Elementa: Science of the Anthropocene Call for Papers: Sustainability Transitions

We invite you to submit your next paper to the Sustainability Transitions domain of Elementa: Science of the Anthropocene, a trans-disciplinary, open-access journal whose mission is Open Science for the Public Good.

Elementa publishes original research with the ultimate objective of accelerating scientific solutions to the challenges presented by this era of human impact. Structured into six distinct knowledge domains, the Sustainability Transitions domain welcomes contributions that advance knowledge on shifting society-environment interactions to sustainability — to a world in which human beings and other life flourish in diverse social and environmental contexts. A primary purpose of this domain is to bridge boundaries among disciplines, geographies, cultures, and institutions, and between scholars and practitioners; thus, we encourage submissions from scholars in the social and natural sciences and humanities, and practitioners, innovators, and leaders who are forging ahead with strategies to shift towards sustainability.

For the full Aims & Scope of the Sustainability Transitions domain, please click here.

In addition to innovative features including a value-sharing business model and an article-promotion partnership with Kudos, Elementa articles are highly used and downloaded (see highlighted articles below). For the full Elementa story, visit our website at elementascience.org.

For Elementa news and updates, be sure to follow along on Facebook and Twitter.

There has never been a more important time to ensure that transparent, evidence-based, peer-reviewed research has the widest and most impactful dissemination as possible. Please consider submitting your papers to Elementa or developing a Special Feature or Forum, and feel free to get in touch with Anne Kapuscinski, Dartmouth, Editor in Chief for Sustainability Transitions, should you have any questions.


Special Forums currently open for submissions

Multi-stakeholder initiatives for sustainable supply networks
Food-energy-water systems: Opportunities at the Nexus
Cuba’s agrifood system in transition
New Pathways to Sustainability in Agroecological Systems

High-impact Sustainability Transitions content from Elementa: Science of the Anthropocene

(All metrics from March 15, 2017)

Carrying capacity of U.S. agricultural land: Ten diet scenarios
Peters CJ, Picardy J, Darrouzet-Nardi AF, Wilkins JL, Griffin TS, et al. 2016.
Total usage: 73,969 views/downloads since original publication on July 22, 2016

Farmer perceptions of climate change risk and associated on-farm management strategies in Vermont, northeastern United States
Rachel E. Schattman, David Conner, V. Ernesto Méndez
Total usage: 7,373 views/downloads since original publication on Oct 12, 2016

Opportunities for energy-water nexus management in the Middle East & North Africa
Farid AM, Lubega WN, Hickman WW. 2016.
Total usage: 6,043 views/downloads since original publication on Oct 26, 2016


Elementa: Science of the Anthropocene Call for Papers: Ocean Science

We invite you to submit your next paper to the Ocean Science domain of Elementa: Science of the Anthropocene, a trans-disciplinary, open-access journal whose mission is Open Science for the Public Good.

Elementa publishes original research with the ultimate objective of accelerating scientific solutions to the challenges presented by this era of human impact. It is structured into six distinct knowledge domains, and gives authors the unique opportunity to publish in one or multiple domains, helping to present their research in its broader, interconnected context.

In addition to innovative features including a value-sharing business model and an article-promotion partnership with Kudos, Elementa articles are highly used and downloaded (see highlighted articles below). For the full Elementa story, visit our website at elementascience.org.

For Elementa news and updates, be sure to follow along on Facebook and Twitter.

There has never been a more important time to ensure that transparent, evidence-based, peer-reviewed research has the widest and most impactful dissemination as possible. Please consider submitting your ocean science papers to Elementa or developing a Special Feature (e.g. ASPIRE), and feel free to get in touch with Jody Deming, University of Washington, Editor in Chief for Ocean Science, should you have any questions.


