Cover Image

Larger ImageView Larger

The 1972 Munich Olympics and the Making of Modern Germany

Kay Schiller (Author), Chris Young (Author)

Available worldwide

Paperback, 368 pages
ISBN: 9780520262157
August 2010
$34.95, £24.95
Other Formats Available:
The 1972 Munich Olympics—remembered almost exclusively for the devastating terrorist attack on the Israeli team—were intended to showcase the New Germany and replace lingering memories of the Third Reich. That hope was all but obliterated in the early hours of September 5, when gun-wielding Palestinians murdered 11 members of the Israeli team. In the first cultural and political history of the Munich Olympics, Kay Schiller and Christopher Young set these Games into both the context of 1972 and the history of the modern Olympiad. Delving into newly available documents, Schiller and Young chronicle the impact of the Munich Games on West German society.
List of Illustrations

1. Introduction
2. Urban, State, and National Capital: Buying, Paying for, and Selling the Games
3. The Legacy of Berlin 1936 and the German Past: Problems and Possibilities
4. Germany on the Drawing Board: Architecture, Design, and Ceremony
5. After “1968”: 1972 and the Youth of the World
6. East versus West: German-German Sporting Tensions from Hallstein to Ostpolitik
7. The End of the Games: Germany, the Middle East, and the Terrorist Attack
8. Conclusion: Olympic Legacies

Kay Schiller is Senior Lecturer in History at Durham University. His books on German-Jewish refugee scholars during National Socialism include Gelehrte Gegenwelten and Weltoffener Humanismus (edited with Gerald Hartung). Christopher Young is Reader in Modern and Medieval German Studies and Head of the Department of German and Dutch at the University of Cambridge. He is the author of Narrativische Perspektiven in Wolframs Willehalm and a coauthor of History of the German Language through Texts.
“This is an outstanding book, which will undoubtedly be the definitive treatment of the subject for a long time to come.”—German Studies Review
“Ambitious and exciting . . . a far-reaching yet richly textured portrait of the Federal Republic at a pivotal moment. [This book] deserves the widest audience possible.”—Central European History
“The work certainly provides a substantial contribution to both the historiography of the Olympic games as well as valuable input to modern German history.”—Prudence Mann Melbourne Historical Journal
"Schiller and Young have looked with more care and greater acuity than any of their predecessors at all the chief actors at every level within the German government and within the Olympic movement. If that were all that they had accomplished, they would deserve unstinting admiration, but they have taken the almost unmanageable mass of information and turned it into a lively, engaging, insightful narrative, which places the Games at the very centre of modern German history."—Allen Guttmann, author of The Olympics: A History of the Modern Games and recipient of the International Olympics Committee President's Award for historical scholarship

"The great strength of this stimulating, far-reaching book lies in its ability to excavate the uncanny proximity between the 1972 Munich Olympics and the 1936 Berlin games and between the 1972 tragedy and our own imperfect effort to somehow both ignore and fight terror."—Peter Fritzsche, author of Life and Death in the Third Reich

"This book is nothing short of a tour de force on every conceivable level: the breadth of its topics, the depth of its research, the elegance of its writing, the acuity of its argumentation. It is a must read for anybody interested in the Olympics and sports; just as it is for those wanting to learn exquisite details and appreciate wondrous insights about German politics and society; the relationship between East and West (in Germany, Europe and the world); German-Jewish-Israeli-Arab relations; city planning; the Sixties and their legacies to mention just some salient dimensions of this immensely rich book. I remain awed by this work."—Andrei S. Markovits, co-author of Gaming the World: How Sports are Reshaping Global Politics and Culture

Aberdare History Prize, British Society of Sports History

Shortlisted for the Aberdare History Prize, British Society of Sports History

Best Book Award, North American Society for Sport History

Save 30%

Add source code 15W5487 to get your discount at checkout.
Cannot be combined with any other offers.

Join UC Press

Members receive 20-40% discounts on book purchases. Find out more