Editor Spotlight: Seth Dobrin, Senior Editor for Sociology and Social Science Methods

photo-seth.dobrinIn this Q&A with Senior Editor Seth Dobrin, we learn about what brought him to publishing and his plans for Sociology and Social Science Methods. 

Why did you become an acquisitions editor? 

I’ve always liked how being an editor is half humanities and half problem solving. I think it’s a good fit for who I am. As an example, when I was a sophomore in college I decided to major in English and when I was a junior I became an EMT. It sounds naïve but I wanted to help people when they needed it. These days my authors and I aren’t riding an ambulance together – although sometimes hitting a deadline can feel that way – but we’re creating something that solves a real problem for real people. Being an editor means I get to work with authors and educators who improve their students’ lives by explaining something, or telling an important story. Hopefully, we make the world a little better.

What projects are you working on now to develop the Sociology and Social Science Methods list at UC Press? 

It’s been two years since I joined UC Press and I’m really excited about the books we’re producing. One that’s high on my list is Deviance: Social Constructions and Blurred Boundaries by Leon Anderson at Utah State University. We just finished our peer review and the manuscript is coming together nicely. I’m also thrilled to be publishing books that will help social scientists do research, like two books by John Hoffmann at Brigham Young UniversityPrinciples of Data Management and Presentation (publishing Fall 2017) and Regression Models for Categorical, Count, and Related Variables. These books strengthen data literacy, which fits well with the educational mission of the Press. And no, I have not been spending too much time in Utah. Great national parks!

You’re developing new textbooks and course books. Why is new content intended for use in courses important to you? 

Sociology is a hugely important discipline because it reveals things that we don’t always see or recognize about our society or ourselves. It does that through its unique perspective and rigorous research. Personally, I think that’s more important now than ever. Our world needs critical thinkers. We need people who can see, study, and critique social systems so that we can make progress.

Are there other particular courses where you’re looking to develop new content?

What’s exciting about the Press is that our Higher Education program allows us to help faculty in areas where big college publishers aren’t focused—on mid- and upper-level courses on social institutions and social change. I’m also looking to sign in courses like qualitative and quantitative methods—places where the rubber meets the road for would-be scholars. I want to find educators who teach these courses and who see the same needs and opportunities I do. It’s a new venture with a lot of support from the Press. We, alongside our authors and faculty, have the capacity to do something great with it.

Join Us 

Interested in publishing your work with Seth and UC Press? Contact Seth at sdobrin@ucpress.edu.

And learn more about Sociology and the Higher Education Program.

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Editor Spotlight: Christopher Johnson, Executive Editor for Psychology

Christopher.Johnson.Photo

For more than 120 years, UC Press has championed work that influences public discourse and challenges the status quo in multiple fields of study. It was with considerable excitement that we have decided to add psychology to our catalog—complementing our already strong presence in sociology, anthropology, history and other disciplines.

In this Q&A with Executive Editor Christopher Johnson, we learn about what brought him to publishing and his plans for the new psychology list.

Why did you become an acquisitions editor?

I spent the early years of my publishing career in sales and marketing. But like the kid with his nose pressed against the candy store window, I spent most of that time eagerly waiting for the moment when I could be the person to work directly with authors, helping shape ideas, and solving problems. Over twenty years later (and no longer a kid), it’s still a thrill to sit across a desk from a prospective author and ask the question: “How can I help you tell this story and reach your audience?”

What projects are you working on now to develop the Psychology list at UC Press?

Building a program from scratch is an exciting but somewhat daunting challenge. Fortunately, the response from psychologist around the country has been overwhelmingly positive. Though we are new to psychology, the UC Press brand is widely known and much respected.

