University of California Press and Institute for Studies on Latin American Art to Partner on Latin American Art Book Series

University of California Press is pleased to announce a new book series, Studies on Latin American Art, developed though a major gift from the Institute for Studies on Latin American Art (ISLAA).

Through insightful texts and images, books in the series—the first of its kind to be published by an academic press—will explore the history, importance, and global and regional influence of Latin American art in the 20th and 21st centuries. International and cosmopolitan in scope, the series seeks to address the production, exhibition, and dissemination of art in and between countries and continents, present and analyze innovative research concerning intellectual content-making in Central and South America, and broaden the public for exciting new scholarship on the area. Titles in English, as well as translations of exceptional studies by Central and South American scholars, will be featured. Topics include art history, exhibition history, investigations of the relation between the art and social context of specific nations, comparative analyses of different cultural traditions and milieus, in-depth monographic examinations of important artists or artistic collectives, and interdisciplinary works that bridge the fields of art history, media studies, architecture, literature, film, anthropology, and cultural criticism.

“We are looking forward to continuing our longtime celebration of Latin American art in all its diversity and impact through this new book series,” says UC Press Executive Director Tim Sullivan. “We are particularly delighted to be joining forces with the Institute for Studies on Latin American Art, and are extremely grateful for its generous contribution that will help to make this major publishing initiative possible.”

ISLAA President and Founder Ariel Aisiks is similarly enthusiastic about the book series: “For many years, ISLAA has championed the investigation and promotion of cutting-edge scholarship on Latin American art. I am certain that this exciting partnership with UC Press will further ISLAA’s mission, and increase awareness and appreciation of groundbreaking Latin American art among readers far and wide.”

UC Press art history editor Nadine Little will lead the project and work closely with chief series editor Alexander Alberro, Virginia Bloedel Wright Professor of Art History and Department Chair at Barnard College and the author of numerous books including Abstraction in Reverse: The Reconfigured Spectator in Mid-Twentieth Century Latin American Art (University of Chicago Press). As Alberro states, “Thanks to the enlightened support of the Institute for Studies on Latin American Art (ISLAA) and the initiative and foresight of the University of California Press, the new book series is positioned to make an enormous scholarly contribution to the study of Latin American art.”

The first title in the Studies on Latin American Art series is anticipated to publish in Spring 2019.

About the Institute for Studies on Latin American Art
The Institute for Studies on Latin American Art (ISLAA) is an initiative of the Geo Global Foundation devoted to the support of advanced research in the field of Latin American art studies. ISLAA plays an international role in fostering and promoting Latin American art research through distinguished grants, partnerships, and support of lectures, conferences, and publications. ISLAA is dedicated to advancing and nurturing Latin American art research and developing international networks for the exchange of ideas and resources. ISLAA concentrates on long-term capacity building strategies and programs that support future generations of scholars, art historians, and museum professionals.

Destination LA: College Art Association 2018

The College Art Association annual conference is taking place on the West Coast this year, convening in Los Angeles next week.

We welcome attendees to our home state, and look forward to connecting at the conference.

Visit Us at Booth #307

Save 40% on new and notable Art titles. Request an exam copy of books designed for course use, such as these two new texts on the Art Market. Sign up for our Art eNews list in the booth to be automatically entered in our daily conference prize drawing for the book of your choice.

Attend Our Session

University of California Press invites you to our exhibitor session: Creative Art Book Promotion and How to Find Audiences That Matter on Friday, February 23rd, 8:30AM–10:00AM. The panel will be chaired by UC Press’s Senior Marketing Manager, Aimée Goggins, with Tyler Green, historian and producer/host of The Modern Art Notes Podcast; Anastasia Aukeman, Parsons School of Design; Maureen Winter, Getty Publications; and Kate Koza, Bookforum as panelists.

Attend Our Session at College Art Association

For the first time ever, conference exhibitors were invited to submit panel proposals for the 2018 College Art Association Annual Conference in Los Angeles.

The CAA Annual Conference is the largest gathering of professionals in the visual arts in the world, with over 300 panels and dozens of professional development workshops and events. The College Art Association encourages anyone who is interested in the arts, works in the arts, is looking for a job in the arts, or works in higher education to try to attend the conference.* The last time it was in Los Angeles was 2012. It’s not quite Halley’s Comet, but it’s not too far off either.

