Elementa: Science of the Anthropocene Call for Papers: Earth & Environmental Science

We invite you to submit your next paper to the Earth & Environmental Science domain of Elementa: Science of the Anthropocene, a trans-disciplinary, open-access journal whose mission is Open Science for the Public Good.

Elementa publishes original research with the ultimate objective of accelerating scientific solutions to the challenges presented by this era of human impact. Structured into six distinct knowledge domains, the Earth & Environmental Science domain encompasses research on processes impacted by humans that occur on the land surface, in groundwater, and in rivers, lakes and coastal areas. This includes, but is not limited to, the traditional sub-disciplines of surficial geology, geomorphology, physical geography, hydrology, glaciology, geochemistry, biogeochemistry, geomicrobiology, limnology, soil science, remote sensing, climate science, and contaminant fate and transport. Studies published in Elementa should relate to processes that have occurred during the Anthropocene epoch (i.e., since the onset of the industrial revolution ~250 years ago) or earlier if they are significantly affected by human activities.

For the full Aims & Scope of the Earth & Environmental Science domain, please click here.

In addition to innovative features including a value-sharing business model and an article-promotion partnership with Kudos, Elementa articles are highly used and downloaded (see highlighted articles below). For the full Elementa story, visit our website at elementascience.org.

For Elementa news and updates, be sure to follow along on Facebook and Twitter.

There has never been a more important time to ensure that transparent, evidence-based, peer-reviewed research has the widest and most impactful dissemination as possible. Please consider submitting your Earth & Environmental Science papers to Elementa or developing a Special Feature or Forum, and feel free to get in touch with Oliver A. Chadwick, University of California, Santa Barbara, Editor in Chief for Earth & Environmental Science, should you have any questions.


Special Features currently open for submissions
Deltas in the Anthropocene

High-impact Earth & Environmental Science content from Elementa: Science of the Anthropocene

(All metrics from May 2, 2017)

Dating the Anthropocene: Towards an empirical global history of human transformation of the terrestrial biosphere
Ellis EC, Fuller DQ, Kaplan JO, Lutters WG
Total usage: 31,617 views/downloads and 7 citations since original publication on December 04, 2013

Seasonally varying contributions to urban CO2 in the Chicago, Illinois, USA region: Insights from a high-resolution CO2 concentration and δ13C record
Moore J, Jacobson AD
Total usage: 19,240 views/downloads and 2 citations since original publication on June 05, 2015

Sources and sinks of carbon in boreal ecosystems of interior Alaska: A review
Douglas TA, Jones MC, Hiemstra CA, Arnold JR
Total usage: 19,097 views/downloads and 1 citation Since original publication on November 07, 2014

Earthcasting the future Critical Zone
Goddéris Y, Brantley SL
Total usage: 18,259 views/downloads and 2 citations since original publication on December 04, 2013

Major impact of climate change on deep-sea benthic ecosystems
Sweetman, Andrew K., et al.
Total usage: 2,554 views/downloads since original publication on February 23, 2017


7 New #OpenAccess Articles from Elementa

An open access scientific journal, Elementa: Science of the Anthropocene’s mission is Open Science for Public Good. With the ultimate objective of publishing original research that accelerates solutions to challenges presented by this era of human impact, Elementa is uniquely structured into six distinct knowledge domains, led by six Editors-in-Chief.

Check out 7 new #OpenAccess articles from Elementa, and consider becoming an Elementa author! Visit elementascience.org to see Calls for Papers from each knowledge domain.