I’ve been at the Press for one year and I’m happy that I have projects at all stages of development. For example:

  • My first book at UC Press is Seeing by noted cognitive psychologist Tom Cornsweet (Emeritus Professor at UC Irvine). The manuscript is undergoing final reviewing now and we hope to publish in late 2017.
  • My most recent signings include two innovative textbooks. The first is intended for the psychology of adjustment course by Robert Innes at Vanderbilt University and the second a highly applied book for the testing and measurement course by Lisa Hollis-Sawyer at Northeastern Illinois University.
  • I’m currently reviewing a number of proposals for new titles. It’s a wonderfully eclectic mix. From a companion reader to a behavioral statistics course, to a first person account of pregnancy and the first nine months of life by a developmental psychologist, to a much needed new text for the psychology of the self course, these projects under consideration reflect the broad scope of our new program.

You’re developing new textbooks and course books. Why is new content intended for use in courses important to you?

I’m very interested in acquiring a broad range of psychology books including works of popular science (a.k.a trade books), as well as more specialized works intended primarily for researchers. However, I am especially excited to hear from prospective authors interested in reaching audiences in undergraduate and graduate courses. The industry is undergoing dramatic changes and the big commercial publishers are de-emphasizing (or eliminating altogether) textbook offerings for upper division courses. I’m really proud that UC Press is committed to serving this increasingly under-served community of teachers and students.

Join Us 

Interested in publishing your work with Christopher and UC Press? Contact Christopher at cjohnson@ucpress.edu.

And learn more about the Higher Education Program.

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Editor Spotlight: Lyn Uhl, Executive Editor for Communication

photo-LinkedIn-Lyn.UhlIn this Q&A with Executive Executive Editor Lyn Uhl, we learn about what brought her to publishing and her plans for the new Communication list.

Why did you become an acquisitions editor? 

It seemed cooler than being a firefighter. As nerdy or cliché as it may sound, I chose publishing because I’ve always loved books and being a part of making them seemed like the best job in the world. The acquisition part of my job has a detective component that really motivates me and the process of helping authors develop their ideas is creative and fun.

What projects are you working on now to develop the Communication list at UC Press? 

I’ve been at the press for one year and I’m happy that I already have projects at all stages of development. For example:

  • My first book at UC Press is Constructions of Terrorism with Michael Stohl (UC Santa Barbara Communication Department and Orfalea Center for Global and International Studies), Richard Burchill, and Scott Englund. It’s now in the hands of our book production team and will publish in Fall 2017.
  • My most recent signings include a book for the course on Strategic Environmental Communication by Lisa Leombruni at UC Santa Barbara.
  • I just finished reviewing a wonderful book on gender and identity communication, which I hope to sign to our list soon.
  • And I am working with two amazing scholars—Patricia Parker (Department Chair at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill) and Lawrence Frey (Professor at University of Colorado, Boulder)—to develop a new series of books in the area of social justice and activism.

You’re developing new textbooks and course books. Why is new content intended for use in courses important to you? 

Communication is a vibrant and growing field right now, and there are many new and emerging topics and courses that require new content. It’s exciting to work on the first book in an area or the first book with an important new approach. Also, with so many books in advanced (9th and 10th) editions and large higher education publishers reducing their focus on upper division courses, there is often a need for a new defining text written from the ground up.

Are there other particular courses where you’re looking to develop new content?

Yes, it’s actually a pretty long list. But my focus right now is on intercultural communication, organizational communication, and global communication. I’m also exploring a series idea in rhetoric.

Join Us 

Interested in publishing your work with Lyn and UC Press? Contact Lyn at luhl@ucpress.edu. Or set up a time to meet Lyn at the National Communication Association conference from November 10-13 in Philadelphia.

And learn more about Communication and the Higher Education Program.

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Editor’s Spotlight: Meet Ryan Abrecht, reviews editor of Studies in Late Antiquity

This post is part of a blog series introducing the editors of Studies in Late Antiquity (SLA), our new online quarterly journal scheduled to launch in February 2017. Stay tuned for more Editor’s Spotlights with other SLA editors leading up to the journal launch.


RRA with Tetrarchs
Ryan Abrecht, University of San Diego

We are pleased to introduce Ryan Abrecht, assistant professor at University of San Diego and Book Review Editor of Studies in Late AntiquityA specialist in ancient Mediterranean history and culture, Abrecht’s scholarly work focuses on the history of the Roman Empire, but also endeavors to put Roman history into dialogue with the histories of other regions and to consider the continuing influence of antiquity on modern attitudes and world events. He is also broadly interested in premodern world history, in particular in the comparative study of ancient Roman and Chinese imperialism.

