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Whitewashing Race The Myth of a Color-Blind Society

List of Contributors
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List of Contributors

Michael Brown is professor and Chair of the Department of Politics at the University of California, Santa Cruz. He is author of Working the Street: Police Discretion and the Dilemmas of Reform (Russell Sage Foundation, 1988), and numerous articles on race, politics, and social policy. His most recent book is Race, Money, and the American Welfare State (Cornell University Press, 1999).

Martin Carnoy is professor of education and economics at Stanford University. Among his books are The State and Political Theory (Princeton University Press, 1984); Education and Work in the Democratic State, with Henry Levin (Stanford University Press, 1985); Faded Dreams: the Economics and Politics of Race in America (Cambridge University Press, 1994); and Sustaining the New Economy: Work, Family and Community in the Information Age (Harvard University Press and Russel Sage, 2000).

Elliott Currie is author of Confronting Crime: An American Challenge (Pantheon, 1985); Reckoning: Drugs, the Cities and the American Future (Hill and Wang, 1993): and Crime and Punishment in America (Metropolitan Books, 1998). He is currently lecturer in legal studies at the University of California, Berkeley, and visiting professor in the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice, Florida State University.

Troy Duster is professor of sociology and senior fellow at the Institute for the History of the Production of Knowledge at New York University. He also holds an appointment as chancellor's professor at the University of California, Berkeley. He is author of The Legislation of Morality (The Free Press, 1970); Cultural Perspectives on Biological Knowledge (Ablex, 1984) with Karen Garrett; and numerous articles on youth unemployment and postindustrialism, diversity, and higher education. His most recent book is Backdoor to Eugenics (Routledge, 1990).

David B. Oppenheimer is professor of law and associate dean for academic affairs at Golden Gate University. He has contributed articles on discrimination law and affirmative action to the University of Pennsylvania Law Review, the Cornell Law Review, the Columbia Human Rights Law Review, the Berkeley Journal of Employment and Labor Law, the Berkeley Women's Law Journal, the UC Davis Law Review, the Hastings Constitutional Law Quarterly, and numerous other law journals.

Marjorie M. Shultz is professor of law at Boalt Hall School of Law, University of California, Berkeley. She is the author of numerous articles on race, gender, family issues, and health care. Her articles have appeared in the Yale Law Journal, and the California, Wisconsin, Stanford, and Iowa Law reviews, as well as in medical and scientific anthologies and journals.

David Wellman is professor of community studies at the University of California, Santa Cruz, and research sociologist at the Institute for the Study of Social Change at the University of California, Berkeley. He has written extensively on race and racism in American society. He is the author of Portraits of White Racism (Cambridge University Press, 1977); a second edition was published in 1993. His most recent book is The Union Makes Us Strong (Cambridge University Press, 1997).