Major impact of climate change on deep-sea benthic ecosystems
Andrew K. Sweetman, et al.
Domains: Earth & Environmental Science, Ecology, Ocean Science

Analysis of local-scale background concentrations of methane and other gas-phase species in the Marcellus Shale
J. Douglas Goetz, et al.
Domain: Atmospheric Science
(Part of a Forum: Oil and Natural Gas Development: Air Quality, Climate Science, and Policy)

Scape goats, silver bullets, and other pitfalls in the path to sustainability
D. G. Webster
Domain: Sustainability Transitions
(Part of a Special Feature: Envisioning Sustainable Transitions)

Legacies of stream channel modification revealed using General Land Office surveys, with implications for water temperature and aquatic life
Seth M. White, et al.
Domain: Ecology

Leveraging agroecology for solutions in food, energy, and water
Marcia DeLonge, Andrea Basche
Domain: Sustainability Transitions
(Part of a Forum: Food-energy-water systems: Opportunities at the nexus)

Ten-year chemical signatures associated with long-range transport observed in the free troposphere over the central North Atlantic
B. Zhang, et al.
Domain: Atmospheric Science


Want to browse more recent content from ElementaClick here for recently published articles, and follow Elementa on Facebook and @elementascience for the latest updates.


Elementa: Science of the Anthropocene Call for Papers: Atmospheric Science

We invite you to submit your next paper to the Atmospheric Science domain of Elementa: Science of the Anthropocene, a trans-disciplinary, open-access journal whose mission is Open Science for the Public Good.

Elementa publishes original research with the ultimate objective of accelerating scientific solutions to the challenges presented by this era of human impact. Structured into six distinct knowledge domains, the Atmospheric Science domain is dedicated to research on the impacts of human activities and the natural state of the Earth’s atmosphere. Elementa invites original research manuscripts that investigate chemical and physical atmospheric properties encompassing natural processes, perturbations, and assessment of future conditions. Elementa, in particular, strives to become a home for publications on societal impacts of atmospheric conditions and processes, for policy-relevant research findings, and for work that directs and nurtures the path towards a sustainable Earth Atmosphere. To attain this goal, submissions going beyond traditional disciplinary borders are welcome.

For the full Aims & Scope of the Atmospheric Science domain, please click here.

In addition to innovative features including a value-sharing business model and an article-promotion partnership with Kudos, Elementa articles are highly used and downloaded (see highlighted articles below). For the full Elementa story, visit our website at elementascience.org.

For Elementa news and updates, be sure to follow along on Facebook and Twitter.

There has never been a more important time to ensure that transparent, evidence-based, peer-reviewed research has the widest and most impactful dissemination as possible. Please consider submitting your Atmospheric Science papers to Elementa or developing a Special Feature or Forum, and feel free to get in touch with Detlev Helmig, University of Colorado Boulder, Editor in Chief for Atmospheric Science, should you have any questions.


Special Features and Forums open for submissions

Quantification of urban greenhouse gas emissions: The Indianapolis Flux experiment
Reactive Gases in the Global Atmosphere
Oil and Natural Gas Development: Air Quality, Climate Science, and Policy

High-impact Atmospheric Science content from Elementa: Science of the Anthropocene

(All metrics from April 13, 2017)

Analysis of local-scale background concentrations of methane and other gas-phase species in the Marcellus Shale
Goetz, J. Douglas, et al.
Total usage: 1,101 views/downloads since original publication on February 9, 2017

Global distribution and trends of tropospheric ozone: An observation-based review
Cooper OR, Parrish DD, Ziemke J, Balashov NV, Cupeiro M, et al. 2014.
Total usage: 31,188 views/downloads and 24 citations since original publication on July 10, 2014

Influence of oil and gas emissions on ambient atmospheric non-methane hydrocarbons in residential areas of Northeastern Colorado
Thompson CR, Hueber J, Helmig D. 2014.
Total usage: 24,420 views/downloads and 10 citations since original publication on Nov 14, 2014

Dimethyl sulfide control of the clean summertime Arctic aerosol and cloud
Leaitch WR, Sharma S, Huang L, Toom-Sauntry D, Chivulescu A, et al. 2013.
Total usage: 19,151 views/downloads and 8 citations since original publication on Dec 04, 2013


“Color-Blind Casting”: Thomas Jefferson and the Erasure of the Black Past in Hamilton

by Lyra D. Monteiro

This post is excerpted from Race-Conscious Casting and the Erasure of the Black Past in Lin-Manuel Miranda’s Hamilton, found in the UC Press journal The Public Historian, Vol. 38 No. 1. Read more and subscribe to The Public Historian here.