With his wide-ranging background in ancient history across the East and West, the Book Review section of SLA will reflect the journal’s mission of connecting the Mediterranean world with other ancient regions.

We sat down with Abrecht to talk more about his research interests, what drew him to the journal, and how he thinks Studies in Late Antiquity will influence scholarship in the field.

Can you tell us more about your research interests and areas of expertise?

My scholarly work focuses on the history of the ancient Mediterranean, but also endeavors to put that history into dialogue with the histories of other regions and to consider the antiquity’s continuing influence on modern attitudes and world events. I’m interested in the ways that imperialism reshapes the identities of both conquerors and conquered people alike. As a result, some of my research focuses on interactions between different groups in borderlands and frontier regions, such as the contacts that developed between Romans and Germanic peoples along the Rhine and Danube Rivers in late antiquity. I am also interested in urban history and in the relationships between social and spatial boundaries that shape urban landscapes. With that in mind, I’m currently working on a book manuscript that analyzes immigration and neighborhood life in imperial cities such as classical Athens, imperial Rome, late antique Constantinople, and Tang dynasty Chang’an.

unnamedWhat drew you to editorship of Studies in Late Antiquity?

Beyond the chance to work closely with a group offantastic colleagues, what drew me to the editorial board of Studies in Late Antiquity was the opportunity to be on the cutting edge of new scholarship about the late antique world and to develop relationships with others around the world who share my enthusiasm about it. I see SLA as a perfect opportunity to both broaden and critique the boundaries meaning of late antiquity as a field of study. Late antiquity in the Mediterranean, for example, looks quite different than it does in post-Han dynasty China, yet in both places we can trace a shift from an older “classical” model of social and political organization and the emergence of something new. I am excited to have conversations with a diverse group of scholars who can tease out the common ground between these different “late antiquities” while simultaneously calling attention to the contextual differences that make them unique. In short, I’m excited that SLA will be a way explore the different meanings of late antiquity with colleagues whose ideas will challenge and enrich my own.

How do you anticipate Studies in Late Antiquity will influence the scholarship in your field?

Through serving as SLA’s Book Review Editor, I’ll be able to think with others about how the questions we ask about the often tumultuous late antique world relate to contemporary issues such as migration, religious violence, or ethnic conflict. I see this new journal as a perfect opportunity to talk more about issues of reception – how we see the past differently and assign new meanings to it in response to the changing circumstances of the present. I’m already confident that Studies in Late Antiquity will add the expanding body of knowledge about late antiquity by supporting new scholarship and innovative research. Beyond this, I’m also hopeful that Studies in Late Antiquity will galvanize scholars working on a wide range of topics to think about what they can learn from each other by looking beyond the boundaries that have traditionally defined disciplines, geographical regions, and historical periods.


Want to get more involved with SLA? Here are just a few ways:

  • Submit your papers to SLA. Visit sla.ucpress.edu for more information.
  • Recommend SLA to your institution. Give this Library Recommendation Form to your campus librarian to request that your library pre-order a subscription.
  • Sign up for SLA launch updates! For future updates on the inaugural issue, free sample content, and more, sign up for email alerts at sla.ucpress.edu.

Editor’s Spotlight: Meet Susanna Elm, associate editor of Studies in Late Antiquity

This post is part of a blog series introducing the editors of Studies in Late Antiquity (SLA), our new online quarterly journal scheduled to launch in February 2017. Stay tuned for more Editor’s Spotlights with other SLA editors leading up to the journal launch.


Authorphoto
Susanna Elm, UC Berkeley

We are pleased to introduce Susanna Elm, Professor of History at UC Berkeley and one of the associate editors of Studies in Late Antiquity. Having received her D.Phil in Ancient History from St. Hilda’s College, University of Oxford, Elm has taught at UC Berkeley since 1988, teaching at the graduate and undergraduate levels in subjects varying from Ancient Mediterranean History and Archaeology, to Classics, to Religious Studies.

