Opportunities to Connect with Feminist Media Histories at #SCMS18

With the annual meeting of the Society of Cinema and Media Studies happening this week in Toronto, conference attendees are invited to connect with Feminist Media Histories at the following in-person events, and at @FemMediaHist and Facebook for free article downloads throughout the conference.

SCMS Women’s Caucus Graduate Student Writing Prize

Don’t miss the announcement of this year’s prize winner at the SCMS Women’s Caucus meeting on Thursday, March 15 at 4:00-5:45pm (Simcoe/Dufferin).

In recent years, Feminist Media Histories has been delighted to partner with the SCMS Women’s Caucus to co-sponsor the SCMS Women’s Caucus Graduate Student Writing Prize, an award that recognizes outstanding scholarship in feminist media history.

We’re celebrating the presentation of the award by offering free access to the winning article of the 2016 Writing Prize:

“Television’s ‘Mr. Moms’: Idealizing the New Man in 1980s Domestic Sitcoms”
Bridget Kies, University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee


Meet the Editor: Shelley Stamp (University of California, Santa Cruz)

Visit FMH Editor Shelley Stamp at the UC Press booth on Friday, March 16 from 10:00-11:00am to discuss publishing your work in the journal.

Whether or not you are attending #SCMS18, follow FMH on Twitter (FemMediaHist) and Facebook for news about ongoing free article downloads. In particular, FMH is celebrating Women’s History Month and #SCMS18 by freeing one FMH article for 48 hours every Tuesday and Thursday throughout the month of Month. Follow along to catch free downloads during #SCMS18 and beyond!

UC Press at SCMS in Toronto

We are looking forward to the annual conference for the Society of Cinema and Media Studies, convening this week in Toronto.

Visit Our Booth

Browse new titles and save 40% online with discount code 17E3831, or request an exam copy for consideration to use in your upcoming classes.

Film Quarterly is celebrating its 60th anniversary this year. Come pick up a copy of the journal’s new March issue, the first issue for the 2018 anniversary year.

Meet Our Editors

Raina Polivka, Acquisitions Editor for our Cinema and Media Studies lists, will be in the booth daily (Thursday, March 15–Saturday, March 17) from 4–5 pm.

Shelley Stamp, Editor for both the Feminist Media Histories journal and Feminist Media Histories book series, will be in the booth on Friday, March 16 from 10–11am.

The Feminist Media Histories book series publishes feminist histories of film, radio, television, video, playable media and digital culture across a range of periods and global contexts. Inter-medial and trans-national in its approach, the series features historical scholarship on an array of 19th-, 20th- and 21st-century media, examining the historical roles gender and sexuality have played in film, video, audio, and digital technologies, while documenting the engagement of women and LGBTQ communities with these media as audiences and consumers, as creators and executives, as critics, writers and theorists, as technicians and laborers, and as educators, activists and librarians.

Ruby Rich, Editor for Film Quarterly, will be in the booth on Thursday, March 15 from 3–4 pm, and Regina Longo, Associate Editor for Film Quarterly, will be in the booth on Friday, March 16 from 2–4 pm.

Jean Ma, Series Co-Editor (with Jim Buhler) for California Studies in Music, Sound, and Media will be at the conference actively seeking proposals.

The California Studies in Music, Sound, and Media series offers scholarship on music and sound in film, television, games, music video, advertising, radio, and new media, in order to promote innovative approaches to the theory and history of media. The aim of the series is to take music and sound as a springboard for rethinking key concepts in media studies, for forging connections across media and disciplines, and for building a global, context-specific knowledge of media history. Topics include studies of the integrated soundtrack; audio-visual poetics; industries and practices of music and sound; technologies of sound reproduction and representation; histories and phenomenologies of listening; and voice, corporeality, and affect.

Richard Abel, Giorgio Bertellini, and Matthew Solomon are Series Editors for a brand new book series, Cinema Cultures in Contact. Giorgio Bertellini will be in Toronto.

The Cinema Cultures in Contact series publishes single- or co-authored books that examine cinematic exchanges across borders through rigorous, original studies of specific instances of movement, transaction, translation, displacement, exchange, encroachment, and/or other modes of “contact” between cinemas in two or more national contexts. Books in the series are engaged with primary sources and current scholarly discourse in at least two different languages. Proposals to the series should be transnationally oriented not only in terms of subject matter, but also in terms of methodologies, references, evidence, and argumentative scope.