Special Features open for submissions

Impacts of natural versus anthropogenic oil inputs on the Gulf of Mexico Ecosystem
Advances in ocean acidification research
The sea surface microlayer
Oceans and human health in a changing environment
Marginal ice zone processes in the summertime Arctic
Climate change impacts: Fish, fisheries and fisheries management
Biogeochemical Exchange Processes at Sea-Ice Interfaces (BEPSII)

High-impact Ocean Science content from Elementa: Science of the Anthropocene

(All metrics from March 6, 2017)

Evidence of lasting impact of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill on a deep Gulf of Mexico coral community
Hsing P, Fu B, Larcom EA, Berlet SP, Shank TM, et al. 2013.
Total usage: 27,861 since original publication on Dec 04, 2013

The evolution and future of carbonate precipitation in marine invertebrates: Witnessing extinction or documenting resilience in the Anthropocene?
Drake JL, Mass T, Falkowski PG. 2014.
Total usage: 23,407 since original publication on May 07, 2014

The changing Arctic Ocean
Arrigo KR. 2013.
Total usage: 20,186 since original publication on Dec 04, 2013

Solar energy capture and transformation in the sea
Karl DM. 2014.
Total usage: 20,142 since original publication on Jan 08, 2014


The Intersection of Religion and Environmental Activism

by Amanda J. Baugh, author of God and the Green Divide: Religious Environmentalism in Black and White

On Monday afternoon, the Rev. Canon Sally Bingham spoke in front of the office of Senator Dianne Feinstein as part of #DayAgainstDenial, a nationwide series of events asking senators to block climate change deniers from serving in the Trump cabinet. Leaders of the ecumenical Christian group Creation Justice Ministries and the Coalition on the Environment in Jewish Life, and even evangelical and Catholic pro-life Christian groups have also banded together to oppose the appointment of Scott Pruitt to head the EPA. These groups appeal to their scriptures and faith traditions as they urge legislators to advance a biblical mandate to be good stewards of God’s Creation.

This type of religiously grounded environmental activism has become increasingly prevalent in the last decade, but the motivations inspiring religious communities to act are much more complicated than a simple hunch that God wants us to “go green.”

In God and the Green Divide, I examine religious environmental organizing in Chicago to show how dynamics of race, ethnicity, and class have shaped contemporary “greening of religion” movements. Focusing on the interfaith environmental organization Faith in Place, I analyze differing environmental values and motivations among the organization’s black and white participants. Faith in Place’s leaders suggested that every religion supports concern for the earth so all people of faith must take measures to protect the planet. Yet participants engaged in environmental activism based on a complex set of factors specific to their own communities, including concerns about job opportunities and health, urgencies of displaying positive civic identity, and feelings of guilt that arise from white privilege. Attending to the complex array of factors that shape individuals’ decisions to “go green” can offer a more complete understanding of the intersection of contemporary religious and environmental worlds.


Amanda J. Baugh is Assistant Professor of Religion and Environment at California State University, Northridge.


Earth & Environmental Science and Ecology from Elementa: Science of the Anthropocene

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The AGU Fall Meeting continues. Thank you, again, to all attendees who have visited the UC Press booth 1512, which is featuring Elementa: Science of the Anthropocene for the first time. Today’s featured domains are Earth and Environmental Science, and Ecology.

If you’re interested in seeing how much usage, exposure, and impact your next article could get when submitted for consideration at Elementa, don’t delay and submit at www.elementascience.org. (Or, write with an enquiry to an Editor in Chief, or the publisher, Dan Morgan, at dmorgan@ucpress.edu.)

Thank you for reading!


Earth and Environmental Science

(All metrics from December 8, 2016)

Dating the Anthropocene: Towards an empirical global history of human transformation of the terrestrial biosphere
Ellis EC, Fuller DQ, Kaplan JO, Lutters WG. 2013.
Total views: 29,114 since original publication on Dec 04, 2013

Seasonally varying contributions to urban CO2 in the Chicago, Illinois, USA region: Insights from a high-resolution CO2 concentration and δ13C record
Moore J, Jacobson AD. 2015.
Total views: 17,802 since original publication on Jun 05, 2015

Sources and sinks of carbon in boreal ecosystems of interior Alaska: A review
Douglas TA, Jones MC, Hiemstra CA, Arnold JR. 2014.
Total views: 17,273 Since original publication on Nov 07, 2014

Earthcasting the future Critical Zone
Goddéris Y, Brantley SL. 2013.
Total views: 16,809 since original publication on Dec 04, 2013

Special Features open for submissions and enquiries
Deltas in the Anthropocene

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Ecology

(All metrics from December 8, 2016)