Elm’s areas of expertise fit seamlessly into the broad editorial scope of SLA, with her Ancient History research focused on the political, economic, religious, and cultural history of the later Roman Empire across the East and West. Her current projects include research on Augustine of Hippo and slavery, the possibility of formulating a theology of economics, late Roman Antioch, elite display, and aspects of ancient medicine.

We sat down with Elm to talk more about her research interests, her involvement in the journal, and how she thinks Studies in Late Antiquity will influence scholarship in her field.

Can you tell us more about your research interests and areas of expertise?

My area of expertise is the history of the later Roman empire with an emphasis on social, economic and cultural history. Central to my endeavor is an integrated approach that combines written sources from authors that are Christian and non-Christian with documentary and material sources. Currently, I am particularly interested in questions of slavery and taxation in relation to theology, but also in aspects of masculinity as transmitted through the depictions of Roman, barbarian, and Christian men in a wide variety of contexts in our fourth and fifth century sources.

unnamedWhat drew you to editorship of Studies in Late Antiquity?

My interest in the journal is of very long standing: it goes back to the early days of the collaboration of scholars interested in matters of late antique studies in California, which, early on, always also included the regions bordering on the Roman empire. In fact, I always thought that California itself, such a complex, dynamic region, facing both East and toward the Pacific Rim, always creating and adapting to change, is an incredibly “late antique” world. In other words, for me, living in California has really influenced the way I look at the later Roman empire, and I see aspects of that empire reflected in California. And remember, though many have seen decline when they looked at the later Roman empire, it took a very, very long time until that actually happened – if it actually ever did (just to mention a perennial debate).

How do you anticipate Studies in Late Antiquity will transform the scholarship in your field?

I am very exited about the intention of this journal and its editors to work hard to bring together those who strive to look beyond Rome’s borders from both sides, and also beyond questions of Christian, non-Christian, religious, secular, and so on. I do hope that our colleagues in the non-Roman world will tell us where our blind spots are, what we take for granted without further examination, and to encourage us to experiment with methodological approaches that extend our comfort zone. To offer a forum for such debates is, I find, most distinct, interesting and exiting about SLA.


Want to get more involved with SLA? Here are just a few ways:

  • Submit your papers to SLA. Visit sla.ucpress.edu for more information.
  • Recommend SLA to your institution. Give this Library Recommendation Form to your campus librarian to request that your library pre-order a subscription.
  • Sign up for SLA launch updates! For future updates on the inaugural issue, free sample content, and more, sign up for email alerts at sla.ucpress.edu.

Editor’s Spotlight: Meet Edward Watts, associate editor of Studies in Late Antiquity

This post is part of a blog series introducing the editors of Studies in Late Antiquity (SLA), our new online quarterly journal scheduled to launch in February 2017. Stay tuned for more Editor’s Spotlights with other SLA editors leading up to the journal launch.


Watts photo 2-3
Edward Watts, UC San Diego

We are pleased to introduce Edward Watts, Professor of History at UC San Diego and one of the associate editors of Studies in Late Antiquity. Since receiving his PhD in History from Yale University, Watts has published four books and more than 40 articles on topics ranging from the Old Academy in the fourth century BC, to the relationship between orality and textuality in the early Byzantine period.

With his research focused primarily on the intellectual and religious history of the Roman Empire and the early Byzantine Empire, Watts’ expertise aligns perfectly with the journal’s editorial vision to connect the Mediterranean with other parts of the late ancient world.

We sat down with Watts to talk about his research interests, his involvement in the journal, and what makes Studies in Late Antiquity different from other journals in the field.

Can you tell us more about your research interests and areas of expertise?

unnamedMy research spans most of Roman, late antique, and early medieval history. The areas of Christianization, Roman intellectual and cultural life, ancient philosophy (especially Platonism), and Roman numismatics particularly appeal to me.