The series’ advisory board includes Nilo Couret (University of Michigan); Manishita Dass (Royal Holloway, University of London, UK); Kay Dickinson (Concordia University, Canada); Frieda Ekotto (University of Michigan); Aniko Imre (USC); Rielle Navitski (University of Georgia); Markus Nornes (University of Michigan); Masha Salazkina (Concordia University, Canada); Laura Isabel Serna (USC); Johannes von Moltke (University of Michigan); and Zhen Zhang (NYU).

Watch this space for more SCMS-related news throughout the week.

Feminist Media Histories Celebrates Women’s History Month 2018

To celebrate Women’s History Month, Feminist Media Histories will be highlighting articles from past issues, all of which document rich histories of women’s engagement with a range of media across diverse global contexts in key historical moments. Each Tuesday and Thursday throughout the month of March one FMH article will be free to download for 48 hours.

We begin with Annie Fee’s article on “les midinettes révoluntionnaires,” activist, working-class young women in 1920s Paris who were also avid cinema-goers. Other articles featured this month will trace modern womanhood in Egyptian melodrama, female stand-up comedy on 1960 and 70s TV, Italian antifascist filmmaker Cecilia Mangini, pinup photographer Bunny Yeager, women’s labor in the Japanese anime industry, and much more.

Featured articles highlight the range of special issues published by FMH, including recent issues on Labor, Comedy, Data, and Middle Eastern Media.

Follow Feminist Media Histories on Facebook and Twitter to catch every free download this month. And watch for future special issues devoted to Comics, Asian Media, Transnational Broadcasting, and Adult Media.

—Shelley Stamp, Editor of Feminist Media Histories, UC Santa Cruz

Extraordinary Histories

An opportunity to reflect on the numerous events and figures in American history, Black History Month is more than a month; it is an expansive and growing history of America. The recommended books below highlight poignant historical moments and social movements and exemplary leaders at the front of societal change. Just a sample of the breadth of titles we publish in African American history, and on ethnic studies, more broadly, these titles foster greater understanding of national and world history.

Black against Empire: The History and Politics of the Black Panther Party
By Joshua Bloom and Waldo E. Martin Jr.

In Oakland, California, in 1966, community college students Bobby Seale and Huey Newton armed themselves, began patrolling the police, and promised to prevent police brutality. Unlike the Civil Rights Movement that called for full citizenship rights for blacks within the United States, the Black Panther Party rejected the legitimacy of the U.S. government and positioned itself as part of a global struggle against American imperialism. In the face of intense repression, the Party flourished, becoming the center of a revolutionary movement with offices in sixty-eight U.S. cities and powerful allies around the world. The notions of self-reliance and self-determination were at the core of the Panther’s beliefs, but the Party’s legacy has been largely misunderstood.

With Black Against Empire, historian Waldo E. Martin and sociologist Joshua Bloom provide the most comprehensive, unvarnished examination of the Party and its place in the larger scope of revolutionary and political tides swirling in the tumultuous 1960s. A book Bobby Seale called “profoundly important,” this bold, engrossing, and richly detailed history cuts through the mythology to reveal the political dynamics that drove the explosive growth of this revolutionary movement.

Selected as San Francisco’s 2017 One City One Book.

Houston Bound: Culture and Color in a Jim Crow City
By Tyina L. Steptoe

Beginning after World War I, the city of Houston was transformed from a black-and-white frontier town into one of the most ethnically and racially diverse urban areas in the United States. Tyina L. Steptoe’s award-winning Houston Bound draws on social and cultural history to show how, despite Anglo attempts to fix racial categories through Jim Crow laws, converging migrations—particularly those of Mexicans and Creoles—complicated ideas of blackness and whiteness and introduced different understandings about race. This migration history also examines these racial complexities through music and sound to trace the emergence of Houston’s blues and jazz scenes in the 1920s as well as the hybrid forms of these genres that arose when migrants forged shared social space and carved out new communities and politics.

Winner of the Urban History Association’s 2016 Kenneth Jackson Award, the Western History Association’s 2017 W. Turrentine-Jackson Award, and the Friends of the Texas Room’s 2017 Julia Ideson Award.