Warming, soil moisture, and loss of snow increase Bromus tectorum’s population growth rate
Compagnoni A, Adler PB. 2014.
Total views: 22,474 since original publication on Jan 08, 2014

Quantifying flooding regime in floodplain forests to guide river restoration
Marks CO, Nislow KH, Magilligan FJ. 2014.
Total views: 20,006 since original publication on Sep 03, 2014

Biotic impoverishment
Naeem S. 2013.
Total views: 18,999 since original publication on Dec 04, 2013

Towards a general theory of biodiversity for the Anthropocene
Cardinale BJ. 2013.
Total views: 16,438 since original publication on Dec 04, 2013

Special Feature
Urban Aquatic Ecosystems: New approaches to understanding urban aquatic ecosystems


Sustainability Transitions and Sustainable Engineering from Elementa: Science of the Anthropocene

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Thank you to everyone who has come to see Elementa: Science of the Anthropocene so far at Booth 1512 (UC Press) at the AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco. Today, we present our highly downloaded content in the domains of Sustainability Transitions, and Sustainable Engineering.

Have your recent publications at other journals received the same amount of usage and exposure? (e.g. 60,000+ views since July 2016…see below). Does everyone who should read your work have access to it? If not, or in doubt, (or even just because!) submit your next article to us at www.elementascience.org or get in touch with Dan Morgan at dmorgan@ucpress.edu or Kim Locke at klocke@elementascience.org in the first instance, or come and see us at AGU booth 1512.


Sustainability Transitions

(All metrics from December 8, 2016)

Expert opinion on extinction risk and climate change adaptation for biodiversity
Javeline D, Hellmann JJ, McLachlan JS, Sax DF, Schwartz MW, et al. 2015.

Carrying capacity of U.S. agricultural land: Ten diet scenarios
Peters CJ, Picardy J, Darrouzet-Nardi AF, Wilkins JL, Griffin TS, et al. 2016.
Total views: 62,799 since original publication on July 22, 2016

Opportunities for energy-water nexus management in the Middle East & North Africa
Farid AM, Lubega WN, Hickman WW. 2016.
Total views: 4,210 since original publication under 2 months ago on Oct 26, 2016

Special Features open for submissions and enquiries
Avoiding collapse
The extinction of deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon: Is it possible?

Forums open for submissions
Cuba’s agrifood system in transition
Multi-stakeholder initiatives for sustainable supply networks
New Pathways to Sustainability in Agroecological Systems

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Sustainable Engineering

(All metrics from December 8, 2016)

Geoengineering redivivus
Allenby B. 2014.
Total views: 16,588 since original publication Feb 12, 2014

Forum open for submissions
Food-energy-water systems: Opportunities at the nexus


Atmospheric Science and Ocean Science from Elementa: Science of the Anthropocene

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Moving into Day 2 of Elementa: Science of the Anthropocene at the American Geophysical Union’s Fall Meeting, we are pleased to present some highly downloaded content from our Atmospheric Science, and Ocean Science, domains.

Do you want the chance for similar exposure for your work? Submit your next article to us at www.elementascience.org or get in touch with dmorgan@ucpress.edu in the first instance, or come and see us at AGU booth 1512.


Atmospheric Science

Highlighted articles
(All metrics from December 8, 2016)

Global distribution and trends of tropospheric ozone: An observation-based review
Cooper OR, Parrish DD, Ziemke J, Balashov NV, Cupeiro M, et al. 2014.
Total views: 28,750 since original publication on July 10, 2014

Influence of oil and gas emissions on ambient atmospheric non-methane hydrocarbons in residential areas of Northeastern Colorado
Thompson CR, Hueber J, Helmig D. 2014.
Total views: 22,538 since original publication on Nov 14, 2014

Dimethyl sulfide control of the clean summertime Arctic aerosol and cloud
Leaitch WR, Sharma S, Huang L, Toom-Sauntry D, Chivulescu A, et al. 2013.
Total views: 17,585 since original publication on Dec 04, 2013

Special Feature open for submissions
Quantification of urban greenhouse gas emissions: The Indianapolis Flux experiment

Forum open for submissions
Oil and Natural Gas Development: Air Quality, Climate Science, and Policy