We are thrilled to have our session on the program for Friday morning, February 23rd—please plan your conference schedule so that you can join us!


Friday, February 23rd


Room 511A

This moderator-led panel will bring together a variety of art world and publishing industry experts to discuss perspectives on promoting your book beyond the academy. Our team of panelists include:

Tyler Green is an historian and an award-winning critic who has produced and hosted The Modern Art Notes Podcast since 2011. The MAN Podcast is a weekly, hour-long interview program featuring artists, historians, authors, curators and conservators, that the BBC named one of the world’s top 25 cultural podcasts that would “blow your mind,” and “enrich your life”. His forthcoming book, Carleton Watkins: Making the West American, will be published by University of California Press in 2018.

Anastasia Aukeman is an art historian and curator who teaches at Parsons School of Design in New York City. Her book Welcome to Painterland: Bruce Conner and the Rat Bastard Protective Association was published in 2016 (UC Press), coinciding with the BRUCE CONNER retrospective at MoMA and SFMOMA. Anastasia curated related exhibitions at the Landing Gallery in Los Angeles and the Susan Inglett Gallery in New York City.

Maureen Winter is Associate Publisher at Getty Publications and directs the Sales and Marketing department. This role gives her practical insight into what resonates in the market and how authors can successfully work with their publishers. Prior to joining the Getty Maureen spent 12 years in sales, marketing & rights at the illustrated trade publisher, Black Dog & Leventhal.

Kate Koza is Associate Publisher of Bookforum and the Director of Strategic Communication for Artforum. In these roles, Kate establishes and manages partnerships with cultural organizations and literary venues, facilitating a wide variety of private and public events, and oversees advertising opportunities for trade, university, and art-book publishers. She curates content for Bookforum’s digital channels, guides long-term planning and strategy, and generally helps support an ecosystem of engaged arts and culture enthusiasts.

Aimée Goggins, Senior Marketing Manager at University of California Press will chair the panel, and topics will include how to pitch your work to non-specialists, partnering with your publisher to ensure your success, positioning yourself for interviews and speaking engagements, tips for connecting your work to contemporary culture and dialogue, how and when to think about the different audiences for your book, supporting a book release outside the traditional author talk, and the panelists will share their own relevant experiences and stories.

Come ready to learn, to share your ideas and questions, and to expand your views on art publishing today.

*Advance registration for the conference ends on February 7. Review the full schedule.

Herstory: Feminist Theory and Resistance in Art & Cinema

This weekend marks the one year anniversary of the largest single day protest in US history—the Women’s March—when on January 21, 2017, 4.2 million people marched across the US in more than 600 US cities, and from Antarctica to Zimbabwe, at least 261 more sister marches cropped up worldwide. To celebrate this pivotal protest, UC Press is highlighting titles across subjects as part of our Herstory series, with today’s focus on Feminist Theory and Resistance in Art & Cinema. While just a preview of our publishing “herstory,” these titles will engage your intellect and inspire your activism today, tomorrow, and for future tomorrows.

Agnès Varda between Film, Photography, and Art by Rebecca J. DeRoo

The only female director of the French New Wave, Agnès Varda was one of four honorary Oscar winners in 2017 (again, the only woman.) With a cinematic career spanning more than six decades, Varda has experimented with all forms of filmmaking and is not only a prolific director but an accomplished photographer and artist. Her films, photographs, and art installations all focus on feminist issues and social commentary with a distinctive nonconventional and experimental style. Rebecca J. DeRoo demonstrates how Varda draws upon the histories of art, photography, and film to complicate the overt narratives in her works and to advance contemporary cultural politics.

Radical Eroticism: Women, Art, and Sex in the 1960s by Rachel Middleman

Radical Eroticism examines the importance of women’s contributions during the 1960s in fundamentally reconfiguring representations of sexuality across several areas of advanced art—performance, pop, postminimalism, and beyond. Rachel Middleman shows that erotic art made by women was integral to the profound changes that took place in American art during the sixties, from the crumbling of modernist aesthetics and the expanding field of art practice to the emergence of the feminist art movement.