The American public has long been enthralled with the mythology of the founding fathers. Though a recent (and recurring) trend within popular history writing, ‘‘founders chic’’ can also be experienced on historic house tours at places such as Mount Vernon, Monticello, and Hamilton Grange that focus on lauding while also humanizing the founders. Overall, the impression these sites give of the Revolutionary era echoes the majority of American history textbooks: the only people who lived during this period—or the only ones who mattered—were wealthy (often slaveowning) white men. There are exceptions to this pattern, such as the African American programming at Colonial Williamsburg, the interpretation of the mills at Lowell, Massachusetts, and the Smithsonian’s recent exhibition about the enslaved families at Monticello. Such challenges to the ‘‘exclusive past’’ are absolutely necessary for our present, as we strive to live up to an ideal of all people being equal and create a world in which women’s voices are no longer silenced and Black Lives Matter.

Currently on Broadway, MacArthur fellow Lin-Manuel Miranda’s hip-hop musical Hamilton brings to life the founding era of the United States in an engaging show that draws heavily on Ron Chernow’s 2004 biography, Alexander Hamilton. With a cast dominated by actors of color, the play is nonetheless yet another rendition of the ‘‘exclusive past,’’ with its focus on the deeds of ‘‘great white men’’ and its silencing of the presence and contributions of people of color in the Revolutionary era.

Race is, in some ways, front and center in this play, as the founding fathers are without exception played by black and Latino men. These choices, which creators and critics have dubbed ‘‘color-blind casting,’’ are in fact far from color blind. The racialized musical forms that each of the characters sings makes this particularly clear.

While most critics love the casting—calling it imaginative, accessible, and thought provoking, others take issue with the premise of casting black actors as the founding fathers. When asked directly in a Wall Street Journal interview about how it feels to portray a white slaveowner, Daveed Diggs, who plays Jefferson, avoided the question altogether. By contrast, theater critic Hilton Als perceives ‘‘something new and unrecognizable . . . on the stage—a dramatic successor to Derek Walcott’s and Jamaica Kincaid’s literary explorations of the surreality of colonialism.’’

This realization brings attention to a truly damning omission in the show: despite the proliferation of black and brown bodies onstage, not a single enslaved or free person of color exists as a character in this play. For the space of only a couple of bars, a chorus member assumes the role of Sally Hemings, but is recognizable as such only by those who catch Jefferson’s reference to the enslaved woman with whom he had an ongoing sexual relationship. Unless one listens carefully to the lyrics—which do mention slavery a handful of times—one could easily assume that slavery did not exist in this world, and certainly that it was not an important part of the lives and livelihoods of the men who created the nation.

The play can thus be seen as insidiously invested in trumpeting the deeds of wealthy white men, at the expense of everyone else, despite its multiracial casting. It is unambiguously celebratory of Hamilton and Washington, and though it makes fun of Jefferson, he is nonetheless a pivotal figure. Sadly, that is where this revolutionary musical fails to push any envelopes: the history it tells is essentially the same whitewashed version of the founding era that has lost favor among many academic and public historians. Here there is only space for white heroes.

The musical undoubtedly does have a special impact on this audience. Seth Andrew, the founder of Democracy Prep Public Schools took 120 students to see the show and reported, ‘‘It was unquestionably the most profound impact I’ve ever seen on a student body.’’ And Miranda has noted that young people ‘‘come alive in their heads’’ when they’re watching the show.If the goal is to make them excited about theater, music, and live performance, great. But reviews of the show regularly imply that what is powerful about the show is how it brings history to life. So I ask again: Is this the history that we most want black and brown youth to connect with—one in which black lives so clearly do not matter?