Chocolate Cities: The Black Map of American Life
By Marcus Anthony Hunter and Zandria Robinson

When you think of a map of the United States, what do you see? Now think of the Seattle that begot Jimi Hendrix. The Dallas that shaped Erykah Badu. The Holly Springs, Mississippi, that compelled Ida B. Wells to activism against lynching. The Birmingham where Martin Luther King, Jr., penned his most famous missive. Now how do you see the United States?

Chocolate Cities offers a new cartography of the United States—a “Black Map” that more accurately reflects the lived experiences and the future of Black life in America. Drawing on cultural sources such as film, music, fiction, and plays, and on traditional resources like Census data, oral histories, ethnographies, and health and wealth data, the book offers a new perspective for analyzing, mapping, and understanding the ebbs and flows of the Black American experience—all in the cities, towns, neighborhoods, and communities that Black Americans have created and defended. Black maps are consequentially different from our current geographical understanding of race and place in America. And as the United States moves toward a majority minority society, Chocolate Cities provides a broad and necessary assessment of how racial and ethnic minorities make and change America’s social, economic, and political landscape.

Charles Burnett: A Cinema of Symbolic Knowledge
By James Naremore

Considered by the Chicago Tribune as “one of America’s very best filmmakers” and by The New York Times as “the nation’s least-known great filmmaker and most gifted black director,” Charles Burnett is a crucial figure in the history of American cinema and often regarded as the most influential member of the L.A. Rebellion group of African American filmmakers. The first book devoted to Burnett, James Naremore provides a close critical study of all Burnett’s major pictures for movies and television, including Killer of SheepTo Sleep with AngerThe Glass ShieldNightjohnThe WeddingNat Turner: A Troublesome Property, and Warming by the Devil’s Fire. Having accessed new information and rarely seen material, Naremore shows that Burnett’s career has developed against the odds and that his artistry, social criticism, humor, and commitment to what he calls “symbolic knowledge” have given his work enduring value for American culture.

Holy Hip Hop in the City of Angels
By Christina Zanfagna

In the 1990s, Los Angeles was home to numerous radical social and environmental eruptions. In the face of several major earthquakes and floods, riots and economic insecurity, policebrutality and mass incarceration, some young black Angelenos turned to holy hip hop—a movement merging Christianity and hip hop culture—to “save” themselves and the city. Converting street corners to open-air churches and gangsta rap beats into anthems of praise, holy hip hoppers used gospel rap to navigate complicated social and spiritual realities and to transform the Southland’s fractured terrains into musical Zions. Armed with beats, rhymes, and bibles, they journeyed through black Lutheran congregations, prison ministries, African churches, reggae dancehalls, hip hop clubs, Nation of Islam meetings, and Black Lives Matter marches. Zanfagna’s fascinating ethnography provides a contemporary and unique view of black LA, offering a much-needed perspective on how music and religion intertwine in people’s everyday experiences.

The Chosen Ones: Black Men and the Politics of Redemption
By Nikki Jones 

In The Chosen Ones, sociologist and feminist scholar Nikki Jones shares the compelling story of a group of Black men living in San Francisco’s historically Black neighborhood, the Fillmore. Against all odds, these men work to atone for past crimes by reaching out to other Black men, young and old, with the hope of guiding them toward a better life. Yet despite their genuine efforts, they struggle to find a new place in their old neighborhood. With a poignant yet hopeful voice, Jones illustrates how neighborhood politics, everyday interactions with the police, and conservative Black gender ideologies shape the men’s ability to make good and forgive themselves—and how the double-edged sword of community shapes the work of redemption.

Forthcoming June 2018; preorder today.

Making All Black Lives Matter: Reimagining Freedom in the 21st Century
By Barbara Ransby 

In the wake of the murder of unarmed teenager Trayvon Martin in 2012 and the exoneration of his killer, three black women activists launched a hashtag and social-media platform, Black Lives Matter, which would become the rubric for a larger movement. To many, especially those in the media, Black Lives Matter appeared to burst onto the national political landscape out of thin air.

But as historian and esteemed activist Barbara Ransby shows in her highly-anticipated Making All Black Lives Matter, the movement has roots in prison abolition, anti-police violence, black youth movements, and radical mobilizations across the country dating back at least a decade. Ransby interviewed more than a dozen of the movements principal organizers and activists, and she provides a detailed review of its extensive coverage in mainstream and social media. A critical history of the present, Making All Black Lives Matter offers one of the first overviews of Black Lives Matter and explores the challenges and possible future for this growing and influential movement.