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Ocean Science

(All metrics from December 8, 2016)

Evidence of lasting impact of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill on a deep Gulf of Mexico coral community
Hsing P, Fu B, Larcom EA, Berlet SP, Shank TM, et al. 2013.
Total views: 25,644 since original publication on Dec 04, 2013

The evolution and future of carbonate precipitation in marine invertebrates: Witnessing extinction or documenting resilience in the Anthropocene?
Drake JL, Mass T, Falkowski PG. 2014.
Total views: 21,489 since original publication on May 07, 2014

The changing Arctic Ocean
Arrigo KR. 2013.
Total views: 19,168 since original publication on Dec 04, 2013

Solar energy capture and transformation in the sea
Karl DM. 2014.
Total views: 18,706 since original publication on Jan 08, 2014

Special Features open for submissions and enquiries

Impacts of natural versus anthropogenic oil inputs on the Gulf of Mexico Ecosystem

Advances in ocean acidification research

The sea surface microlayer

Oceans and human health in a changing environment

Marginal ice zone processes in the summertime Arctic

Climate change impacts: Fish, fisheries and fisheries management

Biogeochemical Exchange Processes at Sea-Ice Interfaces (BEPSII)


Elementa: Science of the Anthropocene – Open Science for Public Good

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The American Geophysical Union (AGU) Fall Meeting this week in San Francisco marks our first public event as the new publisher of the open access journal Elementa: Science of the Anthropocene. If you are at the event, please stop by our booth number 1512. (Other UC Press products and books will also be on display.)

For those new to it, Elementa: Science of the Anthropocene is a trans-disciplinary, open-access journal with the ultimate objective of accelerating scientific solutions to the challenges presented by this era of human impact. It is structured into six distinct knowledge domains, and gives authors the opportunity to publish in one or multiple domains, helping them to present their research and commentary to interested readers from disciplines related to their own.

Because such solutions will require collaboration among all research disciplines, and among academics, practitioners, and policymakers, the journal’s trans-disciplinary nature is essential. For the sake of presenting articles in a series this week during AGU, we will focus on each of the domains in turn. (And we begin tomorrow with Atmospheric Science and Ocean Science.)

We want to particularly highlight our content’s high usage and download metrics—there has doubtless never been a more important time to ensure that this research has the widest and most open dissemination as possible. By getting published at Elementa, you will maximize your exposure, and we have the metrics to prove it.

If you have an article you would like to submit, or a special feature or forum you would like to propose, please visit www.elementascience.org, or get in touch with dmorgan@ucpress.edu in the first instance, or come and see us at AGU booth 1512.

Please watch this short video introducing Elementa, and check out the general list of special features and forums that are open for submissions, below it.

Special Features currently accepting submissions

Forums currently accepting submissions


Breaking Down Barriers: Publishing Open Access Science for Sustainability

As part of International Open Access Week 2016, UC Press offers the following excerpt from the Union of Concerned Scientists (UCS) and Elementa Editor-in-Chief Anne Kapuscinski. Stay tuned all week for more special content from UC Press Open Access initiatives.

Anne Kapuscinski and Michael Pollan talk on Food Day.

In my new role of Chair of the Board of the Union of Concerned Scientists (UCS), I had the great honor of joining UCS’ delegation at the Paris COP21 climate meeting last December. A clear message from Paris was that we must rapidly transition to a net-zero and climate-resilient society. Scientists at the recent 1.5 Degrees Conference at Oxford University, co-sponsored by UCS, underscored the magnitude of the challenge. And, on Food Day, my public conversation with Michael Pollan at Dartmouth mentioned that agroecology research shows a clear opportunity to help transition our nation’s food system to sustainability, a goal of Plate of the Union.

