Energy and the Environment

The Commonwealth Club will be hosting a provocative discussion between the CEO of Chevron and the Executive Direct of The Sierra Club tonight. In Chevron + Sierra Club Drilling for Common Ground, Alan Murray, Deputy Managing Editor of The Wall Street Journal will moderate a conversation between Dave O’Reilly of Chevron and Carl Pope of The Sierra Club.Their discussion will focus on how we might make a transition to renewable fuels—and who should bear the costs.

The lecture takes place at 6:30 p.m. at Hotel Nikko. Tickets are $15 for members and $30 non-members. The program is also being videotaped and recorded.

10852.ch01 This event coincides with the release of Peter Asmus‘s Introduction to Energy in California, a useful guide to the energy challenges that California faces. Those interested in the subject have good reason to keep an eye on energy in California. Asmus writes, “In each major renewable energy category—solar, wind, geothermal, and biomass—California quickly jumped into the category of global pioneer. It was not always pretty, as anyone who drives to the wind farms near Palm Springs on Hwy. 10 can attest to. However, it was remarkable that a single state—albeit a giant one with a plethora of renewable energy in the northern, southern, eastern, and western parts of the state—could spawn an entire industry in less than a decade.”

Illustration from Introduction to Energy in California shows the 240 MW Coso geothermal complex, located near the China Lake Weapons Reserve, just south of Owens Valley on Highway 395.

3 thoughts on “Energy and the Environment

  1. Thank you for keeping renewable energy in front of people. Individuals must eventually take responsibility for the energy they use and begin to produce as well as consume.

  2. California has to be commended for it efforts regarding the adoption of alternative energy sources. However it also needs to temper this with environmental concerns. It can be such a fine line and difficult task seeking to satisfy one need while at the same time creating problems in another area. Maybe an easier way to control this quandary is to encourage more individual adoption of alternative energy solutions. Consequently preserving the desert and the desert habitat.

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