, Antarctica. Elem Sci Anth. 2015;3:43. DOI: http://doi.org/10.12952/journal.elementa.000043
19 citations

Arrigo KR, Brown ZW, Mills MM. Sea ice algal biomass and physiology in the Amundsen Sea, Antarctica. Elem Sci Anth. 2014;2:28. DOI: http://doi.org/10.12952/journal.elementa.000028
19 citations

Ducklow HW, Wilson SE, Post AF, Stammerjohn SE, Erickson M, Lee S, et al.. Particle flux on the continental shelf in the Amundsen Sea Polynya and Western Antarctic Peninsula. Elem Sci Anth. 2015;3:46. DOI: http://doi.org/10.12952/journal.elementa.000046
18 citations

Cambaliza MOL, Shepson PB, Bogner J, Caulton DR, Stirm B, Sweeney C, et al.. Quantification and source apportionment of the methane emission flux from the city of Indianapolis. Elem Sci Anth. 2015;3:37. DOI: http://doi.org/10.12952/journal.elementa.000037
17 citations

Oltmans S, Schnell R, Johnson B, Pétron G, Mefford T, Neely III R. Anatomy of wintertime ozone associated with oil and natural gas extraction activity in Wyoming and Utah. Elem Sci Anth. 2014;2:24. DOI: http://doi.org/10.12952/journal.elementa.000024
16 citations

 

GROWTH IN WEBSITE USAGE

Steady audience growth with 67% of traffic being new visitors (2017).

Combined reach of 65k on Facebook and 15k on Twitter across Elementa and UC Press social media.

 

GROWTH IN SUBMISSIONS & PUBLISHED ARTICLES

Average total usage is 12,835 views & downloads per article (2013-2017).

Average production time is 20 days from acceptance to publication.

 

 

 

NOTABLE CONTENT

Carrying capacity of U.S. agricultural land: Ten diet scenarios (Peters et al, 2016)
88,880 views/downloads, Altmetric Score: 670

Global distribution and trends of tropospheric ozone: An observation-based review (Cooper et al, 2014)
33,048 views/downloads, 94 citations

Dating the Anthropocene: Towards an empirical global history of human transformation of the terrestrial biosphere (Ellis et al, 2013)
31,924 views/downloads, Altmetric Score: 68

MEDIA HIGHLIGHTS
Elementa articles have been featured in the following media outlets, among others.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


ACKNOWLEDGMENT
Elementa: Science of the Anthropocene was founded by BioOne in 2013 through a partnership with five research universities: Dartmouth, the Georgia Institute of Technology, the University of Colorado Boulder, the University of Michigan, and the University of Washington. Please visit our Founders page for the full history.


UC Press and Open Access: A Brief History

At UC Press, open access—the free, immediate, unrestricted, online access to peer-reviewed research and scholarly work—is central to our mission. In celebration of 2017 International Open Access Week (October 23-29), we are highlighting open access publishing initiatives at UC Press, including our Collabra and Luminos publishing programs. This year’s OA Week theme “Open in order to . . . ” is an invitation to answer the question of what concrete benefits can be realized by making scholarly publications openly available. Follow the full blog series here. #OAWeek #OpenInOrderTo


Libraries: Join UC Press in transforming monograph publishing—become a Luminos Member Library today!

Keep up to date with these publications by subscribing to their respective eNewsletters: Luminos, Collabra: Psychology, and Elementa: Science of the Anthropocene.


ACKNOWLEDGMENT
Elementa: Science of the Anthropocene was founded by BioOne in 2013 through a partnership with five research universities: Dartmouth, the Georgia Institute of Technology, the University of Colorado Boulder, the University of Michigan, and the University of Washington. Please visit our Founders page for the full history.


Open Access at UC Press: A Q&A with Interim Director Erich van Rijn

At UC Press, open access—the free, immediate, unrestricted, online access to peer-reviewed research and scholarly work—is central to our mission. In celebration of 2017 International Open Access Week (October 23-29), we are highlighting open access publishing initiatives at UC Press, including our Collabra and Luminos publishing programs. This year’s OA Week theme “Open in order to . . . ” is an invitation to answer the question of what concrete benefits can be realized by making scholarly publications openly available. Follow the full blog series here. #OAWeek #OpenInOrderTo

In our first post in the series, we sit down with Interim Director Erich van Rijn to survey the landscape of OA publishing at UC Press.


University of California Press’s Interim Director, Erich van Rijn

UC Press made a bold move into OA scholarly monograph publishing two years ago, in summer/fall 2015. How is Luminos progressing in 2017?

EVR: Luminos continues to experience growth. Thus far, we’ve published 40 titles in the program. We tend to count publications by fiscal year, and by that measure, Luminos is entering its third year of publication and every fiscal year has seen an increase in the numbers of titles published, with 14 titles released in the program’s first year and 20 in its second, and projections are for 25 titles to be released in this fiscal year.