Lois Weber in Early Hollywood by Shelley Stamp

Among early Hollywood’s most renowned filmmakers, Lois Weber was considered one of the era’s “three great minds” alongside D. W. Griffith and Cecil B. DeMille. Weber made films on capital punishment, contraception, poverty, and addiction, and her work grappled with the profound changes in women’s lives that unsettled Americans at the beginning of the twentieth century. Mentor to many women in the industry, Weber demanded a place at the table in early professional guilds, decrying the limited roles available for women on-screen and in the 1920s protesting the growing climate of hostility toward female directors. Stamp demonstrates how female filmmakers who had played a part in early Hollywood’s bid for respectability were in the end written out of that industry’s history.

Consuming Stories: Kara Walker and the Imagining of American Race by Rebecca Peabody

In Consuming Stories, Rebecca Peabody explores a significant yet neglected aspect of Walker’s production: her commitment to examining narrative depictions of race, gender, power, and desire. These stories, Peabody reminds us, not only change the way people remember history but also shape the entertainment industry. Consuming Stories shifts the critical conversation away from the visual legacy of historical racism toward the present-day role of the entertainment industry—and its consumers—in processes of radicalization.


Best of the Blog 2017

As 2017 draws to a close, we’ve compiled ten blog posts that resonated most with our readers over the past year. Popular blog themes closely mirrored current events, and the state of global political realities — immigration, inequality, fascism, and environmental issues; additionally, readers were taken by posts on critical thinking, “slow” cinema, indigenous and world poetry, and the secrets unearthed from an ancient metropolis.

Have a happy new year, and see you in 2018, the 125th year of UC Press’s founding!

Immigration historians from across the United States launched the website #ImmigrationSyllabus to help the public understand the historical roots of today’s immigration debates, inspiring us to follow suit with a list of UC Press suggestions to provide further context to the ongoing conversation. View the Immigration Syllabus: UC Press Edition.

Raj Patel & Jason W. Moore’s A History of the World in Seven Cheap Things focuses on seven areas that are the foundation of modern commerce: nature, money, work, care, food, energy, and lives. In this excerpt, find out how the cheapening of care has made the world safe for capitalism: #7CheapThings: Cheap Care

In Trump’s Transgender Crisis, Jack Halberstam, author of Trans*: A Quick and Quirky Account of Gender Variability, responds to Donald Trump’s tweeted policy change banning trans soldiers from the military to ask: at a time when the visibility and acceptance of transgender people has never been higher, why this ban, why now?

In today’s fast-paced political news cycle, terms like “fascism” and “populism” are often used, but not always clearly defined. This excerpt from Federico Finchelstein’s From Fascism to Populism in History, explores the origins of these ideologies, their significance, and the important distinctions between them: Fascism or Populism? Playing the “Democratic Game”

One of the earliest, largest, and most important cities in the ancient Americas, Teotihuacan is now a UNESCO World Heritage Site and the most visited archaeological site in Mexico. Take a Look at Teotihuacan to see some of the rare and awe-inspiring artifacts featured in the exhibition and accompanying catalogue Teotihuacan: City of Water, City of Fire.


Fifty years since its original publication, Jerome Rothenberg’s Technicians of the Sacred continues to inspire and educate readers with its ability to expand the possibilities of poetry throughout the world. Rothenberg recently visited the UC Press offices to discuss the book’s enduring power and read from the 50th anniversary edition.



Peter M. Nardi, sociologist and author of Critical Thinking: Tools for Evaluating Research, addressed the importance of looking beyond the “two-sides-of-the-coin” perspective when responding to complex issues in his post False Balance, Binary Discourse, and Critical Thinking.

Releasing in May 2018, Paul Schrader’s seminal text Transcendental Style in Film: Ozu, Bresson, Dreyer will be reissued with a substantial new introduction representing his experiences and ideas as a filmmaker that have evolved over time, giving the original work both new clarity and a contemporary lens. Hear Schrader discuss some of the techniques and attitudes of slow films in Transcendental Style in Film Revisited.

During the 2017 International Open Access Week, we interviewed Interim Director Erich van Rijn to survey the landscape of OA publishing at UC Press, discussing the progress and future of Luminos (our OA monograph program), and Collabra: Psychology and Elementa: Science of the Anthropocene (our two OA journals).

What is a case study, and how can case studies positively impact critical thinking and knowledge acquisition, as well as inform research in academia and training in professional practice? In the post The Case for Case StudiesCase Studies in the Environment Editor-in-Chief Wil Burns explains what case studies are, and how they can provide an important bridge to understanding important environmental issues.