Forthcoming September 2018; preorder today.

UC Press titles awarded CHOICE’s Outstanding Academic Title for 2017

We are pleased to announce that five of our titles have been awarded Outstanding Academic Title for 2017 by CHOICE!

This selective list, announced in every year’s January issue, consists of only about ten percent of the 6,000 works reviewed by CHOICE during the previous calendar year. It is a reflection of the best scholarly titles reviewed by CHOICE, chosen based upon the following criteria:

  • overall excellence in presentation and scholarship
  • importance relative to other literature in the field
  • distinction as a first treatment of a given subject in book or electronic form
  • originality or uniqueness of treatment
  • value to undergraduate students
  • importance in building undergraduate library collections

We’re proudly displaying these winning titles in our Oakland offices. Check out our CHOICE shelf, and each individual title, below.


Hymns for the Fallen:
Combat Movie Music and Sound after Vietnam
by Todd Decker

“Marked on every page by clear logic, sensitive perception, and emotional commitment, this is a welcome and original study.”





Islamic Civilization in Thirty Lives:
The First 1,000 Years
by Chase F. Robinson

“Robinson delivers a fascinating snapshot of Islamic history through 30 brief biographies. By including a mixture of the usual suspects (Muhammad, Ali, Saladin) and the unexpected (Ibn Hazm, Ibn Muqla, Abu al-Qasim), the author offers readers a rich variety of lives in pre-Islamic history.”



The Curious Humanist:
Siegfried Kracauer in America

by Johannes Von Moltke

“Clearly written, accessible to a wide readership, and including a comprehensive bibliography, this book provides an excellent overview of Kracauer’s thought and contributions to the development of humanistic inquiry.”




The Real School Safety Problem:
The Long-Term Consequences of Harsh School Punishment

by Aaron Kupchik

A must-read book that focuses on the real problem in school safety–the over-reliance on punishment, and the under-reliance on problem-solving and caring.”
—Russell J. Skiba, Director, Equity Project, Indiana University Center for Evaluation and Education Policy




The Uses of Photography:
Art, Politics, and the Reinvention of a Medium
Edited by Jill Dawsey 

“This is a valuable introduction to the work of these individuals and, beyond that, a reasoned assessment of the nature and qualities of this aspect of an important art movement. . . Summing Up: Highly recommended.”


Herstory: Feminist Theory and Resistance in Art & Cinema

This weekend marks the one year anniversary of the largest single day protest in US history—the Women’s March—when on January 21, 2017, 4.2 million people marched across the US in more than 600 US cities, and from Antarctica to Zimbabwe, at least 261 more sister marches cropped up worldwide. To celebrate this pivotal protest, UC Press is highlighting titles across subjects as part of our Herstory series, with today’s focus on Feminist Theory and Resistance in Art & Cinema. While just a preview of our publishing “herstory,” these titles will engage your intellect and inspire your activism today, tomorrow, and for future tomorrows.

Agnès Varda between Film, Photography, and Art by Rebecca J. DeRoo

The only female director of the French New Wave, Agnès Varda was one of four honorary Oscar winners in 2017 (again, the only woman.) With a cinematic career spanning more than six decades, Varda has experimented with all forms of filmmaking and is not only a prolific director but an accomplished photographer and artist. Her films, photographs, and art installations all focus on feminist issues and social commentary with a distinctive nonconventional and experimental style. Rebecca J. DeRoo demonstrates how Varda draws upon the histories of art, photography, and film to complicate the overt narratives in her works and to advance contemporary cultural politics.

Radical Eroticism: Women, Art, and Sex in the 1960s by Rachel Middleman

Radical Eroticism examines the importance of women’s contributions during the 1960s in fundamentally reconfiguring representations of sexuality across several areas of advanced art—performance, pop, postminimalism, and beyond. Rachel Middleman shows that erotic art made by women was integral to the profound changes that took place in American art during the sixties, from the crumbling of modernist aesthetics and the expanding field of art practice to the emergence of the feminist art movement.