We’re also pleased to see continued growth in the Luminos Member Library program, whereby libraries who support OA publishing contribute to the direct costs of publishing monographs in the humanities and social sciences, through annual member fees, so that both the benefits—unfettered global access to important research—and the costs of publishing are shared across stakeholders. We currently have 22 supporting libraries who have contributed $158,000 in funding that has been applied to the production costs of Luminos titles.

With print books, success can be measured in book sales, but how do you measure the success of free open access books?

EVR: One metric we track closely is usage. To date we’ve tallied 84,575+ book and chapter downloads for Luminos titles. That’s an average of well over 2,000 downloads per book. These are impressive numbers, especially when compared against the average sales figures for a traditional print monograph. And in the coming year, we are undertaking a partnership with KU Research, JSTOR, Michigan, UCL Press, and Cornell to evaluate Luminos usage data in order to improve reporting and our understanding of how scholars and other readers are using Luminos books.

How are readers finding Luminos titles? Do you have strategies to improve discoverability?

EVR: In addition to making Luminos titles discoverable at DOAB and available on our own platform, we’re hosting Luminos titles for download on Books at JSTOR and on OAPEN, where additional readers have the opportunity to find these books. We’ve been impressed with the activity we’ve seen for Luminos titles on these sites. Books at JSTOR, in particular, has been influential in bringing a larger audience to these titles—we first made titles available on Books at JSTOR in September 2016 and are now seeing 68% of title downloads coming from Books at JSTOR.

What do we have to look forward to in terms of future Luminos content?

EVR: We have a number of new academic publishing partners who have launched book series with Luminos and some of the first titles in these series will be published in the coming year. This spring will see the publication of inaugural books in the Global Korea series (published in partnership with University of California Berkeley’s Institute for Korean Studies) and in the Islamic Humanities series (published in partnership with the Institute for Islamic Humanities at Brown University). Jinsoo An’s Parameters of Disavowal will look at colonial representation in South Korean cinema, while Shenila Khoja-Moolji will examine the interplay of gender, race, religion and power in transnational contexts in Forging the Ideal Educated Girl. Also coming this spring is Eternal Dissident, in which David Meyers, who edits the UCLA Leve Series in Jewish History and Culture, looks at Leonard Beerman, one of the most controversial Reform rabbis of the twentieth century. We’re excited and pleased to be working with esteemed publishing partners in the Luminos program and look forward to bringing future publications in these and other series to Luminos readers over the coming years.

In addition to Luminos, UC Press also has an open access journal program called Collabra that currently publishes two journals, Collabra: Psychology and Elementa: Science of the Anthropocene. How has the Collabra program progressed in recent years?

EVR: UC Press first entered open access journal publishing in 2015 with the launch of a multidisciplinary mega-journal called Collabra. The plan for Collabra, even as a mega-journal, was to create a journal that puts the academic community first—in transparency and openness, in scientific and scholarly rigor, and in fair pricing and ethical business practices. Our journals program evolved and expanded in 2016 when Collabra transitioned its research focus to psychology as Collabra: Psychology, and when UC Press acquired Elementa: Science of the Anthropocene from BioOne—but our community-first values remain central to our open access program. Both Collabra: Psychology and Elementa have unique business models that share value with editors and reviewers, and give them the option to keep their earnings or pay them forward to the academic community; both journals also include APC waiver funds for authors who cannot pay the APC; and both journals are fully led by their respective academic communities, and are committed to transparency and open science.

How has UC Press worked to innovate and improve the landscape of open access journals publishing?

EVR: In addition to structuring our journals with high levels of integrity, both academically and in business practice, we are delighted to have partnered with the Coko Foundation to develop an open source journal management system—“xpub”. (eLife and Hindawi are additional partners.) Currently the focus is on the submission and review process, and journals, but this project will not be limited to pre-acceptance process, nor journals, in the longer term. Beyond technological innovation, we have also helped make more people accustomed to open peer review, at Collabra: Psychology, whereby review comments are published alongside accepted articles if the authors chose this option. Open peer review can mean many things in the current scholarly publishing landscape, but Collabra: Psychology’s version of it has been more successful and more adopted than we anticipated—fully 77% of article authors have opted for open peer review—so we are pleased to be incrementally changing norms in the service of more transparent science and publishing.

Does UC Press have plans to launch new open access journals in the Collabra program?

EVR: Yes, we are working on a number of OA journal projects, including one called Civic Sociology, which is related to an idea in sociology which is already gaining popularity, about promoting scholarship oriented toward more effective, ethical interventions into systemic social problems, globally, via a better understanding of local and regional particularities. Watch this space for more!


Libraries: Join UC Press in transforming monograph publishing—become a Luminos Member Library today!

Keep up to date with these publications by subscribing to their respective eNewsletters: Luminos, Collabra: Psychology, and Elementa: Science of the Anthropocene.


#ResearchRoundup: 8 New Articles from Elementa: Science of the Anthropocene

In this environmental science #ResearchRoundup, we are pleased to highlight 8 new articles—including select articles trending on Altmetric—published across Elementa: Science of the Anthropocene‘s comprehensive, interdisciplinary Knowledge Domains. All Elementa articles are published #OpenAccess, so be sure to visit us at elementascience.org to read more of the latest articles.