Lyra D. Monteiro is an assistant professor of history and teaches in the Graduate Program in American Studies at Rutgers University—Newark. She has published on issues in cultural heritage and archaeological ethics and is the co-director of the public humanities organization The Museum On Site.


Elementa: Science of the Anthropocene Call for Papers: Sustainable Engineering

We invite you to submit your next paper to the Sustainable Engineering domain of Elementa: Science of the Anthropocene, a trans-disciplinary, open-access journal whose mission is Open Science for the Public Good.

Elementa publishes original research with the ultimate objective of accelerating scientific solutions to the challenges presented by this era of human impact. Structured into six distinct knowledge domains, the Sustainable Engineering domain seeks to publish original research papers that address all aspects of engineering including the designing, building, and operating of structures, machines, devices, systems, materials and processes. This includes specifically research in the energy, manufacturing, transportation, buildings, water, and materials domains. In accordance with the aims and scope of Elementa and with the precepts of sustainability, manuscripts are specifically sought from investigators conducting trans-disciplinary research on coupled human, built, and natural systems. To this end, it is expected that Sustainable Engineering will fill the publishing void that exists in the spaces between the social, natural, and engineering sciences.

For the full Aims & Scope of the Sustainable Engineering domain, please click here.

In addition to innovative features including a value-sharing business model and an article-promotion partnership with Kudos, Elementa articles are highly used and downloaded (see highlighted articles below). For the full Elementa story, visit our website at elementascience.org.

For Elementa news and updates, be sure to follow along on Facebook and Twitter.

There has never been a more important time to ensure that transparent, evidence-based, peer-reviewed research has the widest and most impactful dissemination as possible. Please consider submitting your engineering papers to Elementa or developing a Special Feature or Forum, and feel free to get in touch with Michael E. Chang, Georgia Institute of Technology, Editor in Chief for Sustainable Engineering, should you have any questions.


Special Forum open for submissions

Food-energy-water systems: Opportunities at the Nexus

High-impact Sustainable Engineering content from Elementa: Science of the Anthropocene

(All metrics from March 30, 2017)

Geoengineering redivivus
Brad Allenby. 2014.
Total usage: 18,256 views/downloads since original publication Feb 12, 2014

Educational materials on sustainable engineering: Do we need a repository?
Cliff I. Davidson, Brad R. Allenby, Liv M. Haselbach, Miriam Heller, William E. Kelly. 2016.
Total usage: 8,192 views/downloads since original publication on Feb 23, 2016


Elementa: Science of the Anthropocene Call for Papers: Ecology

We invite you to submit your next paper to the Ecology domain of Elementa: Science of the Anthropocene, a trans-disciplinary, open-access journal whose mission is Open Science for the Public Good.

Elementa publishes original research with the ultimate objective of accelerating scientific solutions to the challenges presented by this era of human impact. Structured into six distinct knowledge domains, the Ecology domain will consider research centered on the ways in which humans are intentionally and unintentionally altering the conditions for life on Earth and the resulting ecological implications. These anthropogenic effects manifest at molecular levels and can cascade into physiological, population, community, ecosystem, landscape and global responses. Elementa will report new breakthroughs across these levels of ecological organization as well as for all domains of life.

For the full Aims & Scope of the Ecology domain, please click here.

In addition to innovative features including a value-sharing business model and an article-promotion partnership with Kudos, Elementa articles are highly used and downloaded (see highlighted articles below). For the full Elementa story, visit our website at elementascience.org.

For Elementa news and updates, be sure to follow along on Facebook and Twitter.

There has never been a more important time to ensure that transparent, evidence-based, peer-reviewed research has the widest and most impactful dissemination as possible. Please consider submitting your ecological science papers to Elementa or developing a Special Feature or Forum, and feel free to get in touch with Donald R. Zak, University of Michigan, Editor in Chief for Ecology, should you have any questions.


