Elementa: Science of the Anthropocene Call for Papers: Ecology

We invite you to submit your next paper to the Ecology domain of Elementa: Science of the Anthropocene, a trans-disciplinary, open-access journal whose mission is Open Science for the Public Good.

Elementa publishes original research with the ultimate objective of accelerating scientific solutions to the challenges presented by this era of human impact. Structured into six distinct knowledge domains, the Ecology domain will consider research centered on the ways in which humans are intentionally and unintentionally altering the conditions for life on Earth and the resulting ecological implications. These anthropogenic effects manifest at molecular levels and can cascade into physiological, population, community, ecosystem, landscape and global responses. Elementa will report new breakthroughs across these levels of ecological organization as well as for all domains of life.

For the full Aims & Scope of the Ecology domain, please click here.

In addition to innovative features including a value-sharing business model and an article-promotion partnership with Kudos, Elementa articles are highly used and downloaded (see highlighted articles below). For the full Elementa story, visit our website at elementascience.org.

For Elementa news and updates, be sure to follow along on Facebook and Twitter.

There has never been a more important time to ensure that transparent, evidence-based, peer-reviewed research has the widest and most impactful dissemination as possible. Please consider submitting your ecological science papers to Elementa or developing a Special Feature or Forum, and feel free to get in touch with Donald R. Zak, University of Michigan, Editor in Chief for Ecology, should you have any questions.


Recent Special Features from the Ecology domain

New approaches to understanding urban aquatic ecosystems

High-impact Ecology content from Elementa: Science of the Anthropocene 

(All metrics from March 23, 2017)

Warming, soil moisture, and loss of snow increase Bromus tectorum’s population growth rate
Compagnoni A, Adler PB. 2014.
Total usage: 23,947 views/downloads since original publication on Jan 08, 2014

Quantifying flooding regime in floodplain forests to guide river restoration
Marks CO, Nislow KH, Magilligan FJ. 2014.
Total usage: 21,709 views/downloads since original publication on Sep 03, 2014

Biotic impoverishment
Naeem S. 2013.
Total usage: 20,328 views/downloads since original publication on Dec 04, 2013

Towards a general theory of biodiversity for the Anthropocene
Cardinale BJ. 2013.
Total usage: 17,863 views/downloads since original publication on Dec 04, 2013


UC Press Music Journals Celebrate American Music

As musicologists gather in Montreal for the Society for American Music conference, UC Press’s music journals are pleased to make select content available to non-subscribers for a limited time. Please enjoy our #AmMusic17 offerings from the Journal of the American Musicological Society, the Journal of Musicology, Music Perceptionand 19th-Century Music.

Film Scholars gathering in Chicago for the annual meeting of the Society for Cinema and Media Studies will also find some articles of interest in the offerings below and should see our separate post with offerings from Film Quarterly and Feminist Media Histories.


The Journal of the American Musicological Society is proud to have been the recipient of six Irving Lowens Article Awards from the Society for American Music since 1997. Read these articles for free through the end of March:

Sam Cooke as Pop Album Artist—A Reinvention in Three Songs
Mark Burford
Vol. 65 No. 1, Spring 2012

The Testimonial Aesthetics of Different Trains
Amy Lynn Wlodarski
Vol. 63 No. 1, Spring 2010

Louis Armstrong, Eccentric Dance, and the Evolution of Jazz on the Eve of Swing
Brian Harker
Vol. 61 No. 1, Spring 2008

Henry Cowell and John Cage: Intersections and Influences, 1933–1941
Leta E. Miller
Vol. 59 No. 1, Spring 2006

The Early Life and Career of the “Black Patti”: The Odyssey of an African American Singer in the Late Nineteenth Century
John Graziano
Vol. 53 No. 3, Autumn, 2000

For Those We Love: Hindemith, Whitman, and “An American Requiem”
Kim H. Kowalke
Vol. 50 No.1, Spring 1997


The Journal of Musicology is pleased to make the following articles, which look at various aspects of American music (including an article on Irving Berlin’s Holiday Inn) free through the end of March:

Consensus and Crisis in American Classical Music Historiography from 1890 to 1950
David C. Paul
Vol. 33 No. 2, Spring 2016