What inspired you to get involved with Studies in Late Antiquity?

The journal offers a unique platform to explore the chronological and geographic limits of late antiquity. As the field grows and matures, it needs venues that can accommodate new visions of what late antiquity research could encompass, while offering space for intellectual experimentation. Studies in Late Antiquity offers that space, and this is an an exciting opportunity to participate in the continued evolution of scholarship focused on late antiquity.

What sets Studies in Late Antiquity apart from other journals in the field?

Studies in Late Antiquity will enable scholars working on late antiquity to expand the geographical reach of their work, develop projects that transcend regional or linguistic boundaries, and publish more of the exciting work done on late antique material culture. By providing a venue for new and cutting edge projects, this journal will help chart future developments in the field.


Want to get more involved with SLA? Here are just a few ways:

  • Submit your papers to SLA. Visit sla.ucpress.edu for more information.
  • Recommend SLA to your institution. Give this Library Recommendation Form to your campus librarian to request that your library pre-order a subscription.
  • Sign up for SLA launch updates! For future updates on the inaugural issue, free sample content, and more, sign up for email alerts at sla.ucpress.edu.

LIVE from the New York Public Library: Nonstop Metropolis on 10/18

Tomorrow, Oct 18th, from 7:00 – 9:00pm, lucky New Yorkers will get to hear about the creative process and stories surrounding the making of Nonstop Metropolis: A New York City Atlas at LIVE from the New York Pubic Library (a limited number of tickets are still available; book ahead to avoid disappointment!).

Live NYPL

A city is made of layers—of vitality, of diversity, of richness, but also of inequity and erasure. Weaving together a tapestry of this robust city, Nonstop Metropolis collects writings from linguists, music historians, cartographers, artists, and more. LIVE from the NYPL welcomes the minds behind this project—writer and activist Rebecca Solnit, geographer Joshua Jelly-Schapiro, essayist Garnette Cadogan, and authors Suketu Mehta and Luc Sante—for a discussion about this thriving metropolis.

Nonstop Metropolis

About the authors:

REBECCA SOLNIT is a prolific writer, and the author of many books including Savage Dreams, Storming the Gates of Paradise, and the best-selling atlases Infinite City: A San Francisco Atlas and Unfathomable City: A New Orleans Atlas, all from UC Press. She received the Corlis Benefideo Award for Imaginative Cartography from the North American Cartographic Information Society for her work on the previous atlases.

JOSHUA JELLY-SCHAPIRO is a geographer and writer whose work has appeared in The New York Review of Books, New York, Harper’s, and the Believer, among many other publications. He is the author of Island People: The Caribbean and the World.

GARNETTE CADOGAN is a Visiting Fellow at the Institute for Advanced Studies in Culture at the University of Virginia, and a Visiting Scholar at the Institute for Public Knowledge at New York University. He is the editor-at-large of Nonstop Metropolis: A New York City Atlas and is at work on a book on walking.

SUKETU MEHTA is the New York-based author of Maximum City: Bombay Lost and Found which won the Kiriyama Prize and the Hutch Crossword Award, and was a finalist for the 2005 Pulitzer Prize, the Lettre Ulysses Prize, the BBC4 Samuel Johnson Prize, and the Guardian First Book Award. He has won the Whiting Writers’ Award, the O. Henry Prize, and a New York Foundation for the Arts Fellowship for his fiction. Mehta’s work has been published in The New Yorker, The New York Times Magazine, National Geographic, Granta, Harper’s Magazine, Time, and Newsweek, and has been featured on NPR’s ‘Fresh Air’ and ‘All Things Considered.’ Mehta is an Associate Professor of Journalism at New York University. Mehta was born in Calcutta and raised in Bombay and New York. He is a graduate of New York University and the Iowa Writers’ Workshop.

LUC SANTE‘s books include Low Life, Evidence, The Factory of Facts, Kill All Your Darlings, and The Other Paris. He has been a frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books since 1981 and had written for a wide variety of other publications. His awards include a Whiting Writers Award, an Award in Literature from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, a Grammy (for album notes), an Infinity Award in Writing from the International Center of Photography, and Guggenheim and Cullman fellowships. He teaches writing and the history of photography at Bard College.

