How did we do at the American Historical Association’s annual awards? Well, since you’ve asked…

Far be it for me to seem like I’m bragging, so here’s our history editor, Niels Hooper, with the good news:

Dear all,

UC Press has won 4 of the major prizes at the largest and most prestigious annual history conference, the American Historical Association. This is a remarkable success for any press. History is a massive field with all major university and trade presses publishing competitively in it (there are 125 presses exhibiting at this year’s meeting). Only two of these are mine … two are Reed’s … so I can brag on his behalf.

The winners are:

The Social Space of Language: Vernacular Culture in British Colonial Punjab by Farina Mir won the John F. Richards Prize for the most distinguished book of the year on South Asian History.

 

 

 

Venice Incognito: Masks in the Serene Republic by James H. Johnson won the George L. Mosse Prize for the most “outstanding major work of extraordinary scholarly distinction, creativity and originality in the intellectual and cultural history of Europe after the Renaissance.”

 

 

 

Dangerous Pregnancies: Mothers, Disabilities, and Abortion in Modern America by Leslie J. Reagan won the Joan Kelly Memorial Prize for the best book in Women’s History.

 

 

 

Golden-Silk Smoke: A History of Tobacco in China, 1550–2010 by Carol Benedict won the John K. Fairbanks Prize for the most outstanding book in the history of East Asia after 1800.

 

 

 

Congratulations to everyone who worked on these.
Thanks, Niels