Lois Weber in Early Hollywood by Shelley Stamp

Among early Hollywood’s most renowned filmmakers, Lois Weber was considered one of the era’s “three great minds” alongside D. W. Griffith and Cecil B. DeMille. Weber made films on capital punishment, contraception, poverty, and addiction, and her work grappled with the profound changes in women’s lives that unsettled Americans at the beginning of the twentieth century. Mentor to many women in the industry, Weber demanded a place at the table in early professional guilds, decrying the limited roles available for women on-screen and in the 1920s protesting the growing climate of hostility toward female directors. Stamp demonstrates how female filmmakers who had played a part in early Hollywood’s bid for respectability were in the end written out of that industry’s history.

Consuming Stories: Kara Walker and the Imagining of American Race by Rebecca Peabody

In Consuming Stories, Rebecca Peabody explores a significant yet neglected aspect of Walker’s production: her commitment to examining narrative depictions of race, gender, power, and desire. These stories, Peabody reminds us, not only change the way people remember history but also shape the entertainment industry. Consuming Stories shifts the critical conversation away from the visual legacy of historical racism toward the present-day role of the entertainment industry—and its consumers—in processes of radicalization.


Best of the Blog 2017

As 2017 draws to a close, we’ve compiled ten blog posts that resonated most with our readers over the past year. Popular blog themes closely mirrored current events, and the state of global political realities — immigration, inequality, fascism, and environmental issues; additionally, readers were taken by posts on critical thinking, “slow” cinema, indigenous and world poetry, and the secrets unearthed from an ancient metropolis.

Have a happy new year, and see you in 2018, the 125th year of UC Press’s founding!

Immigration historians from across the United States launched the website #ImmigrationSyllabus to help the public understand the historical roots of today’s immigration debates, inspiring us to follow suit with a list of UC Press suggestions to provide further context to the ongoing conversation. View the Immigration Syllabus: UC Press Edition.

Raj Patel & Jason W. Moore’s A History of the World in Seven Cheap Things focuses on seven areas that are the foundation of modern commerce: nature, money, work, care, food, energy, and lives. In this excerpt, find out how the cheapening of care has made the world safe for capitalism: #7CheapThings: Cheap Care

In Trump’s Transgender Crisis, Jack Halberstam, author of Trans*: A Quick and Quirky Account of Gender Variability, responds to Donald Trump’s tweeted policy change banning trans soldiers from the military to ask: at a time when the visibility and acceptance of transgender people has never been higher, why this ban, why now?

In today’s fast-paced political news cycle, terms like “fascism” and “populism” are often used, but not always clearly defined. This excerpt from Federico Finchelstein’s From Fascism to Populism in History, explores the origins of these ideologies, their significance, and the important distinctions between them: Fascism or Populism? Playing the “Democratic Game”

One of the earliest, largest, and most important cities in the ancient Americas, Teotihuacan is now a UNESCO World Heritage Site and the most visited archaeological site in Mexico. Take a Look at Teotihuacan to see some of the rare and awe-inspiring artifacts featured in the exhibition and accompanying catalogue Teotihuacan: City of Water, City of Fire.


Fifty years since its original publication, Jerome Rothenberg’s Technicians of the Sacred continues to inspire and educate readers with its ability to expand the possibilities of poetry throughout the world. Rothenberg recently visited the UC Press offices to discuss the book’s enduring power and read from the 50th anniversary edition.



Peter M. Nardi, sociologist and author of Critical Thinking: Tools for Evaluating Research, addressed the importance of looking beyond the “two-sides-of-the-coin” perspective when responding to complex issues in his post False Balance, Binary Discourse, and Critical Thinking.

Releasing in May 2018, Paul Schrader’s seminal text Transcendental Style in Film: Ozu, Bresson, Dreyer will be reissued with a substantial new introduction representing his experiences and ideas as a filmmaker that have evolved over time, giving the original work both new clarity and a contemporary lens. Hear Schrader discuss some of the techniques and attitudes of slow films in Transcendental Style in Film Revisited.

During the 2017 International Open Access Week, we interviewed Interim Director Erich van Rijn to survey the landscape of OA publishing at UC Press, discussing the progress and future of Luminos (our OA monograph program), and Collabra: Psychology and Elementa: Science of the Anthropocene (our two OA journals).

