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Monk’s Music

Thelonious Monk and Jazz History in the Making

Gabriel Solis (Author)

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ISBN: 9780520940963
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Thelonious Monk (1917-1982) was one of jazz's greatest and most enigmatic figures. As a composer, pianist, and bandleader, Monk both extended the piano tradition known as Harlem stride and was at the center of modern jazz's creation during the 1940s, setting the stage for the experimentalism of the 1960s and '70s. This pathbreaking study combines cultural theory, biography, and musical analysis to shed new light on Monk's music and on the jazz canon itself. Gabriel Solis shows how the work of this stubbornly nonconformist composer emerged from the jazz world's fringes to find a central place in its canon. Solis reaches well beyond the usual life-and-times biography to address larger issues in jazz scholarship—ethnography and the role of memory in history's construction. He considers how Monk's stature has grown, from the narrowly focused wing of the avant-garde in the 1960s and '70s to the present, where he is claimed as an influence by musicians of all kinds. He looks at the ways musical lineages are created in the jazz world and, in the process, addresses the question of how musicians use performance itself to maintain, interpret, and debate the history of the musical tradition we call jazz.
Acknowledgments
Introduction

PART ONE. MONK AND HIS MUSIC
1. Prelude: A Biographical Sketch
2. Hearing Monk: History, Memory, and the Making of a Jazz Giant

PART TWO. MONK, MEMORY, AND THE MOMENT OF PERFORMANCE
3. The Question of Voice
4. Three Pianists and the Monk Legacy: Fred Hersch, Danilo Perez, and Jessica Williams

PART THREE. INSIDE AND OUTSIDE: MONK’S LEGACY, NEOCONSERVATISM, AND THE AVANT-GARDE
5. Defining a Genre: Monk and the Struggle to Authenticate Jazz at the End of the Twentieth Century
6. “Classicism” and Performance
7. Monk and Avant-Garde Positions
8. Loving Care: Steve Lacy, Roswell Rudd, and Randy Weston

Afterword
Notes
Bibliography
Index
Gabriel Solis is Assistant Professor of Music at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign.
“Solis’s viewpoints are advanced by excellent writing and argued very competently. . . . . Versatile and timely approach . . . innovative methodology.”—Arsc Journal
“An ambitious work that combines biography, cultural theory and musical analysis to examine not only Monk, his life and work, but the jazz canon itself.”—Jazziz Magazine
“Solis reaches well beyond the usual life-and-times biography to address larger issues in the unfolding of jazz as an art--ethnography and the role of memory in history's construction.”—Ejazznews
“A well-thought-out, original work that makes a strong contribution to jazz ethnography.”—Downbeat
“Well-researched and makes for enjoyable reading.”—Jazzreview.com
“Solis is masterful in his analysis. [He] is an original thinker who can push the still-nascent field of jazz studies into new arenas and dimensions, and Monk's Music [is] a solid work of scholarship.”—Jazzhothouse Blog
“This book will be an important reading for scholars of jazz, American music more generally, and African American Studies, while it should also prove of interest for ethnomusicologists.”—Matthew A. Somoroff Ethnomusicology
“A stimulating read.”—Brian Priestley Jazzwise
“This book offers important observations and ideas. . . . Recommended.”—K. R. Dietrich Choice
"Gabriel Solis's study of Thelonious Monk's legacy energizes an important development in jazz studies. Respectful of Monk and his musical heirs, Solis nevertheless offers insights on Monk myth-building by opposing jazz camps in which both moldy figs and avant-gardists claim him as their own. Moving beyond exploding these turf battles, Solis comes to deep realizations about jazz as a practice. This will become an often-cited work, even a transformative one."—Steven F. Pond, author of Head Hunters: The Making of Jazz's First Platinum Album (winner of the International Association for the Study of Popular Music's Woody Guthrie Prize)

Certificate of Merit, Association for Recorded Sound Collections

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