Why is it important to publish in a nonprofit journal?

Elementa’s Associate Editors share their views…

 

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 Atmospheric Science: Paul Palmer

“University-based research is typically a non-profit endeavour, reflecting that it is largely funded by the tax payer. We, the academic community, are becoming more savvy about publishing in open access journals run by non-profit publishers that share our ethos.”

 

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Ecology: Jessica Hellmann

“The fact that Elementa is non-profit helps it achieve the virtues of open access, broad accessibility and high quality. A number of for-profit entities have blazed the trail of open access, but now is the time for a non-profit, community-driven venue that is open access.”

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 Atmospheric Science: Samuel Oltmans

“I think most researchers want to see their work have as broad an impact as possible. This has traditionally meant that for profit publishers like Nature have been venues that carry a particular status. Publications of professional societies like the American Geophysical Union or the American Meteorological Society where I have published are seen as less profit motivated. My hope is that as a nonprofit Elementa will have a particular place among open access journals that will achieve recognition since much of the proliferation of open access publication appears to be associated with for profit publishers.”

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Earth and Environmental Science: John Geissman

“I have never been a fan of huge for-profit publishers of science. Most have taxed the system in a very painful way. The more opportunities scientists have to publish their contributions in nonprofit journals, the better. Elementa provides a very important venue for scholars addressing a range of topics that are important to society, right now.”