On the Scenic Route to Irving Berlin’s Holiday Inn (1942)
Todd Decker
Vol. 28 No. 4, Fall 2011

University Geographies and Folk Music Landscapes: Students and Local Folksingers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1961–1964
David K. Blake
Vol. 33 No. 1, Winter 2016

Grasp the Weapon of Culture! Radical Avant-Gardes and the Los Angeles Free Press
Andre Mount
Vol. 32 No. 1, Winter 2015


Music Perception offers the following articles free through month’s end:

Viewers’ Interpretations of Film Characters’ Emotions: Effects of Presenting Film Music Before or After a Character is Shown
Siu-Lan Tan, Matthew P. Spackman, Matthew A. Bezdek
Vol. 25 No. 2, December 2007

Swing Rhythm in Classic Drum Breaks From Hip-Hop’s Breakbeat Canon 
by Andrew V. Frane
Vol 34 No. 3, February 2017

Rhythm in the Speech and Music of Jazz and Riddim Musicians
Angela C. Carpenter, Andrea G. Levitt
Vol. 34 No. 1, September 2016

The Asymmetrical Influence of Timing Asynchrony of Bass Guitar and Drum Sounds on Groove
Soyogu Matsushita, Shingo Nomura
Vol. 34 No. 2, December 2016


19th-Century Music celebrates #AmMusic17 and #SCMS17 by offering a selection of articles on American film music. As with the articles above, you can read the following for free through the end of the month:

Black Voices, White Women’s Tears, and the Civil War in Classical Hollywood Movies
Robynn J. Stilwell
Vol. 40 No. 1, Summer 2016

Screwball Fantasia: Classical Music in Unfaithfully Yours
Martin Marks
Vol. 34 No. 3, Spring 2011

Listening to the Self: The Shawshank Redemption and the Technology of Music
Daniel K. L. Chua
Vol. 34 No. 3, Spring 2011


Cinema & Soundtracks: FMH and FQ Celebrate #SCMS17

With the annual meeting of the Society for Cinema & Media Studies beginning this week in Chicago, UC Press journals Feminist Media Histories and Film Quarterly are pleased to offer a collection of limited-time free articles on cinema, soundtracks, and film music. Enjoy free access to these articles today through the end of the meeting on March 26, and be sure to meet the editors if you are attending #SCMS17!


Feminist Media Histories

Editor: Shelley Stamp, University of California, Santa Cruz

SCMS Attendees: Connect with FMH at SCMS 2017!

  • Meet the Editor, Shelley Stamp, to discuss publishing your work in FMH, at the UC Press booth on Friday, 3/24 from 11:00am-12:00pm.
  • Don’t miss the announcement of the winner of the 2016 SCMS Women’s Caucus Graduate Student Writing Prize (co-sponsored by FMH) at the SCMS Women’s Caucus Meeting!

 

In Defense of Voicelessness: The Matter of the Voice and the Films of Leslie Thornto
Pooja Rangan
Summer 2015, Vol. 1 No. 3

Tinkering with Cultural Memory: Gender and the Politics of Synthesizer Historiography
Tara Rodgers
Fall 2015, Vol. 1 No. 4

Backpacking Sounds: Sneha Khanwalkar and the “New” Soundtrack of Bombay Cinema
Shikha Jhingan
Fall 2015, Vol. 1 No. 4

Nené Cascallar’s Thirsty Heart: Gender, Voice, and Desire in a 1950s Argentine Radio Serial
Christine Ehrick
Fall 2015, Vol. 1 No. 4


Film Quarterly

Editor: B. Ruby Rich
Associate Editor: Regina Longo

SCMS attendees: connect with FQ at SCMS 2017!
Associate Editor Regina Longo will be available for meetings at the UC Press booth on Thursday and Friday afternoons.

Just in time for #SCMS17, Film Quarterly is delighted to unveil a newly redesigned website at filmquarterly.org. The refreshed site is fully device responsive and features a stronger visual component with full integration of social media, audio, and video. Full journal content continues to be housed at fq.ucpress.edu, but subscribers and non-subscribers alike are invited to read a curated selection of articles and web-only features on the new filmquarterly.org site.

Given that the annual conferences for both SCMS and the Society for American Music are being held this week, Film Quarterly’s editors would like to call your attention to a selection of articles (all available for free on filmquarterly.org) that should interest attendees of both #SCMS17 and #AmMusic17.