Behind the Iconic Protest Posters of the AIDS Activist Movement

By Avram Finkelstein, author of After Silence: A History of AIDS through Its Images

Early in the 1980s AIDS epidemic, six gay activists created one of the most iconic and lasting images that would come to symbolize a movement: a protest poster of a pink triangle with the words “Silence = Death.” Here, Avram Finkelstein, cofounder of the collective Silence = Death and member of the art collective Gran Fury, reveals the process behind some of the most iconic protest artwork associated with the early years of the pandemic. #WorldAidsDay#DayWithoutArt.

Silence = Death, The Silence = Death Project, 1986 poster, offset lithography, 33 1/2 × 22 in.

In 1981, the man I was building my life around started showing signs of immunosuppression, before AIDS even had its name. By 1984, he was dead, a year before Rock Hudson was outed by the disease and died, and years before Reagan ever uttered the word.

It was a time I felt very alone, so in late 1985 I co-founded a men’s consciousness raising group with five friends. We met every week, loosely assembled around feminist organizing principles. We began each session by talking about our new lives in the age of AIDS, but by the end of every meeting we were talking about the political crisis that was forming.

Because of my upbringing, the political poster had always played a role in my understanding of social change, but to be young in the late 1960s was to be political anyway. By 1968, the East and West Villages in New York were papered with manifestos, meetings announcements, and demonstration flyers. When young people needed to communicate with each other, we used the streets.

So I proposed we do a poster about AIDS.

We worked on the poster for months, and put it to bed in late 1986. I had no idea what might happen, but I knew we couldn’t be the only ones who were enraged. We weren’t. Within weeks of our posting them in early 1987, the activist community it came to represent formed, ACTUP (AIDS Coalition To Unleash Power).

AIDSGATE, The Silence = Death Project, 1987 poster, offset lithography, 34 × 22 in.

AIDSGATE was the second poster by the Silence=Death collective, designed specifically for the third ACT UP demonstration, a June 1, 1987 action in Washington DC. It was the first national civil disobedience addressing AIDS, which we saw as a unique opportunity to formally indict Reagan for his lack of response during the early days of the crisis, and its disproportionate impact on women and communities of color. The text crawl across the bottom of the poster reads: “54% of people with AIDS in NYC are Black or Hispanic… AIDS is the No. 1 killer of women between the ages of 24 and 29 in NYC… By 1991, more people will have died of AIDS than in the entire Vietnam War. What is Reagan’s real policy on AIDS? Genocide of all Non-Whites, Non-males and Non-heterosexuals?… Silence=Death.”

When collective member, Oliver Johnston (1952-1990), was finalizing the mechanical for the printer, he unilaterally decided Reagan didn’t look evil enough, and made his eyes hot pink. I’m convinced it is the sole reason this poster was included in the 2012 Metropolitan Museum of Art Andy Warhol exhibition, Regarding Warhol: Sixty Artists, Fifty Years. 

The Government Has Blood on Its Hands, Gran Fury, 1988, poster, offset lithography, 31 3/4 × 21 3/8 in.

On July 19th, 1988, the New York City Commissioner of Health, Stephen Joseph, suddenly halved the number of estimated AIDS cases in NYC, a move that threatened to drastically reduce funding for AIDS services. The cut was purportedly based on cohort studies in San Francisco’s gay community.

ACT UP NY declared war against him. During a sit-in at Joseph’s office a copy of his itinerary was taken, and it became the basis for a campaign spearheaded by an ACT UP affinity group. Several Gran Fury members were involved in the effort to remove Joseph from office, myself included, leading Gran Fury to design a pair of posters featuring bloody handprint images. One read “You’ve Got Blood On Your Hands Stephen Joseph. The Cut In AIDS Numbers Is A Lethal Lie,” and the other targeted then mayor of New York City with the text, “You’ve Got Blood On Your Hands, Ed Koch. NYC AIDS Care Doesn’t Exist.”

That same year, ACT UP decided to target the regulatory agency responsible for the testing of potential AIDS therapies in the US, The Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Given the high and rapid mortality rate, it had become clear that any risks the medications carried could not exceed the risks of non-intervention, and that the clinical trails for the safety and efficacy of these drugs were de facto healthcare for individuals confronting the fatal disease.