What is a case study, and how can case studies positively impact critical thinking and knowledge acquisition, as well as inform research in academia and training in professional practice? In the post The Case for Case StudiesCase Studies in the Environment Editor-in-Chief Wil Burns explains what case studies are, and how they can provide an important bridge to understanding important environmental issues.

A Virtual Film Quarterly Reader

To introduce the membership of the American Studies Association to the oldest U.S. film journal in continual publication (next year marks its sixtieth anniversary), the editors of Film Quarterly have chosen a selection of recent articles to introduce the journal to you and demonstrate its relevance to your studies, thinking, and curricula. These are essays on film, episodic television, and museum installation work that are deeply concerned with questions of representation as well as its relevance to social justice, gender and sexuality studies, aesthetic strategies, industrial histories, cultural studies, and the place of popular culture in personal, national, and transnational memory. We are making these essays available to you without a subscription for a limited time.

If you enjoy this selection, please consider subscribing yourself and getting your institution to subscribe, either to the digital or paper (which includes digital) edition. ASA members are invited to save 20% off the individual subscription rate by using discount code FQASA at checkout.

Film Quarterly is published quarterly and is a peer-reviewed journal which also solicits essays, publishes targeted dossiers, covers film festivals, and reviews the most important books published in the field.

Please click on the articles below or access the virtual reader on Film Quarterly’s site.

A Sense of Place: Paz Encina’s Radical Poetics
Natalia Brizuela

Baldwin’s Rendezvous with the Twenty-First Century: I Am Not Your Negro
Warren Crichlow

Cosmologies of Black Cultural Production: A Conversation with African Surrealist Filmmaker Christopher Harris
Terri Francis

Subverting Hollywood from the Inside Out: Melvin Van Peebles’s Watermelon Man
Racquel Gates

Wave After Wave After Wave: The Multi-Channel Immersion of Isaac Julien’s Ten Thousand Waves
Joseph Livesy

Of Stars and Solitude: Two Mexican Documentaries
Paul Julian Smith

The Original Brexit: Rediscovering The Jewel in the Crown
Bilal Qureshi

Jewish, Queer-ish, Trans, and Completely Revolutionary: Jill Soloway’s Transparent and the New Television
Amy Villarejo

Sketchy Lesbians: Carol as History and Fantasy
Patricia White

Save 40% on New & Notable German Studies Titles

The 2017 German Studies Association Conference convenes October 5 – 8 in Atlanta, GA.

Visit our landing page to browse new and forthcoming UC Press titles across various disciplines, including Cinema & Media Studies, Music, Art & Visual Culture, and History. Save 40% online with discount code 16E8104, or request an exam copy for consideration to use in your upcoming classes. The discount code expires December 31, 2017.


On Agnès Varda, Winner of 2017 Honorary Oscar Award

by Rebecca J. DeRoo, author of Agnès Varda between Film, Photography and Art

French film director Agnès Varda will receive an honorary Oscar this November from the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. Which aspects of Varda’s career will the Academy celebrate? Her formidable directorial career spans from writing and directing her first film at age 25 to releasing her most recent film Faces, Places at age 89. Historically, critics have praised Varda as the innovative “mother” of the French New Wave film movement, with her first film, La Pointe Courte (1954), a precursor to the movement and Cleo from 5 to 7 (1961) made at the height of the New Wave. This identity has long overshadowed other parts of her career.

Cover image for Agnès Varda book
Available October 2017

More recently, scholars have recognized her as an essential feminist filmmaker. At the same time, Varda has continued to create new work, making films as well as multimedia art over the last two decades. And the Academy has the opportunity to celebrate Varda’s past and present work as even more innovative. Agnès Varda between Film, Photography, and Art shows that before Varda pursued cinema, she studied art history and practiced photography, and across her career, she has quietly yet subversively woven references to histories of art, photography, and film throughout her oeuvre. These references open out beyond the surface narrative of her work and engage contemporary cultural politics. This honorary Oscar recognizes Varda’s immense directorial accomplishments. But an interdisciplinary reading enables us to better appreciate the multidimensionality of Varda’s cinema and her career as both filmmaker and artist.

Art and cinema historian Rebecca J. DeRoo is an assistant professor at the Rochester Institute of Technology and co-curated the 2016 retrospective Agnès Varda: (Self)-Portraits, Facts and Fiction, at the George Eastman Museum.