Recent Special Features from the Ecology domain

New approaches to understanding urban aquatic ecosystems

High-impact Ecology content from Elementa: Science of the Anthropocene 

(All metrics from March 23, 2017)

Warming, soil moisture, and loss of snow increase Bromus tectorum’s population growth rate
Compagnoni A, Adler PB. 2014.
Total usage: 23,947 views/downloads since original publication on Jan 08, 2014

Quantifying flooding regime in floodplain forests to guide river restoration
Marks CO, Nislow KH, Magilligan FJ. 2014.
Total usage: 21,709 views/downloads since original publication on Sep 03, 2014

Biotic impoverishment
Naeem S. 2013.
Total usage: 20,328 views/downloads since original publication on Dec 04, 2013

Towards a general theory of biodiversity for the Anthropocene
Cardinale BJ. 2013.
Total usage: 17,863 views/downloads since original publication on Dec 04, 2013


UC Press Music Journals Celebrate American Music

As musicologists gather in Montreal for the Society for American Music conference, UC Press’s music journals are pleased to make select content available to non-subscribers for a limited time. Please enjoy our #AmMusic17 offerings from the Journal of the American Musicological Society, the Journal of Musicology, Music Perceptionand 19th-Century Music.

Film Scholars gathering in Chicago for the annual meeting of the Society for Cinema and Media Studies will also find some articles of interest in the offerings below and should see our separate post with offerings from Film Quarterly and Feminist Media Histories.


The Journal of the American Musicological Society is proud to have been the recipient of six Irving Lowens Article Awards from the Society for American Music since 1997. Read these articles for free through the end of March:

Sam Cooke as Pop Album Artist—A Reinvention in Three Songs
Mark Burford
Vol. 65 No. 1, Spring 2012

The Testimonial Aesthetics of Different Trains
Amy Lynn Wlodarski
Vol. 63 No. 1, Spring 2010

Louis Armstrong, Eccentric Dance, and the Evolution of Jazz on the Eve of Swing
Brian Harker
Vol. 61 No. 1, Spring 2008

Henry Cowell and John Cage: Intersections and Influences, 1933–1941
Leta E. Miller
Vol. 59 No. 1, Spring 2006

The Early Life and Career of the “Black Patti”: The Odyssey of an African American Singer in the Late Nineteenth Century
John Graziano
Vol. 53 No. 3, Autumn, 2000

For Those We Love: Hindemith, Whitman, and “An American Requiem”
Kim H. Kowalke
Vol. 50 No.1, Spring 1997


The Journal of Musicology is pleased to make the following articles, which look at various aspects of American music (including an article on Irving Berlin’s Holiday Inn) free through the end of March:

Consensus and Crisis in American Classical Music Historiography from 1890 to 1950
David C. Paul
Vol. 33 No. 2, Spring 2016

On the Scenic Route to Irving Berlin’s Holiday Inn (1942)
Todd Decker
Vol. 28 No. 4, Fall 2011

University Geographies and Folk Music Landscapes: Students and Local Folksingers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1961–1964
David K. Blake
Vol. 33 No. 1, Winter 2016

Grasp the Weapon of Culture! Radical Avant-Gardes and the Los Angeles Free Press
Andre Mount
Vol. 32 No. 1, Winter 2015


Music Perception offers the following articles free through month’s end:

Viewers’ Interpretations of Film Characters’ Emotions: Effects of Presenting Film Music Before or After a Character is Shown
Siu-Lan Tan, Matthew P. Spackman, Matthew A. Bezdek
Vol. 25 No. 2, December 2007

Swing Rhythm in Classic Drum Breaks From Hip-Hop’s Breakbeat Canon 
by Andrew V. Frane
Vol 34 No. 3, February 2017

Rhythm in the Speech and Music of Jazz and Riddim Musicians
Angela C. Carpenter, Andrea G. Levitt
Vol. 34 No. 1, September 2016

The Asymmetrical Influence of Timing Asynchrony of Bass Guitar and Drum Sounds on Groove
Soyogu Matsushita, Shingo Nomura
Vol. 34 No. 2, December 2016