Gran Fury, nationalized the bloody hand specifically for the FDA action the statistic “One AIDS Death Every Half Hour.” The FDA action was the turning point for the AIDS activist movement, leading to the streamlining of the drug approval process, the parallel track drug access and compassionate use protocols, and the inclusion of People Living With HIV/AIDS, people of color, and women on research advisory boards.

Avram Finkelstein is a founding member of the Silence = Death and Gran Fury collectives. His work is in the permanent collections of the Museum of Modern Art, the Whitney Museum, the New Museum, and the Smithsonian Archives of American Art.

His book, After Silence: A History of AIDS through Its Images , is available now.

After Silence is an important contribution to the history of AIDS activism. It tells the personal story of a key designer of a crucial political movement and demystifies how design decisions are made amidst political crisis. Compelling and potentially empowering to future visual activists.”—Sarah Schulman, author of The Gentrification of the Mind

“This book is essential for understanding the politics of resistance and the impact of ACT UP in building a movement. After Silence will be an invaluable resource for artists and activists of all ages.”— Ken Gonzales-Day, Professor of Art, Scripps College

Celebrating Wayne Thiebaud: With Cake (and Ice Cream and More)

“It could be considered further satire to use a conservative technique to attempt subversion. It could also be thought having and eating your cake.”—Donald Judd on Wayne Thiebaud, 1962

Today is Wayne Thiebaud’s birthday. Luckily he’s provided the cake, and ice cream, and so much more to celebrate with . . . in our forthcoming catalogue.

Organized in close cooperation with the artist, Wayne Thiebaud: 1958–1968 examines Thiebaud’s ongoing impact on contemporary art through in-depth analysis of the paintings and drawings made at the launch of his career, at a seminal moment when the art world was redefining itself.

Cover image of catalogue
Wayne Thiebaud: 1958–1968 (Available December 2017)

Published in association with the Jan Shrem and Maria Manetti Shrem Museum of Art at the University of California, Davis, this is the first study of the emergence of Thiebaud’s mature style and the only museum exhibition to date to delve into a specific period of his production, a time that coincides with the start of his teaching career at University of California at Davis.

The “soft” nature of Thiebaud’s famous subjects, his creamy pies and dripping ice creams, positioned his art as fodder for social-political review on occasion, but rarely for serious historical analysis. Since the beginning of his career Thiebaud reminded critics of his formal interests and his deep affiliation with the history of painting. This exhibition takes as its starting point an understanding of Thiebaud’s painterly language—its historical sources and contemporary affiliations.

“Thiebaud’s masterful ability to transform paint into the substance it depicts is especially powerful in his dessert paintings.”—Rachel Teagle, Founding Director, Manetti Shrem Museum

Detail photo of painting by Wayne Thiebaud
Detail from Wayne Thiebaud: 1958–1968
Photo of internal catalogue spread featuring paintings by Wayne Thiebaud
Detail from Wayne Thiebaud: 1958–1968

“Painting a row of cakes the way they are displayed on a lunch counter suggests some rather obvious notions about conformism, mechanized living, and mass produced culture. In addition there are some surprising things which are present . . . how alone these endless rows can be . . . a kind of lonely togetherness . . . each piece of pie has a heightened loneliness of its very own giving it a uniqueness and specialness in spite of its regimentation. None of us can escape our responsibility however totalitarian or utopian our world may be.”—Wayne Thiebaud

Contributions by Margaretta Lovell, Alexander Nemerov, Francesca Wilmott, and Arielle Hardy include scholarly essays and an illustrated chronology, resulting in a catalogue that is both visually rich and thought-provoking.

The exhibition opens on January 16, 2018.

Save 30% on the exhibition catalogue with online purchase. Enter code 17M6662 at checkout.

Must-Read Articles for the 2017 World Architecture Festival

The World Architecture Festival, a three-day event for architects and interior design professionals, is being held in Berlin from November 15–17. Whether or not you are attending the Festival, we invite you to read the following articles focused on German architecture from the Journal of the Society of Architectural Historians, which we are making available for free without a subscription for a limited time. 