One Step Ahead: A Conversation with Barry Jenkins,
Michael Boyce Gillespie’s interview with the director of the Academy Award-winning Moonlight appears in the newly published Spring issue of Film Quarterly (read online or stop by the UC Press booth at SCMS to peruse a print copy).

Jewish, Queer-ish, Trans, and Completely Revolutionary: Jill Soloway’s Transparent and the New Television
Amy Villarejo
Summer 2016, Vol. 69 No. 4

The Master’s Voice
Claudia Gorbman
Winter 2014, Vol. 68 No. 2

Giving Credit to Paratexts in Top of the Lake and Orange Is the New Black
Kathleen McHugh
Spring 2015, Vol. 68 No. 3

Walking, Talking, Singing, Dancing, Exploding . . . and Silence: Chantal Akerman’s Sountracks
Barbara McBane
Fall 2016, Vol. 70 No. 1


Elementa: Science of the Anthropocene Call for Papers: Sustainability Transitions

We invite you to submit your next paper to the Sustainability Transitions domain of Elementa: Science of the Anthropocene, a trans-disciplinary, open-access journal whose mission is Open Science for the Public Good.

Elementa publishes original research with the ultimate objective of accelerating scientific solutions to the challenges presented by this era of human impact. Structured into six distinct knowledge domains, the Sustainability Transitions domain welcomes contributions that advance knowledge on shifting society-environment interactions to sustainability — to a world in which human beings and other life flourish in diverse social and environmental contexts. A primary purpose of this domain is to bridge boundaries among disciplines, geographies, cultures, and institutions, and between scholars and practitioners; thus, we encourage submissions from scholars in the social and natural sciences and humanities, and practitioners, innovators, and leaders who are forging ahead with strategies to shift towards sustainability.

For the full Aims & Scope of the Sustainability Transitions domain, please click here.

In addition to innovative features including a value-sharing business model and an article-promotion partnership with Kudos, Elementa articles are highly used and downloaded (see highlighted articles below). For the full Elementa story, visit our website at elementascience.org.

For Elementa news and updates, be sure to follow along on Facebook and Twitter.

There has never been a more important time to ensure that transparent, evidence-based, peer-reviewed research has the widest and most impactful dissemination as possible. Please consider submitting your papers to Elementa or developing a Special Feature or Forum, and feel free to get in touch with Anne Kapuscinski, Dartmouth, Editor in Chief for Sustainability Transitions, should you have any questions.


Special Forums currently open for submissions

Multi-stakeholder initiatives for sustainable supply networks
Food-energy-water systems: Opportunities at the Nexus
Cuba’s agrifood system in transition
New Pathways to Sustainability in Agroecological Systems

High-impact Sustainability Transitions content from Elementa: Science of the Anthropocene

(All metrics from March 15, 2017)

Carrying capacity of U.S. agricultural land: Ten diet scenarios
Peters CJ, Picardy J, Darrouzet-Nardi AF, Wilkins JL, Griffin TS, et al. 2016.
Total usage: 73,969 views/downloads since original publication on July 22, 2016

Farmer perceptions of climate change risk and associated on-farm management strategies in Vermont, northeastern United States
Rachel E. Schattman, David Conner, V. Ernesto Méndez
Total usage: 7,373 views/downloads since original publication on Oct 12, 2016

Opportunities for energy-water nexus management in the Middle East & North Africa
Farid AM, Lubega WN, Hickman WW. 2016.
Total usage: 6,043 views/downloads since original publication on Oct 26, 2016


Elementa Sustainability Transitions Invites Submissions to Special Forum

 

On behalf of Elementa‘s Sustainability Transitions domain, we would like to invite you to submit a Research Article or Practice Bridge to the not-for-profit, Open Access scientific journal, Elementa: Science of the Anthropocene.

Kevin J. Dooley, Sustainability Transitions Associate Editor, Department of Supply Chain Management, Arizona State University, is currently inviting submissions to a special forum on “Multi-stakeholder Initiatives for Sustainable Supply Networks”. This forum encourages interdisciplinary and especially practitioner perspectives to address the sustainability transition challenge: How are multi‐stakeholder initiatives being used to create sustainable supply networks?