Want more information about Elementa? Join Elementa‘s mailing list and follow the journal on Facebook and Twitter for news and updates.


Atmospheric Science

Regional trend analysis of surface ozone observations from monitoring networks in eastern North America, Europe and East Asia
Kai-Lan Chang,  Irina Petropavlovskikh,  Owen R. Cooper,  Martin G. Schultz,  Tao Wang
07 Sept 2017
Special Feature: Tropospheric Ozone Assessment Report (TOAR): Global metrics for climate change, human health and crop/ecosystem research

Earth & Environmental Science

Biogeochemical characterization of municipal compost to support urban agriculture and limit childhood lead exposure from resuspended urban soils
Maia G. Fitzstevens,  Rosalie M. Sharp,  Daniel J. Brabander
11 Sept 2017

Trending article

Evolving deltas: Coevolution with engineered interventions
A. C. Welch,  R. J. Nicholls,  A. N. Lázár
25 Aug 2017
Special Feature: Deltas in the Anthropocene

 

Ocean Science

Using mineralogy and higher-level taxonomy as indicators of species sensitivity to pH: A case-study of Puget Sound
Shallin Busch,  Paul McElhany
12 Sept 2017
Special Feature: Advances in ocean acidification research

Trending article

Seasonal trends and phenology shifts in sea surface temperature on the North American northeastern continental shelf
Andrew C. Thomas,  Andrew J. Pershing,  Kevin D. Friedland,  Janet A. Nye,  Katherine E. Mills,  Michael A. Alexander,  Nicholas R. Record,  Ryan Weatherbee,  M. Elisabeth Henderson
23 Aug 2017
Special Feature: Climate change impacts: Fish, fisheries and fisheries management

Sustainable Engineering

Shipping and the environment: Smokestack emissions, scrubbers and unregulated oceanic consequences
David R. Turner,  Ida-Maja Hassellöv,  Erik Ytreberg,  Anna Rutgersson
11 Aug 2017
Special Feature: Investigating marine transport processes in the 21st century

Sustainability Transitions

Trending article

Effective inundation of continental United States communities with 21st century sea level rise
12 July 2017
Kristina A. Dahl,  Erika Spanger-Siegfried,  Astrid Caldas,  Shana Udvardy

 

Building student capacity to lead sustainability transitions in the food system through farm-based authentic research modules in sustainability sciences (FARMS)
Selena Ahmed,  Alexandra Sclafani,  Estephanie Aquino,  Shashwat Kala,  Louise Barias, Jaime Eeg
Forum: New Pathways to Sustainability in Agroecological Systems


Elementa: Science of the Anthropocene Call for Papers: Earth & Environmental Science

We invite you to submit your next paper to the Earth & Environmental Science domain of Elementa: Science of the Anthropocene, a trans-disciplinary, open-access journal whose mission is Open Science for the Public Good.

Elementa publishes original research with the ultimate objective of accelerating scientific solutions to the challenges presented by this era of human impact. Structured into six distinct knowledge domains, the Earth & Environmental Science domain encompasses research on processes impacted by humans that occur on the land surface, in groundwater, and in rivers, lakes and coastal areas. This includes, but is not limited to, the traditional sub-disciplines of surficial geology, geomorphology, physical geography, hydrology, glaciology, geochemistry, biogeochemistry, geomicrobiology, limnology, soil science, remote sensing, climate science, and contaminant fate and transport. Studies published in Elementa should relate to processes that have occurred during the Anthropocene epoch (i.e., since the onset of the industrial revolution ~250 years ago) or earlier if they are significantly affected by human activities.

For the full Aims & Scope of the Earth & Environmental Science domain, please click here.

In addition to innovative features including a value-sharing business model and an article-promotion partnership with Kudos, Elementa articles are highly used and downloaded (see highlighted articles below). For the full Elementa story, visit our website at elementascience.org.

For Elementa news and updates, be sure to follow along on Facebook and Twitter.

There has never been a more important time to ensure that transparent, evidence-based, peer-reviewed research has the widest and most impactful dissemination as possible. Please consider submitting your Earth & Environmental Science papers to Elementa or developing a Special Feature or Forum, and feel free to get in touch with Oliver A. Chadwick, University of California, Santa Barbara, Editor in Chief for Earth & Environmental Science, should you have any questions.


Special Features currently open for submissions
Deltas in the Anthropocene

High-impact Earth & Environmental Science content from Elementa: Science of the Anthropocene

(All metrics from May 2, 2017)

Dating the Anthropocene: Towards an empirical global history of human transformation of the terrestrial biosphere
Ellis EC, Fuller DQ, Kaplan JO, Lutters WG
Total usage: 31,617 views/downloads and 7 citations since original publication on December 04, 2013

Seasonally varying contributions to urban CO2 in the Chicago, Illinois, USA region: Insights from a high-resolution CO2 concentration and δ13C record
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