 


Editor’s Spotlight: Meet Emily Albu, associate editor of Studies in Late Antiquity

This post is part of a blog series introducing the editors of Studies in Late Antiquity (SLA), our new online quarterly journal scheduled to launch in February 2017. Stay tuned for more Editor’s Spotlights with other SLA editors leading up to the journal launch.


Emily Albu, UC Davis
Emily Albu, UC Davis

We are pleased to introduce Emily Albu, Professor of Classics at UC Davis and one of the associate editors of Studies in Late Antiquity. Albu’s research began as a PhD candidate at UC Berkeley, where she obtained a doctorate in Comparative Literature focused on medieval literatures in Latin, Byzantine Greek, and Old French/Old Provençal. Since 1995 she has taught at UC Davis, where she has continued her research in Classical receptions, medieval historiography, and cartography in the Middle Ages, including the transmission of texts, genres, and ideas in late antiquity.

Albu’s wealth of experience, particularly in mapping ancient geography and cultures, makes her an ideal associate editor of Studies in Late Antiquity, a journal that seeks to emphasize the interconnected of the Mediterranean with other parts of the late ancient world.

We sat down with Albu to talk about her background, research interests, and what excites her most about the new journal.

What inspired you to get involved with Studies in Late Antiquity?

Studies in Late Antiquity seems the natural next step for the group that first formed in 1999 as the University of California Multi-Campus Research Group (MRG) on the History and Culture of Late Antiquity. I was on its steering committee until it affiliated with the Ancient Borderlands MRG (2011-12) and serve now on the core faculty of the California Consortium for the Study of Late Antiquity (2011-present). unnamedIn its various iterations this group has met several times a year to share research, organize conferences, mentor graduate students, and offer team-taught, video-conferenced seminars to students on our various campuses. We traveled the state to present workshops to California’s public school teachers, and in 2007 the American Philological Association (now the Society for Classical Studies) awarded us its Prize for Scholarly Outreach. An MRG-organized Shifting Frontiers Conference at UC Santa Barbara resulted in the 2006 publication of Violence in Late Antiquity: Perceptions and Practices, ed. H.A. Drake, with four colleagues and me assisting Hal as co-editors.

What excites you most about the new journal?

The expansive research projects of our California Consortium faculty, along with the evolving concerns of the field, informed our desire to create this new journal. I am most excited about the geographical range that Studies in Late Antiquity embraces, as well as the broad reach of the journal’s topical interests. The online format also lets us experiment with new ways of presenting maps and other visual materials. I hope soon to take advantage of all these possibilities while editing an issue devoted to teaching late antiquity.


Want to get more involved with SLA? Here are just a few ways:

  • Submit your papers to SLA. Visit sla.ucpress.edu for more information.
  • Recommend SLA to your institution. Give this Library Recommendation Form to your campus librarian to request that your library pre-order a subscription.
  • Sign up for SLA launch updates! For future updates on the inaugural issue, free sample content, and more, sign up for email alerts at sla.ucpress.edu.

Editor’s Spotlight: Meet Elizabeth DePalma Digeser, founding editor of Studies in Late Antiquity

This post is part of a series introducing the editors of Studies in Late Antiquity (SLA), our new online quarterly journal scheduled to launch in February 2017. Stay tuned for more Editor’s Spotlights with other SLA editors leading up to the journal launch.


unnamedWe are pleased to introduce Elizabeth DePalma Digeser, Professor of Roman History at UC Santa Barbara, as the founding editor of Studies in Late Antiquity. Having taught at Cornell University, St. Norbert College, and McGill University before joining the UC family, Digeser’s research interests focus on Mediterranean religious and political changes in the late third and early fourth centuries CE, together with the legacy of these developments.

Digeser’s experience and her passion for thinking about the interconnectedness of the Mediterranean with other parts of the late ancient world make her the perfect founding editor of Studies in Late Antiquity, a journal that seeks to foster multi- and interdisciplinary research.