For those new to it, Elementa is a mission-driven Open Access journal whose ultimate objective is to publish original research reporting that accelerates scientific solutions to the challenges presented by this era of human impact. Elementa articles receive high usage and download metrics (see example articles below), and authors can look forward to their freely-accessible work having a significant impact across interdisciplinary fields and diverse audiences.

For any author whose article is accepted but cannot pay for the Article Processing Charge (APC), an APC waiver fund is available (more on our value-sharing model here). There are no fees for submission.

Here are examples of a:

Published article in this forum:

Practice bridge:

Research article:

Please consider submitting your papers to the Special Forum, and feel free to get in touch with Kevin Dooley should you have any questions or inquiries.


Consumer Citizenship: A Preview of the Gastronomica/SOAS Distinguished Lecture

Since 2014, Gastronomica: The Journal of Critical Food Studies has partnered with University of London’s SOAS Food Studies Centre to co-sponsor a Distinguished Lecture Series for leading scholars, students, journalists, practitioners and members of the public to engage in critical conversations about the nature of food, the interconnectivity of contemporary food systems, the role of food in daily life, and emerging trends in food studies.

In advance of the next event on March 16Amita Baviskar gives readers a taste of her upcoming lecture, “Consumer Citizenship: The Social Life of Industrial Foods in India.” Click here to register for the Lecture.


Across northern India, roadside stalls and restaurants announce themselves as ‘Maggi Point’ and ‘Maggi Corner.’ Maggi, a brand of instant noodles introduced in the late 1980s, is now not only a popular snack, but the favorite comfort food of an entire generation of young urban Indians. What is the secret of Maggi’s success? And what does it tell us about taste and desire in the heart of a consumer economy in a deeply unequal society?

I began noticing products like Maggi noodles when they first appeared in village shops. Surely the novelty of splurging on these brightly packaged bits of junk must be limited to the well-off few, I wondered. However, such products were soon crowding each other on grocery shelves. What I was witnessing was part of an explosion in the consumption of industrial foods, as Jack Goody called mass-manufactured edible commodities produced and distributed by corporate firms.

My growing interest in the life of industrial foods has led me to students and migrant squatter settlements, street vendors and supermarkets, advertising companies and processing plants, television studios and government offices as I follow the threads of how instant noodles are produced, distributed and consumed. At first glance, this seemed to be a familiar story about the commodification of diets in an era of economic liberalization. Soon, however, I came to realize that it was also about citizenship, about poor and low-caste people who continue to be denied social and economic rights striving for respect and dignity. The success of instant noodles is partly sparked by their aspiration to belong to a nation increasingly defined by the consumption of fetishized commodities.

Instant noodles also compel us to look more closely at youth and how their tastes dictate food practices within households, overturning the standard narrative about Indian families, age, and patriarchal power. This simmering broth of social relations which industrial foods add to and transform is a critical part of India’s cultural landscape. It’s exciting to be able to contribute to a subject that concerns public policy on nutrition and health.

 

Amita Baviskar is Professor of Sociology at the Institute of Economic Growth, Delhi.  She studies the cultural politics of environment and development in rural and urban India. Her current research looks at food practices and the transformation of agrarian environments in western India. Baviskar has taught at the University of Delhi, and has been a visiting scholar at Stanford, Cornell, Yale, SciencesPo and the University of California at Berkeley. She was awarded the 2005 Malcolm Adiseshiah Award for Distinguished Contributions to Development Studies, the 2008 VKRV Rao Prize for Social Science Research, and the 2010 Infosys Prize for Social Sciences.


 

Gastronomica is a peer-reviewed, interdisciplinary, international journal publishing critical, translational studies on food. In the pages of Gastronomica, you will find examinations of historical trends and transformations in food and eating; analyses of the political, economic, and social dimensions of food production and consumption; research briefs on emerging issues in fields related to food research and innovation; and interviews with key figures in the world of food (scholars, activists, producers, and consumers). With cutting-edge research and explorations of the theoretical and methodological underpinnings of food studies, Gastronomica is your go-to resource for understanding the social, cultural, and historical dimensions of food.