19th-Century Music celebrates #AmMusic17 and #SCMS17 by offering a selection of articles on American film music. As with the articles above, you can read the following for free through the end of the month:

Black Voices, White Women’s Tears, and the Civil War in Classical Hollywood Movies
Robynn J. Stilwell
Vol. 40 No. 1, Summer 2016

Screwball Fantasia: Classical Music in Unfaithfully Yours
Martin Marks
Vol. 34 No. 3, Spring 2011

Listening to the Self: The Shawshank Redemption and the Technology of Music
Daniel K. L. Chua
Vol. 34 No. 3, Spring 2011


Cinema & Soundtracks: FMH and FQ Celebrate #SCMS17

With the annual meeting of the Society for Cinema & Media Studies beginning this week in Chicago, UC Press journals Feminist Media Histories and Film Quarterly are pleased to offer a collection of limited-time free articles on cinema, soundtracks, and film music. Enjoy free access to these articles today through the end of the meeting on March 26, and be sure to meet the editors if you are attending #SCMS17!


Feminist Media Histories

Editor: Shelley Stamp, University of California, Santa Cruz

SCMS Attendees: Connect with FMH at SCMS 2017!

  • Meet the Editor, Shelley Stamp, to discuss publishing your work in FMH, at the UC Press booth on Friday, 3/24 from 11:00am-12:00pm.
  • Don’t miss the announcement of the winner of the 2016 SCMS Women’s Caucus Graduate Student Writing Prize (co-sponsored by FMH) at the SCMS Women’s Caucus Meeting!

 

In Defense of Voicelessness: The Matter of the Voice and the Films of Leslie Thornto
Pooja Rangan
Summer 2015, Vol. 1 No. 3

Tinkering with Cultural Memory: Gender and the Politics of Synthesizer Historiography
Tara Rodgers
Fall 2015, Vol. 1 No. 4

Backpacking Sounds: Sneha Khanwalkar and the “New” Soundtrack of Bombay Cinema
Shikha Jhingan
Fall 2015, Vol. 1 No. 4

Nené Cascallar’s Thirsty Heart: Gender, Voice, and Desire in a 1950s Argentine Radio Serial
Christine Ehrick
Fall 2015, Vol. 1 No. 4


Film Quarterly

Editor: B. Ruby Rich
Associate Editor: Regina Longo

SCMS attendees: connect with FQ at SCMS 2017!
Associate Editor Regina Longo will be available for meetings at the UC Press booth on Thursday and Friday afternoons.

Just in time for #SCMS17, Film Quarterly is delighted to unveil a newly redesigned website at filmquarterly.org. The refreshed site is fully device responsive and features a stronger visual component with full integration of social media, audio, and video. Full journal content continues to be housed at fq.ucpress.edu, but subscribers and non-subscribers alike are invited to read a curated selection of articles and web-only features on the new filmquarterly.org site.

Given that the annual conferences for both SCMS and the Society for American Music are being held this week, Film Quarterly’s editors would like to call your attention to a selection of articles (all available for free on filmquarterly.org) that should interest attendees of both #SCMS17 and #AmMusic17.

One Step Ahead: A Conversation with Barry Jenkins,
Michael Boyce Gillespie’s interview with the director of the Academy Award-winning Moonlight appears in the newly published Spring issue of Film Quarterly (read online or stop by the UC Press booth at SCMS to peruse a print copy).

Jewish, Queer-ish, Trans, and Completely Revolutionary: Jill Soloway’s Transparent and the New Television
Amy Villarejo
Summer 2016, Vol. 69 No. 4

The Master’s Voice
Claudia Gorbman
Winter 2014, Vol. 68 No. 2

Giving Credit to Paratexts in Top of the Lake and Orange Is the New Black
Kathleen McHugh
Spring 2015, Vol. 68 No. 3

Walking, Talking, Singing, Dancing, Exploding . . . and Silence: Chantal Akerman’s Sountracks
Barbara McBane
Fall 2016, Vol. 70 No. 1


Elementa: Science of the Anthropocene Call for Papers: Sustainability Transitions

We invite you to submit your next paper to the Sustainability Transitions domain of Elementa: Science of the Anthropocene, a trans-disciplinary, open-access journal whose mission is Open Science for the Public Good.