We sat down with Digeser to talk about her research, her vision for Studies in Late Antiquity, and what excites her most about the new journal.

Can you tell us about your research interests and area(s) of expertise?

My research interests have consistently tried to contextualize ideas traditionally seen as philosophical or religious. At first, this effort sought to understand the political, social, and intellectual currents that gave rise to the expression of these ideas in texts and the ramifications that reading these texts might have had. More recently, I’ve also tried to understand how we might broaden our notion of “context” to include the testimony to traditions and practices conveyed by material culture, especially evidence of cultic practice that may elude our textual sources. Increasingly, I’ve also turned for inspiration to anthropological and sociological models of human interactions in borderlands regions in order to ask questions about how and why people define themselves as belonging to particular groups.

elizabeth_depalma_digeser
Elizabeth DePalma Digeser, UC Santa Barbara

What drew you to editorship of the journal?

I was drawn to edit Studies in Late Antiquity after many conversations with colleagues at a number of different conferences. We enjoy the methodological diversity of our field, which has long embraced scholars from Archaeology, History, Classics, Philosophy, Religious Studies, and Art History. But because of that very diversity we never find ourselves all assembled in one place. A notable exception, of course, are the biennial “Shifting Frontiers” meetings, but as these are themed, they tend not to foster broad conversations (especially as academic travel budgets are increasingly limited to those giving papers). So there has for some years been an expressed need for a forum to which we might all contribute.

At the same time, many of us—in part, perhaps as a result of teaching World History—feel a need to carry forward the call first voiced in Peter Brown’s World of Late Antiquity; that is, to connect the Mediterranean world with the broader late ancient world. Yet, this is something that requires deliberate outreach, even as anecdotally we know that our colleagues working in this chronological period in China, India, or Africa, for example, are also looking to make contact with other regions. It seemed to me, then, that this particular journal was a way to begin to constitute such a group of scholars, to foster the necessary conversations, and thus to stimulate further multi- and interdisciplinary research along the trajectories we all were looking for. If we can start to influence this kind of collaborative research, I’d be very happy.

What sets Studies in Late Antiquity apart from other journals in the field, and what excites you most about the journal?

SLA stands out for several reasons, both of which I find truly exciting: First, it is a unique effort to put in conversation scholarship engaged with “global late antiquity.” Second, its online format will allow us a freedom to do what no other late ancient English language journal does, from publishing high-quality images, to maps, to 3-D projections, to datasets, to video and more.


Want to get more involved in SLA? Here are just a few ways:

  • Submit your papers to SLA. Visit sla.ucpress.edu for more information.
  • Recommend SLA to your institution. Give this Library Recommendation Form to your campus librarian to request that your library pre-order a subscription.
  • Sign up for SLA launch updates! For future updates on the inaugural issue, free sample content, and more, sign up for email alerts at sla.ucpress.edu.

Keith Watenpaugh on the Ottoman History Podcast

Keith Watenpaugh, author of Bread from Stones, was interviewed on the Ottoman History Podcast:

The First World War and the fall of the Ottoman Empire are defining moments in the political history of the modern Middle East. This narrative is usually told through the lenses of the breakup of empire, the successes and failures of national movements, and the colonial involvement of British and French Mandates in the region. In this episode, Keith Watenpaugh offers a different approach to this story through a critical look at the role of American humanitarian organizations such as Near East Relief admist the war and its aftermath, which is the subject of his new monograph entitled Bread From Stones (UC Press, 2015). In the podcast, we discuss how the massive displacement of the First World War, the Armenian genocide, and the need to care for refugees in the postwar Middle East contributed to the evolution of aid and charity organizations and the creation of what scholars see as modern humanitarian structures and ideologies. Prof. Watenpaugh describes how Americans came to see their unique humanitarian relationship with Armenians and other communities in the Middle East, and we discuss how the historical study of humanitarianism as an ideology in its own right changes not only the historiography of the region but also the way we think about present-day humanitarian crises.

Listen to the podcast here.