The SOAS Food Studies Centre is an interdisciplinary centre dedicated to the study of the political, economic, and cultural dimensions of food, historically and in the contemporary moment, from production, to exchange, to preparation, to consumption. The Centre’s primary purposes are to promote research and teaching in the field of food studies at SOAS and to facilitate links between SOAS and other individuals and institutions with an academic interest in food studies.


Image credits: Maggi Masala noodles by Sixth6sense – Own work, CC BY-SA 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=40729391; Magi Goreng noodles, as served at Restoran Khaleel, Gurney Drive, Penang, Malaysia By amrufm [CC BY 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons


Feminist Media Histories Celebrates Women’s History Month

To celebrate Women’s History Month Feminist Media Histories will be highlighting articles from past issues. Each Tuesday and Thursday throughout the month of March one FMH article will be free to download for 48 hours. We begin with Chika Kinoshita’s article, “Something More Than A Seduction Story: Shiga Akiko’s Abortion Scandal and Late 1930s Japanese Film Culture,” published in the inaugural issue two years ago and available now. A stunning example of how feminist media history can illuminate histories of stardom and moviegoing, while demonstrating the centrality of movie culture to larger discussions of gender and politics in many global contexts. Other articles featured this month will highlight writing on the cinema by filmmaker Esfir Shub and Ms. Magazine critics, the unsung work of female costume designers and radio pioneers, the challenge of digital preservation, lesbian film distribution in the 1970s, contemporary cyberfeminism in Iran and much more.

Featured articles will also showcase the range of special issues published by FMH, including Women and Soundwork, Histories of Celebrity, Materialisms, Found Footage, and Archives and Archivists.

Follow Feminist Media Histories on Facebook and Twitter to catch every free download this month. And watch for future issues on Gender + Comedy, Data, and Comics.

— Shelley Stamp
Editor, Feminist Media Histories


Studies in Late Antiquity Launches First Issue

University of California Press is excited to announce that the first issue of Studies in Late Antiquity (SLA) is now available at sla.ucpress.edu. To celebrate the journal launch, SLA 1.1 will be freely accessible online for the rest of 2017. To access future issues, become an individual subscriber or ask your institution’s library to subscribe on your behalf.

Edited by Elizabeth DePalma Digeser (UC Santa Barbara), SLA will publish original scholarship, book reviews, and exhibit reviews on a wide range of topics pertaining to the world of Late Antiquity (150 – 750 CE). A defining focus of the journal is fostering multi- and interdisciplinary research that emphasizes the interconnectedness of the Mediterranean with other parts of the late ancient world.

Scholars interested in submitting to the journal can learn more about SLA‘s Call for Papers and Author Guidelines here.

 

“We enjoy the methodological diversity of our field, which has long embraced scholars from Archaeology, History, Classics, Philosophy, Religious Studies, and Art History. But because of that very diversity we never find ourselves all assembled in one place. Studies in Late Antiquity is a unique effort to put in conversation scholarship engaged with global late antiquity.”

—Elizabeth DePalma Digeser, Editor, UC Santa Barbara

Table of Contents

Why Does the World Need a New Journal on Late Antiquity?
The Editor and Associate Editors

Community Matters
Elizabeth DePalma Digeser

Late Antiquity and World History: Challenging Conventional Narratives and Analyses
Mark Humphries

How Perilous was it to Write Political History in Late Antiquity?
Anthony Kaldellis

From a Classical to a Christian City: Civic Evergetism and Charity in Fifth Century Rome
Michele Salzman

Book Reviews

Review: Digital_Humanities, by Anne Burdick, Johanna Drucker, Peter Lunenfeld, Todd Presner, and Jeffrey Schnapp
Sarah E. Bond, Tom Keegan

Review: Décadence: “Decline and Fall” or “Other Antiquity”?, edited by Marco Formisano, Therese Fuhrer, and Anna-Lena Stock
Lorenzo DiTommaso

Review: A State of Mixture. Christians, Zoroastrians, and Iranian Political Culture in Late Antiquity, by Richard E. Payne
Greg Fisher

Review: From Shame to Sin: The Christian Transformation of Sexual Morality in Late Antiquity, by Kyle Harper
Wendy Mayer

Review: The Arid Lands. History, Power, Knowledge, by Diana K. Davis
Steven E. Sidebotham


Studying Religion in the Age of Trump

This post is adapted from the introduction to a special Forum, Studying Religion in the Age of Trump, published in the Winter 2017 issue of Religion and American Culture. Enjoy free access to the Forum until March 10, 2017. For more RAC content, become an individual subscriber or ask your library to subscribe on your behalf.