The Cultural Center Architecture as Cultural Policy in Postwar Europe
Kenny Cupers

Luxury Apartments with a Tenement Heart: The Kurfürstendamm and the Berliner Zimmer
Douglas Mark Klahr

The Hut on the Garden Plot Informal Architecture in Twentieth-Century Berlin
Florian Urban

From “National Style” to “Rationalized Construction”: Mass-Produced Housing, Style, and Architectural Discourse in the East German Journal Deutsche Architektur, 1956–1964
Emily Pugh

Review: Die büürgerliche Villa in Deutschland 1830–1900 by Wolfgang Bröönner; German Cities and Bourgeois Modernism 1890–1924 by Maiken Umbach
Reviewed by Stefan Muthesius

Review: Albert Speer: Architecture 1932–1942, by Léon Krier
Reviewed by Barbara Miller Lane


Save 40% on New & Notable Western History Titles

The 2017 Western History Association convenes November 1-4 in San Diego, CA, and WHA members can save 40% on UC Press titles when they visit us at booth #28.

Get an early look at just some of the titles we’ll have on view by visiting our Western History Association landing page—and take advantage of the conference discount early. Browse new and forthcoming UC Press titles in the field of Western History, and save.

Open in order to . . . . Author Anne Rademacher Explains Why She Published with Luminos

by Anne Rademacher, author of Building Green: Environmental Architects and the Struggle for Sustainability in Mumbai

At UC Press, open access—the free, immediate, unrestricted, online access to peer-reviewed research and scholarly work—is central to our mission. In celebration of 2017 International Open Access Week (October 23-29), we are highlighting open access publishing initiatives at UC Press, including our Collabra and Luminos publishing programs. This year’s OA Week theme “Open in order to . . . ” is an invitation to answer the question of what concrete benefits can be realized by making scholarly publications openly available. Follow the full blog series here#OAWeek #OpenInOrderTo

We live in an age marked by environmental vulnerability—some of it longstanding, and some completely new. In recent weeks, flooding and storm events seemed to serve as a daily reminder of environmental vulnerability: from Florida to Houston to Puerto Rico and across the Caribbean. Just a few months ago, Mumbai, the setting for Building Green: Environmental Architects and the Struggle for Sustainability in Mumbai, experienced record-setting rainfall and catastrophic floods—just one chapter in the story of 2017’s Asian monsoon, a season marked by floods, landslides, and damaging rains that affected millions across the region and killed well over a thousand people.

The frequency and intensity of storm events is just one environmental condition that cities around the world will have to face if they are to maintain basic services like water, energy, and shelter provision—to say nothing of social well being, public health, and safety. Regardless of our location on the global map, we face the question of whether and how we can realize ecological sustainability and social resilience in the context of an uncertain, but certainly unprecedented, environmental future.

If achieving sustainable cities is a key challenge to humanity, then those who seek to design and implement its components—green buildings, open spaces and parks, cleaner energy systems, and the like—are critically important for forging needed change. We might consider certain kinds of green expertise to be essential to the planners, developers, municipal officials, activists, and architects of our future cities. What are their visions and aspirations for sustainable cities and societies? How is training in a “green” urban profession different from conventional training? And, perhaps most importantly, once one knows the tools of the green expert, what does it take to implement them?

Building Green traces the experience of environmental architects as they study to acquire the skills they need, and then try, post-training, to implement what they’ve learned. By recounting architects’ experiences, the book gives us a sense of the layers of powerful interests, institutions, and history that are fundamental aspects of any kind of urban transformation. It underlines the chasm that often exists between practitioners who are trying to make cities more environmentally sound, and the forces that hold sway over how cities are ultimately built—a key obstacle we must overcome if we are to realize a more sustainable urban future.

Why open access? At the level of a future we share in common—one marked by an uncertain and even unprecedented environment—open access allows readers worldwide to learn from one another. But equally important is the potential for open access publications to reach readers who would otherwise be unable to participate in the conversation or to learn from the experiences beyond their geographic context. In the case of Building Green, it is a chance to widely share one group’s story of forging a greener urban future in a complex and unsustainable present.

Anne Rademacher is Associate Professor of Environmental Studies and Anthropology at New York University. Her books include Reigning the River: Urban Ecologies and Political Transformation in Kathmandu, Ecologies of Urbanism in India: Metropolitan Civility and Sustainability, and the edited volume Places of Nature in Ecologies of Urbanism.

Building Green is published in University of California Press’s Luminos open access book program. Click here to download a free digital copy.

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