If you’re reading this blog, you probably agree that our society needs more active engagement of scientists in solving grand sustainability challenges. And you’re aware that when scientists from different disciplines and ways of seeing the world interact, new perspectives and solutions emerge. Thankfully, the current generation of young scientists is embracing trans-disciplinary approaches to their research, with the skills to match the task. But when trying to publish their work, they face the obstacle that most academic journals are organized along traditional disciplinary silos, with editorial boards ill-equipped or unwilling to review papers reflecting this critically needed cross-fertilization. And they hunger for fully open access publishing instead of paywalls restricting access to their papers… Read more on the Union of Concerned Scientists’ blog, The Equation

 

About the author: Anne Kapuscinski is Editor-in-Chief of the Sustainability Transitions domain of UC Press’s trans-disciplinary, Open Access journal Elementa: Science of the Anthropocene. Her current research is on integrated food-energy systems and on algae-based feed for a sustainability transition in aquaculture—the world’s fastest growing food sector.

 


Myriad Atlases: Now Available as E-Books

UC Press is pleased to announce that the following titles in the Myriad Atlas Series The Atlas of Climate Change, The Atlas of Religion, The Atlas of Food, The State of China Atlas, The Atlas of Global Inequalities, and The Atlas of California are now available for the first time, in addition to their print format versions, as e-book editions.

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Sample interior spreads (please click to expand):


CLIMATE-CHANGE-Low-carbon

CALIFORNIA-Health-care

FOOD-unequal-distrib.-food2

About Myriad Atlases:

Myriad’s award-winning atlases, some of which are published in the United States by University of California Press, are unique visual surveys of economic, political and social trends. By ingeniously transforming statistical data into valuable, user-friendly resources, they make a range of global issues – from climate change to world religions – accessible to general readers, students and professionals alike.


Is Climate Change a Religious Issue?

by Evan Berry, author of Devoted to Nature: The Religious Roots of American Environmentalism

Some Americans, especially among the most trenchant ranks of conservative Catholics, have expressed outrage about Pope Francis’ direct engagement with environmental issues. For example, in his open letter explaining his boycott of the Pope’s address to Congress, Representative Paul Gosar (R-AZ) decried the Vatican’s unfortunate departure from “standard Christian theology.” In a different line of attack, the Heartland Institute, a conservative think tank, claims to have identified the creeping influence of “paganism” in Laudato Si, the Pope’s encyclical on climate change. One the other side of the aisle, many political liberals, both inside and outside the American Catholic community, are thrilled about Pope Francis’ candid discussion of climate change and his message of justice and mercy. Setting aside for the moment the embittered and divisive tenor of American politics, this public scuffle reminds us that many people in the U.S. continue to disagree not just about what bearing religion might have on environmental issues, but about whether it should have any bearing at all.

Scenes from the Life of St Francis (Scene 7), 1452
Scenes from the Life of St Francis (Scene 7), 1452

When climate skeptics suggest we “leave science to the scientists,” they are asserting a partition between the technocratic process of policy construction and various other forms of knowledge, including especially religiously grounded moral convictions. This is an old ideology about the place religion ought have in American public life, one that holds that religion is primarily about private beliefs and that it should not be publicly invoked in political discourse. A number of excellent books have described the way this paradigm held sway throughout the middle decades of the 20th century, but receded into the background along with the rise of the Christian Right as an internally coherent voting block (e.g. Christian Smith’s Christian America). Although it is ironic that this point of view should reappear among precisely the same constituency that once tore it down, the underappreciated story about conservative religious objections to religious environmentalism is that they are historically wrongheaded.

9780520285736The idea that Christianity is a radically anthropocentric religion drove a deep wedge between environmentalists and traditionalists, but as religiously inflected ecological movements continue to grow and mature, other stories about Christianity’s environmental legacy are resurfacing. Devoted to Nature tells such a story, arguing not that Christians have been central to the development of the American environmental movement, but that Christian theological ideas have had a profound impact on the particular shape the movement took, especially during the formative decades at the end of the 19th and beginning of the 20th centuries. Questions about whether or not human beings should be understood as part of the natural order or as something apart from it are equally essential to both environmentalism and to Christian theology. Efforts to reconcile humanity to a broken and betrayed environment are deeply indebted to the Genesis account of human origins. As Pope Francis and other religious leaders continue to agitate for climate justice, we would do well not to ask whether their voices have a legitimate place in environmental politics, but instead to ask more probing questions about how our environmental politics themselves are generated by our religious histories.


Evan Berry is Associate Professor of Philosophy and Religion at American University and Codirector of its Ethics, Peace, and Global Affairs master’s program.