There are many ways to interpret the election of Donald Trump as president of the United States. From appeals to anti-immigrant and anti-Muslim sentiments to attacks on the establishment and political correctness, alongside more traditional topics like abortion, religious freedom, and ethics, enough subterranean shifts occurred to flip some states red and elect a populist president.

What role did religion in play in these events? How might this election cause us to rethink some seemingly settled conclusions about religion and politics, religion and race, and religion and gender, among other topics? Finally, what might we learn from the election of 2016 that will alter our questions and further our work over the next several years?

To consider these essential questions and implications, the editors of Religion and American Culture invited prominent scholars across multiple disciplines to share their perspectives via brief essays or “thought pieces.” All of them have published on subjects that have helped us understand different aspects of religion and American culture in ways that shed light on the nature of religion in politics and public life.

Now, more than ever, is an appropriate moment for us to look back at how we arrived at previous conclusions, question which interpretations might suitably be shaken up, and consider where our fields might fruitfully go in the coming years. The scholars and pieces featured in the Special Forum include:

The Redoubt of Racism: The 2016 Presidential Campaign, the Origins of the Religious Right, and Why It Matters
Randall Balmer
Professor of Religion, Dartmouth College

 The Prosperity Gospel and the American Presidency
Kate Bowler
Assistant Professor of the History of Christianity in North America, Duke University

Redefining Evangelicalism in the Age of Trumpism
Anthea Butler
Associate Professor of Religious Studies, University of Pennsylvania

An American Contrareformatio
Maura Jane Farrelly
Associate Professor of American Studies, Brandeis University

Return of the Monolith? Understanding the White Evangelical Trump Vote
Wes Markofski
Assistant Professor of Sociology, Carleton College

The Hidden Injuries of Class and Religion
Robert Orsi
Professor of Religion, Northwestern University

Reckoning with American White Christian(ist) Patriarchalism and Multicultural Liberalism
Jerry Z. Park and James Clark Davidson
Associate Professor of Sociology, and Graduate Assistant in Sociology of Religion, Baylor University

The Trump Victory and American Evangelicalism
Matthew Sutton
Professor of History, Washington State University

Priorities in Immigration
Grace Yukich
Assistant Professor of Sociology, Quinnipiac University


Methane Levels Increase in Marcellus Shale Region

The following is an excerpt of a report detailing the findings of the article Analysis of local-scale background concentrations of methane and other gas-phase species in the Marcellus Shale, which published in Elementa: Science of the Anthropocene on February 9.

Despite a slow down in the number of new natural gas wells in the Marcellus Shale region of Northeast Pennsylvania, new research led by Drexel University finds that atmospheric methane levels in the area are still increasing. Measurements of methane and other air pollutants taken three years apart in the rural areas of Pennsylvania that have been the target of natural gas development over the last decade, revealed a substantial increase from 2012 to 2015.

“Methane is increasing globally, but the rate of increase for this region is much more rapid than global increases,” said Peter DeCarlo, PhD, an assistant professor who studies atmospheric chemistry in Drexel’s College of Engineering and College of Arts and Sciences, who led the study. “The rapid increase in methane is likely due to the increased production of natural gas from the region which has increased significantly over the 2012 to 2015 period. With the increased background levels of methane, the relative climate benefit of natural gas over coal for power production is reduced.”

Since the first shale gas wells were drilled in the Marcellus Shale Basin, a region that diagonally bisects the state from the northeast to the southwest, there have been concerns about what unlocking the new stores of fossil fuel by an unconventional method, called hydraulic fracturing, could mean for the environment. Nearly a decade later, researchers are still working to understand just how the chemicals released and the chemicals used to release them are lingering in the water and air. Read more…

 

Open Science for Public Good.

Elementa: Science of the Anthropocene is a trans-disciplinary, open access journal committed to the facilitation of collaborative, peer-reviewed research, and with the ultimate objective of accelerating scientific solutions to the challenges presented by this era of human impact.