Elementa publishes original research with the ultimate objective of accelerating scientific solutions to the challenges presented by this era of human impact. Structured into six distinct knowledge domains, the Sustainability Transitions domain welcomes contributions that advance knowledge on shifting society-environment interactions to sustainability — to a world in which human beings and other life flourish in diverse social and environmental contexts. A primary purpose of this domain is to bridge boundaries among disciplines, geographies, cultures, and institutions, and between scholars and practitioners; thus, we encourage submissions from scholars in the social and natural sciences and humanities, and practitioners, innovators, and leaders who are forging ahead with strategies to shift towards sustainability.

For the full Aims & Scope of the Sustainability Transitions domain, please click here.

In addition to innovative features including a value-sharing business model and an article-promotion partnership with Kudos, Elementa articles are highly used and downloaded (see highlighted articles below). For the full Elementa story, visit our website at elementascience.org.

For Elementa news and updates, be sure to follow along on Facebook and Twitter.

There has never been a more important time to ensure that transparent, evidence-based, peer-reviewed research has the widest and most impactful dissemination as possible. Please consider submitting your papers to Elementa or developing a Special Feature or Forum, and feel free to get in touch with Anne Kapuscinski, Dartmouth, Editor in Chief for Sustainability Transitions, should you have any questions.


Special Forums currently open for submissions

Multi-stakeholder initiatives for sustainable supply networks
Food-energy-water systems: Opportunities at the Nexus
Cuba’s agrifood system in transition
New Pathways to Sustainability in Agroecological Systems

High-impact Sustainability Transitions content from Elementa: Science of the Anthropocene

(All metrics from March 15, 2017)

Carrying capacity of U.S. agricultural land: Ten diet scenarios
Peters CJ, Picardy J, Darrouzet-Nardi AF, Wilkins JL, Griffin TS, et al. 2016.
Total usage: 73,969 views/downloads since original publication on July 22, 2016

Farmer perceptions of climate change risk and associated on-farm management strategies in Vermont, northeastern United States
Rachel E. Schattman, David Conner, V. Ernesto Méndez
Total usage: 7,373 views/downloads since original publication on Oct 12, 2016

Opportunities for energy-water nexus management in the Middle East & North Africa
Farid AM, Lubega WN, Hickman WW. 2016.
Total usage: 6,043 views/downloads since original publication on Oct 26, 2016


Elementa Sustainability Transitions Invites Submissions to Special Forum

 

On behalf of Elementa‘s Sustainability Transitions domain, we would like to invite you to submit a Research Article or Practice Bridge to the not-for-profit, Open Access scientific journal, Elementa: Science of the Anthropocene.

Kevin J. Dooley, Sustainability Transitions Associate Editor, Department of Supply Chain Management, Arizona State University, is currently inviting submissions to a special forum on “Multi-stakeholder Initiatives for Sustainable Supply Networks”. This forum encourages interdisciplinary and especially practitioner perspectives to address the sustainability transition challenge: How are multi‐stakeholder initiatives being used to create sustainable supply networks?

For those new to it, Elementa is a mission-driven Open Access journal whose ultimate objective is to publish original research reporting that accelerates scientific solutions to the challenges presented by this era of human impact. Elementa articles receive high usage and download metrics (see example articles below), and authors can look forward to their freely-accessible work having a significant impact across interdisciplinary fields and diverse audiences.

For any author whose article is accepted but cannot pay for the Article Processing Charge (APC), an APC waiver fund is available (more on our value-sharing model here). There are no fees for submission.

Here are examples of a:

Published article in this forum:

Practice bridge:

Research article:

Please consider submitting your papers to the Special Forum, and feel free to get in touch with Kevin Dooley should you have any questions or inquiries.